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October 31, 1978 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


HELD FLAMMABLES
Truck upset,
kills driver

The Michigan Daily-Tuesddy, October 31, 1978-Page 5
CHICAGO PARKING ORDINANCE STANDS:
Court to rule on teen abortions

By KEVIN ROSEBOROUGH
A tanker truck filled with 4,500
pounds of the highly flammable and
toxic chemical amyl alcohol over-
turned on eastbound 1-94 just west of
State Street yesterday morning,
killing the driver and injuring
another man riding in the cab.
According to State ,Police, the
;tanker ran off the road about 9:30
a.m. "There was no defect in the
vehicle and witnesses said that no
ears forced him off the road," said
trooper Richard SACK. -
OTHER Statfe Police officers said
the driver, William Farmer, 34, of
Cut and Shoot, Texas, fell asleep at
the wheel of his huge rig. Officials
could not confirm reports that he
may have suffered a heart attack
prior to the crash.
Farmer was pronounced dead on
arrival at University Hospital due to
head injuries, said State Police.

Passenger Robert Adams, 26, was
treated for minor injuries and
releases. The two were headed for
Wyandotte with their load of in-
dustrial chemical, and were driving
for Younger Brothers, Incorporated,
of Houston, Texas.
The flammable contents of the
demolished tanker were pumped in-
to another truck by the Wolverine
Disposal Company of Ypsilanti and
taken to Willow Run Airport for
disposal.
Authorities closed off about three
miles of both the eastbound and
westbound lanes of the freeway for
over eight hours as crews worked to
remove the spilled liquid. Crews also
sprayed the area with foam to
minimize the danger of an explosion
and a crane righted the empty
tanker. The rig was later towed
away and the freeway was re-
opened last night.

WASHINGTON.(AP) - The Supreme
Court said yesterday it will decide
whether states may require unwed
females under 18 to get the consent of
parents or a judge before undergoing
an abortion.
The test case from Massachusetts
may provide a distinction from a 1976
Supreme Court ruling that banned laws
giving parents "absolute" veto power
over young girls' decisions to have
abortions.
In a busy day on the bench, the
justices also:
" Agreed to decide whether a
Louisiana woman fired by former Rep.
Otto Passman may sue her ex-boss for
alleged sexual bias. Lower courts ruled
that Shirley Davis was legally barred
from suing.
" Left intact a Chicago ordinance
that forces car rental companies to pay
for their customers' parking tickets.
Lawyers for Hertz and Avis told the
court the ordinance will cost their com-
panies millions.
" Said they will decide whether
minors accused of crimes may be
questioned by police after asking to
consult with their probation officers.
The California Supreme Court ruled
that the "Miranda" doctrine protecting

criminal suspects extends to youths
who want help from probation officers.
" Agreed to decide in a case from
Texas what administrative safeguards
states must provide for parents suspec-
ted of child abuse. Texas courts ruled
that parents threatened with the loss of
a child's custody must be given an im-
mediate hearing.
* Refused to keep secret the
Securities and Exchange Commission
files on foreign bribes allegedly made
by International Telephone and
Telegraph Corp. That means details of
charges against ITT are likely to be
made public within the next 30 days.
In the abortion case, a three-judge
federal court in Boston struck down the
Massachusetts law after ruling that it
unconstitutionally infringed on the
privacy rights of "mature minors."
Under the invalidated law, parents
always had to be consulted when an.
unwed minor wanted to abort a fetus in
any stage of her pregnancy.
IF THE PARENTS refused to con-
sent, a state judge could allow the abor-
tion if ruling that it was in the minor's
best interests. If the parents and judge
refused consent, the abortion would not
be allowed.
The Supreme Court in 1973 legalized
-abortions, basing its ruling on women's
constitutional right of privacy. The
still-controversial decision said states
FR EE
to anyJewish
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may not interfere with a woman's
choice to have an abortion during the
first three months of pregnancy.
States may play a role in protecting
the woman's health in the pregnancy's
second trimester and may take steps to
protect fetal life in the final trimester,
the court said.
TWO YEARS AGO, the justices
struck down a Missouri law that gave
parents of unwed minors the power,
through denying consent, of disallowing
abortions.

OPENS TONIGHTI
WE-DDING
BY
FEDERICO GARCIA"LORCA
University Showcase
Productions
NOVEMBER 1-4
TRUEBLODD THEATRE 8PM
Tickets $2
at PTI? Office.
in the Michigan League 764.0450

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DEC. 2nd LSAT
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33900 Schoolcraft Rd.
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Livonia Michigan 48150

'Green, Pursell confront at Daily

(Continued fromPage 1)
dommittee hearings.
Greene added that Pursell vetoed a
bill which would have cut the defense
budget by five per cent. Pursell coun-
tered that the efense budget has only
ncreased by three per cent, and he
Toted that this is much lower than the
lation's inflation rate.
BOTH GREENE and Pursell agreed
:hat the United States should impose
economic sanctions against the South
African government. The 46-year-old
Republican representative said he sup-
ports holding congressional hearings in
Ann Arbor so that students advocating

divestiture from South Africa could
make their views known. He added that
he believes many 6f the members of
Congress would be against divestiture
simply because they aren't informed
enough about it.
The debate, the third between the two
candidates in seven days, did not
proceed entirely without them blasting
one another's leadership qualities and
promoting their own abilities.
Pursell, who has predicted that he
will receive the most substantial vic-
tory in the state, said he has received
strong support from many different

sections of the district.
"THIS IS ONE of the most diversified
districts in the state and we've done ex-
ceedingly well in each section. The
future of-the country will be in leaders.
who have that kind of diversity," he
said.
Pursell also maintained that he has a
'record unmatched by any other
freshman."
Greene, however, stressed the need
for "progressive leadership" and sai he
would make "real demands for
solutions and not cosmetic ones."

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