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October 29, 1978 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-29

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, October 29, 1978-Page 5

CANDIDA TES MEET IN TV BOUT:

Griffin, Levin attack inflation

l ...

By BRIAN BLANCHARD
Following three minutes of debate over which
candidate was more interested in future debate, in-
cumbent Senator Robert Griffin and Democratic
challenger Carl Levin spent close to an hour last
night repeating for a television audience what
they've been saying ever since the primaries.
In other words, inflation, tax-cutting, and Griffin's
commitment to a third term headed the list of issues,
:which also included varying views of Medicaid, den-
fense, abortion funding, nuclear energy, Jimmy Car-
ter, and Gerald Ford.
WITH GRIFFIN'S own polls showing the incum-
bent down four percentage points-up four from a
month ago in a different sampling by the same ser-
vice-both candidates are trying to turn debates to
their own advantage in the tight race.
With about a week left in the contest, Levin asked
Griffin last night to go on TV with him before out-
state, impartial audiences and Griffin said he
favored appearances in front of local interest groups.
In the first of two scheduled televised debates of
the campaign, carried on channel 7 (WXYZ-TV),
Griffin and Levin quarreled over methods for
reducing inflation. Levin supported President Car-
ter's new wage and price guidelines, while his
Republican candidate charged that the plan doesn't
address the deficit federal spending he feels is the

major cause of inflation.
CARTER, ACCORDING to Griffin, should call
Congress back into session after the election and con-
sider a constitutional amendment to balance the
federal budget within five years, a feat Griffin claims
Gerald Ford was much better suited for.
"One thing that President Carter neglected to men-
tion is that when he took over the White House in
January of 1977, the inflation rate under the Ford

r:C LnIi~v'7

administration had been brought down from twelve
per cent to 4.8 per cent," Griffin said.
Levin, a former Detroit City Council president,
responded that the deficit during Ford's term in of-
fice "was the highest we've ever had in this coun-
try." He acknowledged that deficit spending is a
cause of inflation. But, Levin added, "I don't think
that Senator Griffin can point to a time when he had
power in Washington as a time when there was no
deficit spending."
Griffin followed Levin's comment by charging
Democratic-controlled Congress with much of the
deficit spending under Ford. He added, in reference
to Levin: "I don't think we need any more spenders
and liberals in the Congress."

Answering questions from journalists from the
Associated Press, United Press International and
WXYZ news, the candidates agreed that the recently
passed tax-cut bill is, in Levin's words, "barely bet-
ter than nothing" in the way of aid for income tax-
payers.
Just as Griffin had suggested Carter call Congress
back to make some more "dramatic" action on in-
flation, Levin suggested the president take the same
action to "patch-up" the tax-cut bill.
"It's an unfair tax bill, per se," said Levin. "It's a
little better thar what we have but it's not nearly
good enough and Congress ought to come back into
session and repair it."
Griffin took the opportunity to bring attention to
the tax-indexing bill he has made one of the main
selling points of his campaign. The bill, with bipar-
tisan support in the Senate, would automatically ad-
just tax brackets to account for cost of living in-
creases.
In the area of nuclear energy, they contined a run-
ning argument about the safety of nuclear waste
disposal. For the first time yesterday, however, Grif-
fin said the state should be considered as a disposal
site for the waste.
Levin suggested that, since there is no safe way to
get rid of the waste, there should be a moritorium on
the construction of new plants.

HALL OWEEN
at the
Stag Door Restaurant
TUESDAY OCTOER 31
* Happy hour begins at 6:00 p.m.
Lasts all night-25C OFF ALL DRINKS
*APrizes for best costumes
\ Stae Door Res taurant
ACROSS FROM HILL AUDITORIUM

"THE GREATEST MAGIC SHOW IN A QUARTER OF A CENTURY"-L.A TIMES

Soviet ship
rescues P-3
survivors
By AP and UPI
HONOLULU-Ten survivors of the
crash of a U.S. Navy surveillance plane
were headed towards the Soviet Union
yesterday aboard a Russian trawler.
The survivors and five others .crashed
in icy North Pacific waters in a P-3
Orion less than 300 miles from Siberia.
Bodies of three were recovered by the
trawler MVS Senyavina and two others
were still missing.
The P-3 was a four-engine turboprop
loaded with equipment to track Soviet
ships and eavesdrop on Soviet military
communications. The plane was dit-
ched Thursday because of electrical
and hydraulic failure 230 miles south-
west of Attu Island at the end of the
Aleutian island chain.
Museum grant
More area students will have an op-
portunity to visit the University
Museum of Art because of a $2,500
grant recently awarded to the museum
of the Michigan Council for the Arts, the
University announced.
The Docent Board of the museum
said it hopes to expand its regular tour
program with the money designated as
a transportation fund for elementary,
junior high and high school students.
Money to help pay for busing the
students to the museum will be
allocated to schools each month on a
first-come, first-served basis.

SUNDAY OCTOBER 29
2pum. & 7p.m.
POWER CENTER
TICKETS FROM $6.00-$10.00
CHILDREN IAGE12 AND UNDER11/2 PRICE!!
Power Center Box Office, w
Open Sunday at 12 noon,
763-3333
Man Of
La Mach0-
A MUSKET PRESENTATION
TICKET ORDER FORM
Circle date tickets desired:
November 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 10 at 8 p.m. $4.50-center orchestra and balcony
November 5 at 2 p.m. $4.00-side orchestra and balcony
November I1 at 2 p.m. and 9 p.m. - tickets 1 $_ _ or a total of S

Name

Phone

Daily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG

With the greatest of ease

Address
City State Zip
Mail order with stamped, self-addressed envelope and check payable to UAC-
MUSKET, 530 S. State St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
Phone 763-1107forfurther information.

An alumni cheerleader was up to his old tricks during yesterday's homecoming
the fans he hasn't lost his touch.

game against Minnesota, proving to all

Group offers jobs abroad

The word honeymoon comes from the
old German custom of drinking mead, a
brew of honey, malt and yeast, for 30
days, after a wedding.

(Continued from Page 1)"
Each AIESEC branch has a commit-
tee here responsible-for helping local
students secure internships abroad,
and welcoming foreign exchange inter-
ns to the city where they will work.
"THEY TOOK CARE of me socially
and culturally," DeWitt said of the
Netherlands group. "They always had
something planned for all the studen-
ts.,r'.
DeWitt and the other summer interns
were not only provided with housing,
but were treated to weekends of'fishing
trips, sailing excurisions, and other
social activities.
"The whole summer was an in-
credible social and cultural vacation-
type experience," he said. "The work
was valuable and the country was a
pleasant change of surroundings."
DeWITT'S WORK for IBM was a
market research study. He completed
his project with a 70 page report.
In exchange for the privilege of par-
ticipating in the program, each com-
mittee has the responsibility of
securing area jobs for foreign students.
Local committee members contact
businesses and encourage them to take
on an intern.

A company which decides to hire a
foreign intern pays AIESEC $400 for
handling the computerized selection of
the foreign student and processing the
necessary governmental paperwork
allowing the student into the country.
THE BUSINESS also pays the intern
$125-175 per week for living expenses.
The student pays for his or her own
transportation.
Locally, such companies as K-Mart
and Amway hire foreign interns
through AIESEC. There are three
foreign students-from Belgium,
Brazil, and Germany-presently
working in Michigan.
There are currently some 30-35 active
members in AIESECs local chapter,
from Literary College sophomores to
graduate students. The group en-
courages all interested students to look
into AIESEC's activities, by calling
membership chairman Bob Savoie, 994-
6306.
The wolverine is so dangerous and
wily that the best-dressed Eskimos are
the ones wearing the most wolverine
skin.

ROMAN POLANSKI

1966

CUL DE SAC
A tale of a whimpering asexual whose gorgeous wife loves him enough to dress
him in her nighties. Interrupting this strange form of bliss is a gangster needing
a hideout. Mean and sadistic or slapstick comedy depending on your per-
spective. Berlin Film Festival-Best Film Award. Polanski still thinks it is his
best film. With DONALD PLEASANCE, FRANCOIS PRORLEAC, JACK MAC-
GOWRON & JACQUELINE BISSET.
WED: Alain Tanner's RETURN TO AFRICA

G4
to

CINEMA I

TONIGHT AT
7A9

ANGELL AUD. A.
$1.50

LOGO CONTEST!
Design logo for Cinema I (to be used on our film schedules 8 posters) & WIN
free admission for two at all our winter films. DEADLINE Nov. 7th. Send
entries (as many as you want) to LOGO CONTEST, Cinema 11, c/o 909 Church
St., Apt. No. 2, Ann Arbor, MI48104.

/

et it
gether.
u z2
-
Burning the midnight oil can be tough on your eyesight,
pookie. (Didn't you know Ulrich's carries a full line of Luxo
lamps?) And you say you missed that 8:00 class AGAIN?
(Ulrich's has alarm clocks, too -- or they can fix your old
one.) And your roommate insists he CAN TOO hitchhike
to Katmandu? (Get him a globe at Ulrich's. Maybe it'll
help.)

WERNER HERZOG'S

1971

LAND OF SILENCE & DARKNESS
Inspired by the undefeatable spirit of the physically and emotionally handi-
capped, Herzog expresses his personal loneliness through the biography of
Fini Straubinger, a remarkable 56-year-old blind woman. We view the world of
silence and darkness which not only consumes her world but reaches the
depths of human consciousness. In German.
TUES: FRITZ LAN DOUBLE FEATURE

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00.9:00

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

The Ann Arbor Film Coepert$ive presents at Nat. Sci. Aud.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 30 ADMISSION FREE
MY DARLING CLEMENTINE
(John Ford, 1946) 7 only-NAT. SCI.
A keystone John Ford western through which flow many of the themes and
.a sthntwere hrn in STAGECOACH and culminated in THE MAN WHO

I

Ulrich's has everything you need, including
prices in town (they guarantee it)!

the lowest

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