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October 29, 1978 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-29

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Page 2-Sunday, October 29, 1978-The Michigan Daily

WHAT IN THE WORLD
DO YOU HAVE IN COMMON WITH
CO~RESSIAN

Nader lobby charges big
business runs Congress

CARL

PURSELL?

i

(Well, besides the fact he just
hod his bike ripped off)

WASHINGTON (AP)-Ralph Nader's
lobbyists assailed yesterday what they
called "a corporate Congress" whose
just-concluded 95th session they say
was marked by big business victories
over consumers in virtually every
legislative battle.
Nader's Congress Watch
organization said consumers won on
some major issues during the
lawmaking session that ended Oct. 15,
but never over the opposition of big
business lobbying.
"CORPORATE AMERICA, if one
studies the votes, seems to exercise a
de facto veto on policies they find objec-
tionable," said Mark Green, director of
Congress Watch. "If business lobbies
don't object, consumer measures
become law. If they do, they don't," he
said.
Green attributed big business success
during the 95th congress to money, an
anti-government sentiment in the coun-
try and solidarity by Republicans on
those consumer bills that were
defeated.
Green said corporations have
drastically increased the number of

political action committees established
legally to funnel contributions to can-
didates. He said these donations pay big
dividends when congressional votes are
taken.
AS FOR anti-government sentiment,
Green said, "Congress is a fish swarm,
darting in the same direction at the
slightest disturbance. This year
California's Proposition 13 surely made
a bigger splash than consumer
groups."
And he noted that Republicans stood
together in opposing some major con-
sumer bills, adding that the measure
died largely because Democratic Party
unity on Capitol Hill broke down.
Green said consumer groups won on
federal aid to consumer cooperatives,
airline deregulations, aid bankruptcy
and creditor legislation. He noted,
however, that none of these bills was
opposed by big business lobbyists.
BUT GREEN also said losses came
on a proposed federal consumer protec-
tion agency, and on the natural gas
pricing and tax issues.
"On all, the big business community
by and large worked hard and

together," he said.
Green issued the assessment wh
releasing Congress Watch's rating
the voting record of each senator an
House member where consumer issi
were concerned the last two years.
In the Senate, Howard Metzenbau
(D-Ohio) scored highest with 98 pg
cent of his votes being designated a
pro-consumer. Next were Sens. Ed
ward Kennedy (D-Mass), with 93 pe
cent; Paul Sarbanes (D-Md.), with O
per cent, and Dick Clark (D-Iowa), witi
88 per cent.
HOUSE LEADERS, according to ti
rankings of the Nader organizati
were Elizabeth Holtzman (D-N.Y.) an
Robert Drinan (D-Mass.), each with
per cent.
The lowest Senate ranking went
Milton Young (R-N.D.), at 10 per cerl
Clustered at 13 per cent were Sens. Te
Stevens (R-Alaska); James McClu
(R-Idaho); Carl Curtis (R-Neb.); Cli
ford Hanson (R-Wyo.); Jesse Helms (
N.C.), and John Tower (R-Texas).
The lowest House score on consume
issues went to Rep. Arlan Strangelan
(R-Minn.), with 3 per cent.

THE FIRST THING THAT
GETS TO YOU ABOUT
CARL PURSELL .;. . IS
THAT YOU CAN GET
TO HIM.
He's accessible to both students
and faculty. And unlike most
elected officials, he listens more
than he talks. r
Some of the 2nd District students
supporting Carl have worked in his cam-
paigns, some have been interns in his
office, others met him through work on
various issues.
Our conclusion is that Carl Pursell is an
uncommon Congressman. He really rep-
resents the campus communities in our
district. He really considers students to
be full constitutents who deserve the
full assistance of a congressional office
and whose opinions, deserve full con-
sideration in policy decisions.
All of which is fine to say. But you don't
stay in Congress by just talking. The
record defines the man. And it's in Carl's
record that students can find solid evi-
dence of the common ground we share
with our Congressman.

LOSING THE BATTLE AGAINST THE MARK:
GIs suffer from dollar

S

fall

k,;>
{
:;
t
a
z

rS
S ,
aS
t
o

PEACE: Voted against B-1 Bomber (and
held open forum prior to vote on U. of M.
campus); voted against Neutron Bomb;
supports strong overall U.S. defense as
essential for world peace.
HUMAN RIGHTS: Supports efforts to
improve human rights worldwide; active
critic of oppression of dissidents in Rus-
sia; voted to continue arms sale em-
bargo of Turkey; supports African ma-
jority rule.
EQUALITY: Voted to extend ERA ratifi-
cation time and voted against allowing
states to rescind ratification; supported
Michigan ERA ratification as State Sen-
ator.
CONSUMERS: Voted for Consumer Pro-
tection Agency; voted to create Con-
sumer Co-op Bank to help cooperatives
through government loans (and the bill
passed the House by that single vote).
ETHICS: Voted for stronger congres-
sional ethics legislation.
To meet Carl Pursell is to meet a very
decent guy. Sincere. Low-key. About as
lacking in pretense as any public official
you'll ever find. Knowledgeable about
issues and what makes government
work.
And he goes out of his way to share his
knowledge. Ask the student nurses who
sought Carl's help to fight off adminis-
tration-proposed cuts in nursing educa-
tion. In addition to personal support,
they got expert advice on how to most
effectively press their case, and excel-
lent follow-through.
Carl's approach to policy decisions in-
volves intense "homework" and fair con-
sideration of all viewpoints. Unlike typi-
cal politicians, he doesn't make instant
judgments, then close his mind to fur-
ther analysis.
Oh. About the bike.
That's how Carl gets to work on Capitol
Hill in Washington. At least he did until
somebody stole it right in front of his
congressional office building. (Where
are the FBI and CIA when you really
need them?) Now he's on foot. So much
for the trappings of office.
Look. Pursell isn't perfect.
We don't pretend he is.
And we don't pretend we
agree with everything he's
ever said or done.
But Carl does have an ex-
cellent record, with a great
deal of common ground
with people in our univer-
sity community. He's earn-
ed our respect. He's earned
our support.
Pursell-Congress Committee:
Coordinator. TERRI CORBIN, INGRID SMITH, BILL
ARK EBERBACH, DAVE FANTERA, DEBBIE HAUPT,
TERSON, JOHN SCHAAL, DAVE WEINSTEIN, BETH

BONN, West Germany (AP)-Despite
used-furniture handouts, air base vege-
table gardens and other economizing,
the dollar's plunge against the West
German mark is twisting already tight
financial screws even tighter for U.S.
military families here.
New cost-of-living and housing
allowances by the U.S.agovernment
have eased the worst cases of GI pover-
ty-cases that provoked German sym-
pathy gifts of food and money earlier
this year.
MANYrAMERICAN families long ago
gave up thethought of eating out in a

German restaurant as they watched the
U.S. currency fall lower and lower
against the mark. Now a dollar, which
has dropped more than 10 per cent in
the past month, won't even buy a cup of
coffee in the average restaurant.
The dollar, which at is post-war high
was worth 4.20 marks, stood at 2.30
marks a year ago, declined .to 1.94 in
late September and plunged almost 20
pfennings further in less than a month
to 1.76 marks on Friday. A cup of coffee
costs an average of 1.80 marks in Ger-
man restaurants.
As a result, American servicemen

are spending more time on base, when
prices at the movie theater or in thi
U.S. government-run departmeni
stores and supermarkets are in dollar
and usually cheaper than in the United
States. f
"IT'S HAVING a negative effect on
the morale of soldiers," said Maj. Jolin
Harrington, spokesman for the 3rd If-
fantry Division in Wherzburg, whete
45,000soldiers.and their relatives live.
"Our commanders are having to spew
a lot more of their time easing
problems for dependent families."
One sign of the pinch has been a
per cent increase in Army Emergnen
Relief loans and grants to soliders ir
Europe-most of them in Germany. An
Army spokesman said the financial aid
has risen from $495,000 in the first six
months of 1977 to $647,000 in the first
half of this year.
NEHi+'ds U' center
The University's capital campaig-
for its centers for Japanese and Chine
studies was awarded a $900,0
challenge grant by the National E
dowment for the Humanities (NEH,
the University announced.
The campaign seeks to raise a $6
million endowment to support th
University's teaching and research ae
tivities which produce much of the
nation's basic knowledge about Asia.
THlE MICHIIGAlNDAIlLY
Volume IexxxIX, No. 46
Sunday, October 29, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the Universi
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second Olas
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 4810.
Published daily-Tuesday through Sunday mornin
during the University year at 420 Maynard Stree
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates; $i
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mai
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published through Satutda
morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor
$7.00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

CAREER DEVELOPMENT: Ranks wider
career opportunities alongside alterna-
tive energy sources as the greatest
priorities for the future.
EDUCATION: Voted for college tuition
tax credits, and helped Mich. students
testify before House Ways and Means
Committee on the issues; co-sponsored
legislation to increase student grants
and loans.
ENERGY: National leader in drive for
alternative energy sources; sponsored
successful amendments to accelerate
fusion energy research; author of major
bill for rapid development of fusion,
solar, geothermal, biomass and other
new energy sources.
ENVIRONMENT: Co-sponsored National
Bottle Bill; supported Alaska lands pres-
ervation and Redwood Park expansion;
sponsoring endangered species bill.
U. of M. Student Members,
SCOTT WINKLER, Coordinator; CHIP FOWLER,
BERRY, JOHN CAROSSO, STEPHEN COGUT, M
STEVE JOHNSON, PAM McMANAMA, TERRI PE
BABINGTON.

CLASSES NOW
FORMING FOR
DEC. 2nd LSAT
CALL or WRITE

university L.S.A.T. Preparation Service
1-261-LSAT in Livonia
33900 Schooicraft Rd.
Suite G-2
Livonia, Michigan 48150

'(jIVE SITY cMUSICAL 8OCIETY presen t,5

Murray
LENAilA,

pianist

His performance was one of the most talked
about recitals last season! Don't miss this
brilliant young pianist's encore recital playing
Mozart's Sonata in D major, K. 576;

RaIElr4 '% - - _ EIk- - - II

m

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