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October 28, 1978 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Mic
FIRST RADIO CONTROLLED RACE TRACK IN STATE:

higan Daily-Saturday, October 28, 1978-Page 3,

irYC'tSEE NE KPECLLZDAJ
Night Owl Howls
Eastern Daylight Savings time ends Sunday morning at 2. And,
because the sun sets each day earlier and earlier, the Night Owl bus
will begin regular service on Monday. The bus will make runs seven
nights a week from 7 p.m. to 12:30/a.m., excluding vacations. The
Night Owl is scheduled to leave every 30 minutes from the bus stop in
front of the UGLI. The basic route is through the Cambridge Street
area as far east as Oxford Housing and as far north as 'U' Hospital.
Maps of the complete route can be picked up in the lobby of the LSA
building and at Oxford Housing.
Take ten
The administrative assistant to Sen. Eugene McCarthy announced
the evening of Oct. 28, 1968, that the former presidential candidate
would endorse Hubert Humphrey in the race against Nixon. Also that
day, Francois Mitterland, then leader of the French Coalition of the
Left, who ran unsuccessfully in the '78 French spring elections, came
to campus as part of the Controversy '68 lecture series. "We of the
French left feel that De Gaulle's nationalist policies are intelligent,
but just a bit retarded," said Mitterland in French, which was
immediately translated into English. He charged that De Gaulle's
policies are unoriginal and "don't correspond to the givens of this
century."
Happenings .. .
...Homecoming activities kick off the day, with the Homecoming
Parade starting at 9 a.m. on Main and Packard. . . the Mudbowl slops
underway at 10 on the corner of South University and
Washtenaw. . . the Ann Arbor War dissidents will be having a brown
bag lunch in the lounge of the 1st United Methodist Church at
noon ... 2 p.m. brings the "Rhyme Space" poetry reading to the
second floor of the Union. . . anyone interested in becoming a
contestant in Ann Arbor's version of "The Dating Game" should meet
in Room 126 in the East Quad this afternoon at 4.. . after the footbal
game is the 50th anniversary celebration of the Intramural sports
building with a dedication, "A Touch of Gold" at 606 E. Hoover,
running until midnight. . . the University Officer Education program
is sponsoring a haunted house at North Hall on N. University, from 7-
10 p.m.; all children under ten must be accompanied by adults . . . 8
p.m. brings two musical events: Joan Morris, William Bolcom, Connie
Barron, and the Contemporary Directions Ensemble will perform at
Rackham auditorium, and Michigan Bandstand '58 will rock when the
clock hits 8.. . shalom.
Shake your bookies
The next time you want some cheerleaders to scream wildly as you
complete your fourth mid-term in record time, you can call up the
Richmond, Virginia, Chimborazo Elementary School. When the
cheerleaders at Chimborazo lead the rah-rah-rahs at the pep rallies,
they're urging their classmates onto victory over a paper foe -
standardized achievement tests. "If the whole student bodies can get
inspired for a coming game, why not for a test?" asks the Chimborazo
school principal. Why not? Maybe Michigan should try it - ok, folks,
all together: "Sine, cosine,sine, 3.14159!"
0I
On the outside ...
Homecoming football fans will be bathed by blue skies and warm
weather today. The weather service predicts that the mercury should
reach 50 degrees, and will hit a low of 34. No rain is predicted over the
weekend. Go blue skies.

I

A

unique way to smash up cars

By JOE VARGO
The race car enters the straightaway
going full tilt. It is pursued by three
others, all desperate to overtake it.
Suddenly, without warning, the car
slams into the wall at full speed. The
three pursuers, unable to avoid
disaster, also crash at full speed.
What had a second earlier been four
precision, well-oiled racing machines is
now a pile of twisted metal and burned
rubber. Another spectacular, tragic
and all to frequent racing accident had
just occurred, causing hundreds of
'Teenagers love to come
and race because they
can't afford to own a race
car. So for about two
dollars (the cost of a 15

minute run), they can
have the feel of handling
a racer.' -Len Abbeduto,
owner of Abbey's
Radio controlled
Race Track
thousands of dollars in damages and
claiming several lives. Right?
WELL, NOT exactly. The crash that
just occurred didn't happen at
Indianapolis or Daytona Beach. It
happened in Ann Arbor. The race cars
were not powered by hundreds of
horses costing thousands of dollars.
Instead, they were powered by four one
and a quarter volt batteries, costing
about $35.00 each.
No drivers were in the cars, but
Daily Official Bulletin
CAREER PLANNING AND
PLACEMENT
3200 S.A.B.
The Burke Marketing Research Award combines
grad study in marketing at U. of Cincinnati with on-
the-job training at Burke. Burke assumes cost of
tuition.
Dumbarton Oaks Fellowships 1979-80: Junion
Fellowships for students writing their dissertations
or Fellowships for PhD's who wish to pursue resear-
ch in history of landscape architecture and related
fields of garden design and garden ornament and
history of horticulture.
A career fair sponsored by Greater Cleveland
Growth Assoc. will be held during Christmas
Holidays. Students graduating in 1978-79 invited to
interfiew with Cleveland employers. No fee.
Newspaper Fund internships and Scholarships for
College Students. Editing Internship gives 40 studen-
ts opportunity to work for a summer on daily
newspaper and wire service copydesks.
Minority Internship Program - Students enrolled
in post-graduate work and have interest and talent in
news reporting and editing. This program will in,
volve 10 minority students from both journalism and
non-journalsm areas.
Interviewing on campus:
November 6 and 7: Grad school and Career Con-
ference for minority students.
November 7: Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co.,
Center for Naval Analyses, Cargill, Inc.
November 8: McMaster-Carr Supple co., NCR
Corp., PAR Corp., Battelle Columbus Laboratories,
Indiana School of Business,.
November 9: Shillito's, IBM, New York Life Ins.
Co.
November 10: Harvard Grad. School of Business.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB 7634117
Center for Renewable Resources and the Solar
Lobby, Washington, D.C. Summer intern program
for students with skills in writing, research,
economics, interest in politics. Further details
available.
Grenfield village/Ford Museum, Dearborn.
Openings for guides for coming summer. Must be
over 18. Deadline for applying, Jan. 5. Details
available.
Philip Morris Marketing/Communications Com-
petition. Program open to undergrads/grads.
Fields: adfvertising, college relations, community
relations. Deadline Dec. 15. Further details
available.

Family, work
conference planned
New research on the "Changing
Family, Changing Workplace" will be
the focus of a conference to be held Nov.
6 in Rackham Amphitheatre at the
University.
Sponsored by the Center for Con-
tinuing Education of Women (CEW),
the series of talks is scheduled from
9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and are open to the
public without charge.
Psychology Prof. Elizabeth Douvan
will lead the morning session with an
address on "The American Family in a
20-year Perspective." Regula Herzog,
research scientist in the Institute for
Social Research (ISR), will discuss
"High School Senior Students'
Preferences for Division of Labor in the
Family, 1977."
Also, economics Prof. Deborah
Freedman and ISR research scientist
Arland Thornton will'discuss "Changes
in Sex Role Attitudes of Women" from a
15-year panel study, and two CEW
researchers, Jean Manis and Hazel
Markus, will report on "Families,
Careers and Self-Evaluation: Views
from Different Points of the Life
Cycle."
The afternoon session, convening at
1:45 p.m., will include history Prof.
Louise Tilly speaking on "Women,
Work and Family: a Historical
Framework," and ISR research scien-
tist Robert Kahn discussing "Work,
Stress and Social Supports." At 3:30
p.m. a panel of researchers, clinicians
and consultants will explore various
ways to study the changing family and
workplace through various research
approaches.
Looking for s mte?
Advertise in the
Personals

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIX, No. 45
Saturday. October :8. 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published through Saturday
morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

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