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October 22, 1978 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-22

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I

Page 8-Sunday, October 22, 1978-The Michigan Daily
Leach back

In

form
rolls

-as
(Continued from Page 1)
ball 52 yards into the Pndzone.
Willner also had punts of 38, 46 and 66
yards. When he had the wind to his back
he belted the ball long and deep, and
when the wind was in his face, Willner
placed his kicks. As a result, Wisconsin
was prievented from starting any drive
past their own 20-yard line.
Badger coach Dave McClain was
obviously disappointed by the loss, his
first since taking over as head coach in
the spring. "When you get beaten like
that, there is not much to say. Michigan

4ichigan

is a good football team. They are a lot
better than we are. That (Michigan's
football success) is what we are trying
to achieve."
The Wolverines scored their second
touchdown on a bit of razzle-dazzle,
using a wingback reverse play that had
rarely been used in recent seasons. On
second down and seven from the
Wisconsin 27, Rick Leach slipped the
ball behind him into the waiting arms of
Ralph Clayton. Clayton walked a
tightrope down the sidelines all the way
for the score.

There was some momentary
confusion on the play, as it appeared
that one official marked Clayton out of
bounds at the 18-yard-line. But three
other officials signaled touchdown and
the score stood at 14-0.
"I'VE NEVER been beaten this
badly," said McClain. "One time at
Miami of Ohio, Purdue blew us out, 39-
0. That was when Bo was my head
coach. You see, it even happens to
him."
. Many thought Wisconsin's only hope
to upset the Wolverines would be by
passing as MSU did. The Badger
quarterback threw twenty times, but
some thought it wasn't enough. "We
tried to pass, but we kept on getting
flushed out of the pocket. It must have
happened seven or eight times," said
McClain.
Schembechler probably worked his
troops hard on that aspect of the game
after what the Spartans did to his team
last week. Bo said practice this week
was ". . . a. little more somber -
'determined' would be a good word, a
very good word."
IT MUST have been a worthwhile
week of practice as the relentless
defense pressured Kalasmiki and his
subsequent replacement, freshman QB
John Josten.
After the game Kalasmiki dejectedly
spoke about the rout. "It's not fun, it's
embarrassing. You hope for the clock to
run out." Actually, Kalasmiki
performed well. He was able to move
the ball a few times, but somehow there
was yet another obstacle in the way
which kept the Badgers from putting
any points on the board.
Kalasmiki's Michigan counterpart
played just as well, but had the breaks
going his way. Leach was 4 of 7 for 101
yards, one touchdown and no
interceptions. The senior also ran for 82
yards and scored twice. But the largest
statistical chunks came on two plays.
On the second play of the third

quarter, Leach kept the ball on an
option, made three beautiful cuts and
raced down the field for 44 yards. The
run set up Michigan's fourth -TD of the
day, with Leach taking it in himself
from the six.
THE WOLVERINES padded their
lead to 35-0 when Leach tossed a bomb
to a wide-open Clayton for 65 yards, the
longest play from the line of scrimmage
for Michigan ithis year. Ironically, the
pair attempted the same play earlier,
but Leach overthrew Clayton.
The final score came early in the
fourth quarter as Schembechler pulled
his starters and received fine
performances from quarterback B. J.
Dickey and speedy freshman tailback
Butch Woolfolk. Woolfolk responded in
his first game with 32 yards in six
carries.
All of Schembechler's experiments
paid off as he even started the game
with a restructured defense. Bo shifted
many of the players to different
positions. The change of scenery
apparently worked, as the Wolverines
gained their third shutout in six games.
Big Ten

Campbell's Scoop
by Paul Campbell
The victory formula...
. back to basics
MADISON
T HE TRIPLE offense and a rugged defense against the run - like it or not,
these two things have been Michigan's bread and butter since Bo
Scnembechler brought back winning football ten years ago. But last week,
maybe for the first time in those years, Bo forgot about the basics. He tried
to get fancy, which in his terms means passing too much. And worrying too
much about being passed against.
Well, the basics are back. They were stressed a'll week in practice and
all day on the field yesterday. It's the only way Bo knows how to win. It's the
system which he called on in the second half against Arizona. It's the system
he revived a bit too late against State. It's the system the Michigan players
know best.
"We wanted to power our way up the middle," is how Rick Leach
described his team's game plan.
"We played heavy defense concentrating on the run," was defensive
captain Jerry Meter's assessment from the other side of the line. "We
wanted to get back to good, basic football, so we used a good, solid, running
defense."
The power game plan showed up in the statistics. Michigan ran the ball
65 times, passing only on eight occasions. The Wolverines traveled 360 yards
on the ground, while gaining 117 yards on five complete passes.
On defense, the Wolverines cut the effectiveness of the opponents'
running game by almost half from last week, giving up only 133 yards.
Wisconsin coach Dave McClain complimented the Michigan line on
* pressuring his quarterback out of the pocket, where Ed Smith spent so much
unmolested time a week ago. Finally, the defensive backs were close enough
to the line to be involved in 22 tackles.
If the numbers don't ring a bell, the trends they indicate do, because
yesterday's stats are virtually interchangeable with figures from countless
Bo-coached games at Michigan. In fact, the game itself was an indistinct
blend of many of Schembechler's past triumphs.
The most familiar sight was Leach taking the snap and turning parallel
to the line, faking to his fullback, and either turning up field himself or
pitching to his trailing back. He's been doing it for 42 games now, and there's
no doubt he does it well.
"Leach is a great leader and makes some great leads on the option,"
said McClain after the game. "He's great at stringing it out, and he's really
heady."
So, as long as Leach is calling the signals, the option offense is
Michigan's best bet. The people who knock Bo for insufficient passing
probably get the same empty feeling I do whenever Leach cocks his arm to
throw.
Still, the triple option and basic defense aren't cure alls for the problems
that became obvious last week. Nor is the 42-0 victory over Wisconsin, who's
coac-h readily admits that the Wolverines are simply a superior team.
"We've got a long way to go," Schembechler said. "I don't think we were
great today, but we needed this game. It was a good confidence-builder."
The Badgers did almost as much as Michigan itself to boost that
confidence. They made the same type of crucial early mistakes that doomed
the Wolverines in last week's loss. Michigan only lost the ball once, and that
came long after the issue was decided.
But Wisconsin was moving the ball effectively before those two fumbles.
Obviously, Michigan can't count on everyone to be so generous. Nor will they
be able to simply rely on their strength to dominate talented teams like
Purdue and Ohio State.
"We made too many mental mistakes," admitted linebacker Ron
Simpkins, who once again led the Wolverines in tackles. "Sure, it's rrice to
have a shut-out, but we have to improve."

Standings
Conference
W L T W
Purdue.......... 3 0 0 5
MICHIGAN ..... 2 1 0 5
Ohio State ........2 1 0 3
Michigan State .. 2 1 0 3
Minnesota........2 1 0 3
Wisconsin........2 1 1 4
Indiana..........1 2 0 2
Iowa ............ 1 2 0 1
Illinois.........0 1 3 1
Northwestern ... 0 4 1 0
Next Saturday's Games
Minnesota at MICHIGAN
Wisconsin at Michigan State
Northwestern at Ohio State
Purdue at Iowa
Illinois at Indiana

All

L'
1
1
2
3
3
1
4
5
4
6

T
0
0
1
0
I 0
1
0
0
2'
I

AP Photo
MICHIGAN TAILBACK Roosevelt Smith takes a hard plunge onto the Camp
Randall Stadium turf, but not before picking up one of 25 Wolverine first downs in
the Wolverines' 42-0 rout of Wisconsin. Smith suffered a shoulder injury in the
second half, however, and may miss Saturday's game with Minnesota.

DAVIS, SMITH SIDELINED
Bo battles injury nemesis
By CUB SCHWARTZ

I -J ---- v

Special to the Daily
MADISON-At this point, it is entirely unclear
ho Bo Schembechler's adversary is next week. On
>ne hand, the Minnesota Gophers will visit Michigan
Stadium for a shot at removing the Wolverines from
he run for the roses. But on the other hand, Schem-
bechler is faced with an even stickier opponent-
njuries.
The addition of starting fullback Russell Davis and
)ften-used reserve Roosevelt Smith and Ed
Kasparek to the, ranks- of the hobbled brings the
Zurrent casualty count to seven. The trio is joined in
njury by Mel Owens, Bill Dufek, John Powers and
stanley Edwards.
With their backs pinned to the wall, the Wolverines
annot even afforda tie. And now, with a pair of pre-
eason All-Auiericans ailing, along with two starters
m the offensive line and three highly-regarded bench
hreats, Schembechler can only wonder about the
uture.
"In a lot of ways we are held together by band-
4ids," Schembechler said. "I don't know how much
longer we can hold out. Davis and Smith were hurt
today and we already lost Edwards."
Davis left the game early in the first quarter, the
-esult of what Schembechler labeled "banged up
nees." He had carried the ball only three times for a
:otal of nine yards.
The senior fullback did jog out to midfield for the
eeting of the captains'at halftime, but he limped
oticeably while walking on the sidelines during the

second half.
Smith, Harlan Huckleby's understudy at tailback,
suffered a shoulder injury in the second half. Schem-
bechler was unsure of the extent of either injury. "We
will just have to wait until next week and see," he
said.
Stanley Edwards, however, will definitely remain
out for a while longer. The sophomore taliback, who
injured a hamstring prior to the season opener, at-
tempted an early comeback at practice this week af-
ter only four weeks rest. His hopes for an early return
were short-lived, as he aggravated the injury.
For more sports-
SeePage 7
So now, Schembechler is faced with a problem that,
appeared farthestirom his mind last August-that of
fielding a potent backfield. Today he turned to
Lawrence Reid in replacing the injured Davis and the
junior fullback responded well, with 53 yards in 13
carries.
Reid was impressive enough to deserve mention by
Wisconsin coach Dave McClain, who characterized
him as "a big, tough runner." But when he was told
that Reid weighs only 215 punds as compared to
Davis' 225 he remarked, "He sure runs a lot stronger
than 215."

Perhaps more surprising than Reid was the play of
freshman tailback Harold (Butch) Woolfolk, who
replaced Harlan Huckleby for much of the second
half. Schembechler stated earlier this year that he
planned to red-shirt this year's entire freshman
class. But the injury situation forced Schembechler
to turn to the promising runner.
Woolfolk, who can run the 100-yard dash in 9.5
seconds, utilized his speed both inside and out,
carrying the ball six times for 32 yards. His perfor-
mance made the injuries a little easier for Schem-
bechler to live with.
"We hadn't planned on using Woolfolk, but we had
to when both Russell Davis and Roosevelt Smith went
out with injuries," Schembechler explained. "We just
ran out of backs. Woolfolk is going to be a good one,
no question about it. He is big, quick and a hard run-
ner."
Another freshman, defensive back Brian Carpen-
ter, also saw considerable action. Although the Flint
native is listed as the second string left cornerback
behind junior Mike Jolly, his playing time has been
limited this season. Schembechler viewed the oppor-
tunity to give Carpenter some game experience more
a necessity than a luxury.
Thus, the problem of use is again with Michigan.
Last week it was the players in green and white who
cast a blow to the Maize and Blue title hopes. Next
week it may be the green players in the Maize and
Blue who determine just how serious a blow it was.

Two-year total: Us 98, Them 0

MICHIGAN
First downsI...........C24
Rushing (att/yd........65/360
Passing (att/comnt). 5/8/10
Passing yards......... 117
Total Offense.......... 477
Punts (no./av.........4/51.0
Fumbles (no./lost) .... 1-1
Penalties (no.yds) ..... 2-30
SCORING PLAYS

WISCONSIN
15
39/133
10/21/0
94
227
9/31.0
2-2
4-40

1st M-Leach, 1 yd. run (Wlner kick)
M-Clayton, 27 yrd. run (Winmer kick)
2ndM-Huckley,17yrd. run (Willner kick)
3rd M-Leach, 6 yd. run (Willner kick)
M-Clayton, 65yd. pass from Leach (Willner
kick)
4th M-Dickey.3yd. run (Wiliner kick)
SCORING
Michigan.................14 7 14 7-42
Wisconsin.................. 0 0 0 0- 0
RUSHING
MICHIGAN
ATT YDS AVG
Huckleby ........................18 98 5.4
Leach ........................... 12 82 6.8
Reid ............................ 13 53 4.1
Dickey .......................... 5 33 6.6
Woolfolk ....................... 6 32 5.3
Clayton ......................... 1 27 27.0
R. Smith ........................ 7 26 3.7
R. Davis ......................... 3 9 3.0

WISCONSIN
Matthews ...:..................
Stauss ..........................
Kalasmiki....................
Mohapp......................
Souza......................
Richardson..................
Cohee.....................
Cohee .......................
Josten.... ................
PASSING
MICHIGAN
ATT
Leach ....................7T
Dickey..................I
WISCONSIN
Kalasmiki.................17
Josten ..................... 3
Greene....................i1
RECEIVING
MICHIGAN
Clayton ......................
G. Johnson..................
Marsh ..:....................
Huckleby...................
WISCONSIN
Charles .........................
Sydnor ..........................
Souza...................
Braker....................
Stauss......................

18
6
9
1
I
1
2

61
35
21
5
3
2....
2
-1

3.4
5.8
2.3
7.0
5.0
3.0
2.0
-0.5

COM INT YDS
4 -0 101
1 0 16

10
0
0
NO.
2
I
1
4"
3
1'
i1
1

0
0
0
YDS
82
16
10
9

94
0
0

LP
65
16
10
9

36
38
10
9
1

LERG S GOAL BEATS BGSU:

Icers gain OT

win

OKLAHOMA ROLLS ON
Texas upsets third-ranked Hogs

By DAN PERRIN
Special to the Daily
BOWLING GREEN-It was just like last night. The
Bowling Green Falcons out-skated, out-checked, out-shot
and out-played the Michigan hockey team, yet the
Wolverines once again came up with the game-winner, 4-
3, in overtime.
This time, junior center Dan Lerg was the hero for the
dekers, scoring his first goal of the year 4:07 into the OT
period. Wolverine goalie Bob Sutton was named the
game's first star, deservedly so as he came up an amazing
51 saves, many of them from point blank range.
Michigan penalties marred the first period, giving
Bowling Green a one-man advantage much of the time.
With the Blue icers constantly on the defensive the
Falcons had little trouble keeping the puck in the
Wolverine zone.
TIME AND TIME again the BG stakers stormed the
Michigan net only to have the sophomore Sutton knock the
puck away in his Wolverine debut.
After a slew of rapid-fire shots, junior left wing Steve
Dawe finally notched a score for the Ohioans at 5:59.
Michigan turned things around in the second period,
generating an nffens that was not nresent in the initial

action. The Falcons controlled the puck much of the time
and tied the score when right winger John Markle, BG's
leading scorer last season, drilled a shot past Sutton at
3:29 of the period.
Even while playing like anything but a top-notch college
hockey team, Michigan managed to take the lead again
when right winger Mike Coffman buried the puck in the
Bowling Green net 16:08 into the period.
It looked like Coffman's goal would hold up for the Blue
icers until the Falcons' Mark Wells scored the tieing goal
with just 23 seconds left, forcing the game into overtime.
It was left up to Lerg to send Michigan home a winner,
as he beat Charko one-on-one. The undefeated icers will
put their 2-0 record on the line against Minnesota-Duluth
in a home series next weekend that opens WCHA play for
both teams.
The Ieers' edge
First Period
SCORING-1. BG-Dawe (Cotter, Pelland) 5:59. Penalties-BG-Markell
(cross checking) 1:50, M-Coffman (roughing) 2:39, M-Waymann (trip-
ping) 3:10, M-Waymann.(delay of game) 7:40, M-Brennan (holding) 11:35.
SSe nd PrIni

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) - Senior quar-
terback Randy McEachern fired three
touchdown passes, including two
scoring shots to Olympian Johnny
"Lam" Jones yesterday, lifting eighth-
ranked Texas to a 28-21 upset victory
over third-ranked Arkansas in a South-
west Conference football game.
McEachern flipped a four-yard
scoring pass to the swift Jones with 6:15
to play, and Texas safety Johnnie John-
son thwarted Arkansas' comeback at-
tempt, giving the Longhorns the vic-
tory.
Johnson intercepted a pass with 4:16
left, then batted away a desperation
fourth-down pass in the Longhorns' end
zone with 2:05 to go, preserving the
triumph before 78,000 fans in Memorial
Stadium and a regional television
audience.
Texas now is 5-1 and 3-0 in SWC play.
The Razorbacks, preseason SWC
favorites, are 4-1 and 1-1.

Kenny King added one on a 15-yard run.
Uwe von Schamann kicked field goals
of 25 and 26 yards and kept his NCAA
extra point record alive by booting four
conversions to make it 103 straight.
Alabama 30, Tenn. 17
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - Tight
end Tim Travis took wide pitches in for
two touchdowns yesterday to lead four-
th-ranked Alabama over fumble-
troubled Tennessee 30-17 in a
Southeastern Conference football
game.
Alabama's Crimson Tide used a pair
of Volunteer fumbles and an intercep-
tion to score three touchdowns and give
Coach Bear Bryant his eighth straight
victory over Tennessee. The Tide now
is 3-0 in conference and 5-1 overall.

Nebraska 52, Col. 14
BOULDER, Colo. (AP) - Fifth-
ranked Nebraska battered Colorado's
Big Eight-leading defense for 49
straight points, including two touch-
downs by I-back Rick Berns, to crush
the Buffaloes 52-14 yesterday.
The Cornhuskers rallied from a 14-3
first-quarter deficit to pull even at half-
time, then surged into the lead on Ber-
ns' 10-yard scoring run early in the
third quarter. Later in the period, Billy
Todd kicked his third field goal of the
game and quarterback Tom Sorley lof-
ted a 42-yard TD pass to tight end
Junior Miller for a 31-14 advantage.
Nebraska boosted its season record to
6-1 and Big Eight mark to 3-0. Colorado
is now 1-2 and 5-2 overall.

SCORES

MICHIGAN 42, Wisconsin 0
Purdue 13, Illinois 0
Michigan State 42, Indiana 14
Ohio State 31. Iowa 7

Navy 9, William & Mary 0
Maryland 39, Wake Forest 0
Notre Dame 38, Air Force 15
S Ca.oli.... ssiashini .

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