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October 21, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-21

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Page 2-Saturday, October 21, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Church Worship Services

ogby slams U.S. for
Palestinian rights stand

ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9:00 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon and 5:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High),
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School-9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 am. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study-7:30 p.m.
Koinonia
(A Bible Study for college students)
For information call 662-2756
Wilburn C. Hill and Larry Phillips,
Evangelists
Transportation: 662-9928
STUDENTS
Join us for Sunday School and Worship
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Packard & Stone School Road
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.'
Worship-1 :00 a.m.
For transportation-call 662-6253
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
8015. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.
No evening meal or program this
week.
Sunday Bible Study: Love and Jus-
tice-9:30 a.m.
Monday Night Bible Study on North
Campus-8:00 p.m.
Tuesday night study group on
Criminal Justice-7:30 p.m. in the
Lounge.
* * *.
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 South State St.
Rev Andrew Foster, Chaplain
SJNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS:
:11:00 a.m.-Bruch and Social Hour.
12:00 noon-Celebration of the Holy
Eucharist.
Canterbury Loft serves' Episcopal-
ians at the University of Michigan and
sponsors. -j5ograms in the arts which
have ethical or spiritual themes.

ANN ARBOR UNITARIAN
FELLOWSHIP
504 W. Huron
10:30 Sunday Morning, Oct. 22-
Topic title: "An Inside View of a Col-
lective Society," by Robert P. Weeks.
"Heresay is what the Minority be-
lives; it is the name given by the power-
ful to the doctrine of the weak."-R.G.
Ingersoll.
* * *
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
2535 Russell Street
Sunday School-10 a.m.
Morning Worship-11a.m:
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel free to call Pastor
Leonard Sheldon, 761-0580.
Affiliated with G.A.R.B.C.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
William M. Ferry
Carl R. Geider
Graham M. Patterson
Services of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00a.m.
Coffee hour at 12 noon.
Student Fellowship meets at 4:00
p.m.
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.-Campus Bible
Study in the French room.
* * .*
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
512 E. Huron St.-663-9376
W. 3wines Grant, Interim Minister
A. Theodore Kachel, Campus Minister
Worship-10 a.m.-"Render Unto the.
Lord" by Mr. Grant.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
A caring community vitally interest-
ed in students' personal and spiritual
well-being.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m..
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Intern: Carol Bennington
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E. Huron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Rev. Anne Broyles, Chaplain
Shirley Polakowski, Office Maager
Sunday-5:00-Song practice.
5:30-Worship followed by shared
meal.
Extensive programming for the cam-
pus community.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LCMS
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560 and 668-8720
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
Midweek Bible Study Thursday at
7:30p.m.
* * *
FIRST CHURCH OF NAZARENE
2780 Packard
Pastor, Francis Rouse
11 a.m.-Morning Worship.
7 p.m.-Evening Worship.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(One Block North of S. University and
Forest)
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10 a.m.-Service of Holy Communion.
6 pm.-Evening Worship.
The
Peace
corps is
alive and
well1 and
waiting
for you.
All your life you've
wanted to do something im-
portant for the world. Now a
lot of the world needs you to
do it. We need volunteers with
skills and all kinds of practical
knowledge. Call toll free:
800-424-8580.Pe c
corps

F 1A Public ServicecAoI
This Newspaper 8
' The Advertising Council
Recycle Your Daily

By STEVEN SHAER
Jim Zogby, chairman of the Pales-
tinian Human Rights Campaign based
in Washington, slammed America's
Mideast policy and said the present
conflicts are leading to a third world
war.
Zogby, who spoke in front of about
150 people last night at the Un-
dergraduate Library's multipurpose
room, said Camp David "ignored the
Palestinian people and the integrity of
the PLO." "It is a sham and an obstacle
to peace," he declared.
Zogby emphasized that American
foreign policy towards the Middle East
must be changed.
"I think Jimmy Carter is an ass; he's
a consistant ass," Zogby stated. "Camp
David is trying to build an American in-
fluence in the Middle East against the
interests of the, people in the area," he
added.
Zogby said there can be no peace in
the Middle East without full rights for

the Palestinians.
Ann Arbor is one of four midwestern
cities Zogby is visiting in order to speak
on behalf of his organization.
Referring to what he termed a
disregard of human rights to
Palestinians under Israeli rule, Zogby
stated that Israel "has no concern for
the Palestinian people. No matter what
happened to you in history does not
justify you in doing that to another
people," he said.
Zogby made several racist examples
of former and present Israeli gover-
nment officials.
"Abba Eban, lover of human-rights,
said at the U.N., 'What does the U.N.
know of human rights? It's an Arab-
Soviet bloc.' That's shit, a leader who
says lthis ought to be called what he is,"
Zogby said.
Zogby was asked a question on the
PLO's expressed goal for the destruc-
tion of Israel and whether this was an
obstacle to peace.
"Where does it say that," Zogby

asked. "When has Israel been commit-
ted to the rights of the Palestinians,"
Zogby answered.
At first denying the PLO covenant,
Zogby finally said that the covenant
says the destruction of the Zionist state.
"The Palestinians want a non-religious
state," he said.
Referring to Carter's campaign
pledge to not send military hardware to
countries violating human rights,
Zogby queried, "Sadat is a moderate?
Amnesty International says .there are
political prisoners in Egypt. A regime
of oppression exists in Egypt."
The reason Sadat was sent arns
Zogby said was that he was important
for United States interests in the area
and that he "put on a blue suit and
kissed the ass of the president."
Zogby said the United States in-
volvement in the Lebanese war was due
to an effort to squash the Palestinian
movement.

CARTER NAMES WARNKE SUCCESSOR:

SAL T II advancin

MOSCOW (AP) - Secretary of State
Syrus Vance is unlikely to complete a
new nuclear weapons limitation treaty
during his talks with Soviet leaders
tomorrow and Monday, but it should
become clear whether there can be an
agreement in principle, sources said
yesterday.
U.S. officials with Vance in Geneva,
where he met with his key arms ad-
visers, said another round may be
needed before an accord can be nailed
down. One of them rated chances at "no
better than 50-50."
BUT WESTERN sources here, who
declined to be identified, were not as
cautious and said trying to assign per-
centages to the outcome is not a useful
exercise.
Soviet sources say conclusion of a
new Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty
is only a question of time. They say a
meeting between President Leonid
Brezhnev and President Carter to sign
the treaty is a definite prospect before

the end of the year.
Agreement in principle on SALT II,
an elusive goal for six years, would give
the Carter administration another
boost to follow the Camp David accor-
ds, the Western sources pointed out.
MEANWHILE in Washington,
President Carter named retired Lt.
Gen. George Seignious II as successor
yesterday to Chief SALT negotiator
Paul Warnke who is resigning.
Seignious, currently president of The
Citadel in Charleston, S.C., said Carter
offered him the delicate negotiating
position in a telephone call Friday mor-
ning.
"As a citizen, I could not refuse,"
Seignious said. He said he intends, if
confirmed for the job by the Senate, to
remain in the position through Carter's
current term.
WARNKE, WHO survived a tough
fight for Senate confirmation after
being appointed by Carter, announced
on Oct. 10 his plans to resign. Warnke

slowly
now is traveling to Moscow with
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance for
what are expected to be among the last
in the ongoing series of Strategic Arms
Limitation negotiations with the Soviet
Union.
Warnke has said he thinks a SALT
treaty can be signed before the end of
the year.
Seignious said in a telephone inter-
,view that he is a firm supporter of the
emerging SALT II agreement, which he
helped negotiate as a part-time
delegate-at-large to the talks in
Geneva.
"I certainly can support it. I think
that in recent months great progress
has been made toward making a treaty
of equity and equality," he said.
Seignious declined to. comment in
detail about his views on other arms
control issues. "I've been on a tread-
mill the last few days, and I'd like to
think things through a bit so I can ar-
ticulate them clearly," he said.

WIM WENDERS'

Gays find support at teach-in

1977

THE AMERICAN FRIEND
Wenders' newest and greatest feature film is a parade of great movie
directors: Nicholas Ray, Jean Eustoche, Samuel Fuller and Dennis Hopper
as the American-friend., Scenery includes Paris, Hamburg and New York
in a blur of subways, streets, wharves and automobiles. (In German &
English).
SUN: WAJDA'S KANAL

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

LOOK FOR THE
EM PAGE

By ADRIENNE LYONS
The timid, blonde woman smiled and
quietly said, "I needed to get into a
group, to get more involved. I found this
supportive. I found people who were
concerned."
She was referring to her participation
in Ann Arbor's Gay Lifestyles Con-
ference, which began yesterday.
Organizers are attempting to educate
members of the Ann Arbor gay com-
munity and others about the various
issues facing gays, using films,
workshops, and concerts.
ONE OF yesterday's workshops,
"Justice is Blind," focused on gays and
the legal system. Two of the facilitators
were American Civil Liberties Union
members Julie Carrell and Don
Coleman. The third facilitator was Ann
Arbor attorney Diana Autin.
The facilitators explained that gay
issues are something all courts are
divided on. "Everyone is guaranteed

equal protection under the law - ex-
cept gays," Autin declared. She
stressed that many regulations forbid
criminal, infamous, and immoral con-
duct, which is often how the activities of
gays are viewed.
Recently, courts have ruled that gays
can't be fired from government jobs on
the basis of being gay, as long as they
aren't "open" about their orientation.
The term "open" has not yet been
defined by the courts, Autin said. She
added that private employers are
legally exempted from hiring gays, if
there is a city ordinance protecting the
employers.
ON THE ISSUE of gays and religion,
a workshop entitled "A New Perspec-
tive on Religious and Ethical Issues"
was held, with Nancy Wilson, pastor of
the interdenominational Metropolitan
Community church in Detroit, and An-
drew Foster, minister at Canterbury
Loft, the Episcopalian Campus

Ministry facilitating.
"My assumption is that God loves
homosexuals - there is no basis for a
condemnation of homosexuals (in the
Bible)," Wilson said.
Foster added that only gays are op-
pressed because of sexual behavior.
"In Judeo-Christian religion," he said,
"there is a bias against body and
sexuality. Therefore, gays are
scapegoats." Wilson said churches
aren't sympathetic to gays, but
hypocritical. Wilson- added that the
Quakers were among the first religious
groups to deal with the gay issue and
that many Methodist church leaders
are "closet gays."
The gay teach-in will run through
Sunday. Saturday's and Sunday's
workshops will run from 10 a.m. until 5
p.m. Most workshops will be held at the
Michigan Union. See Today for details.

of
EVERY THURSDAY
for:
I mportant IM Dates
* IM Sports News
d IM Sports Results d DL
and morel do it DAILY

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(Continued from Page 1)
After the Regents held their morning
session, several members of the
Washtenaw County Coalition against
Apartheid (WCCAA) assembled in
front of the administration building to
protest University investments in South
Africa. However, the coalition mem-

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bers moved quickly to the Diag when
they realized the Board had no plans to
meet that afternoon.
The Regents switched their
discussion of the South African issue
from their Thursday meeting in Flint to
yesterday's main campus gathering at
Fleming's request.
Kate Rubin charged that the Regents
intentionally avoided a confrontation
with the group by excluding public
comment from the Ann Arbor meeting.
She admitted the Regents did follow
normal public comment procedure at
Flint, but said they should have bent the
rules to discuss the issue here.
EXAMINING A report by Arthur
Young and Co., the Regents expressed
their concern over the unauthorized ex-
penditure of almost $1 million by the
University Athletic Department on the
maintenance of Michigan Stadium in
1977-78.

The repairs were commissioned
without competitive bidding, violating
University policy. Also, the expen-
ditures were not included in last year's
annual reports.
Though Fleming didn't say exactly
what disciplinary measures, if any,
would be taken, he said Athletic Direc-
tor Don Canham would be informed
that the department's actions were itn-
proper.
THE REGENTS' agenda also in-
cluded the review of current issues.
University General Counsel Roderick
Daane prepared a brief analysis of the
recent U.S. Supreme Court Bakke
decision.
"It is reasonably clear that most
Universities around the country don't
believe they have to change the
procedures they have in effect,"
Fleming said in summarizing the
document. te

SHOW
TIMES
Sat-Sun-Wed
1:30
4:00
6:30
9:05
Mon-Tues-
Thurs-Fri
6:30
9:05

113 W. Liberty

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