100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 20, 1978 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


The Michigan Daily--Friday, October 20, 1978-Page 3
Lung cancer in
women increases

50% of f

paperbacks

I

j

r'~~
irtYOU SE W VS {kVM CALL DAJIa

Take ten
On October 20, 1968, Jacqueline Kennedy and Greek shipping
magnate Aristole Onassis were married in a Greek Orthodox
ceremony, possible jeopardizing theformer first lady's standing in the
Roman Catholic church because Onassis was divorced. Also that day,
Madalyn Murray, self-proclaimed "spokesman for the American
atheist community," attacked the wealth of churches and more
specifically their corporate dealings and tax-exempt status during a
speech at Hill auditorium. "Churches make a profit on everything,"
Murray claimed. In New York alone, she estimated "over eight billion
dollars worth of property is owned by churches."
appenings. ..
. .. Hola! Today starts with the American Association of University
Women's annual Used Book sale at 9 a.m. in the Union
Ballroom-.. . also at 9 starts today's Gay Lifestyles Workshop with
the "Justice is Blind" panel in the Union's Pendleton Room . . . noon
brings today's Gay Lifestyles Workshop film, "Gay USA," in the
Union lobby.. . also at noon at the Guil House is a luncheon, side show
and discussion of the 11th World Festival of Students and Youth which
was held in hanava, Cuba . . . the film "Weekend Athletes" will be
shown at Whitney Auditorium in the Student Education Building at
12:10 p.m..,. Mrs. Robert Griffin will speak on the role of women in
politics at Betsy Barbour at 1:45. . . Rep. Perry Bullard will take his
life into his hands to eat at Markley at 4:30, followed by a brief speech
and question session at the Concourse Lounge from 6:30-8. . . The
Huron Valley Group of the Sierra. Club will be showing several nature
films in the basement of the Ann Arbor Public Library at
7:30-subjects include America's national parks and the Great
Lakes . . . the Chamber Choir will perform at Hill auditorium at
8 ... also at 8 Dr. Jim Zogby will speak on "Camp David and the
Palestinians" in the Multi-purpose Room at the UGLI . . . Charles
Rqsen, pianist and music scholar, will give a concert in the Rackham
Lecture Hall at 8:30. . . and finally Charlie Murphy, gay folk singer,
will perform at 9 at Canterbury Loft . . . Adios!
Of pumpkins and peanuts
Linus has been vindicated: The Great Pumpkin is alive and well'and
victorious in Half Moon Bay, a coastal community south of San
Francisco. The monstrous melon, weighing in at 297.5 pounds, was
declared winner of the annual Half Moon Bay Pumpkin Festival that
began on Wednesday. The proud pumpkin-owner from Petaluma,
Calif., Frances Collings, beat his nearest competitor by
approximately 160 pounds of pumpkin pie. Those whose aesthetic taste
runs more towards appreciation of squash may find that this year's
348-pound winner the answer to their vegetable fantasies. Have no
fear, though, these vegetal aberrations are not attempting to take over
the world-just San Francisco.
On the outside. . .
look for slightly warmer weather with a high in the low 60s. Low
will be in the low 40s, with partly cloudy skies all day.

WASHINGTON (AP) .- Lung cancer,
by far the deadliest of the three most
common cancers, has increased
dramatically among women in this
decade, according to a major new
statistical report published yesterday.
The report, prepared by the National
Cancer Institute, indicates the
increased rate of lung cancer in the
United States and rising death rates
from the disease are largely
responsible for a growing number of
cancer cases and deaths generally.
THE ONGOING, 5-year-old study is
the first of its kind undertaken and is
expected to begin yielding more
comprehensive and reliable data about
variuos cancers and survival rates
from them in coming years.
The institute said the new figures,
when compared with the last major
cancer survey conducted for 1969-1971,
indicate that cancer cases generally
have been increasing 1 per cent to 2 per
cent a year since 1970, whereas the
lung. cancer rate among 'white women
has risen 8 per cent a year and among
black women nearly 10 per cent.
There have also been substantial
increases in the incidence of uterine or
endometrial cancer among women, but
in general that is not considered as
deadly a disease.
PREVIOUSLY noted declines in the
rate of cervical cancer in women and

stomach cancers among men and
women appear to be continuing, the
figures show.
While the statisticians say it is too
early to predict long-term survival
rates and trends 'based on the new
study, they have made some
provisional calculations to indicate the
how deadly the common forms of
cancer are.
Colon and rectal cancers, breast
cancer and lung cancer are by far the
most common lalignancies in humans,
occurring nearly twice as often as any
other form of the disease.
For those types, the report shows,
-.only 12 per cent of lung cancer victims
survive as long as three years, whereas
nearly four out of five women stricken
with breast cancer are still alive three
years later, and about half of those
diagnosed with cancer of the colon live
at least three years.
Earl Pollack, the statistician who
heads the Surveillance Epidemiology
and End Results program that
produced the new figures, said they
don't ekplain why some cancers are
increasing, while others are on the
decline.
The SEER study is based on data
collected from 11 areas around the
country, representing slightly more
than 10 per cent of the total U.S.
population.

S ID
BOO
SHO

E
K
P

WEST

/
.nto
LI

113 w Liberty
used, rare, &out-of- print

books (313)
thur.& fri. eves

995-

4891

til 9

hr-s: mon.- sat.

11-6

THERE ARE PEOPL E
OUT THERE
THEY LIVE IN PLACES LIKE CHAD, MALI, TOGO,
BELIZE,BENIN.. ,GABON, RWANDA AND FIJI. IN
AFRICAASIALATIN AMERICA. THEY LIVE IN
AMERICA,TOO. IN CROWDED CITIES,FORGOTTEN
HILLS. THEIR DREAMS ARE COMMON, NEEDS BASIC:
FOOD AND WATER,HEALTH AND HOUSING, JOBS,...
AND YOU, .,TO HELP AS A PEACE CORPS OR VISTA
VOLUNTEER.
Sign-up at Placement Office
3rd Floor Student Activities Building
Representatives available for interviews
October 25, 26 & 27
p$VISTA

r

by Wayne Cable

Stephanie Smith

_

Eckankar
seminar
d ยข et oi n.
begins in
De troit
By MARK SANFORD
How do you put into words love,
freedom, and inner joy?
For Amy Bodian, Ann Arbor
representative of Eckankar, this is
largely a rhetorical question. While she
may have problems expressing these
broad concepts, she has no trouble
relating how she happened to acquire
them. For her and other followers, the
'answer lies in Eckankar, the Path of
Total Awareness.
ECKANKAR is a spiritual-
educational path of awareness which
teaches that an individual is more than
a physical entity. It teaches that Man is
a soul capable of reaching beyond the
physical limitations of time, space, and
energy - while experiencing a state of
religious awareness through the
teachings of soul travel or out of body
experience.
"I came to a point in my life where I
has a particular inner experience;
where I recognized that Eckanker
could give me the personal freedom and
liYnitless awareness of other parts of
myself and the universe that I
intuitively knew I could have," said
Bodian.
A seminar entitled "The World of
Eck" begins today and continues
through ,Sunday at Cobo Arena in

-4

okcc*. c ,
v V bN54)

CIA
S# " 6A5S - WS- FiMtol, W'13- 5N)- bASS-. ASS. N SS,

CV
c/7
~r)
cc.
s
"f
"
I

5
f

THE NEW
BASS SUGARLOAFER.
Treat yourself to a pair of
the greatest new Bass
shoes ever. Sugarloafers.
,Light. Plush. And un-
believably comfy.
With famous Bass
\r craftsmanship inside
and out. Sugarloafers.
{ We've got em!
Shoemakers to America for a hundred years
'N _**wy " w~ i

C's
C4
CA
a
CA
r-i
Con
f
44

HAVE A

WE

'U

of

M

NEIRF

FOR

YOU

(with a minimum purchase)

1

1I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan