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October 19, 1978 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-19

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One dollar won't even buy
you a cheap bottle of wine, !
a single rose, or a small
box of candy.
But now 1 will buy a message
straight from the heart PQII
rinted in the MICHIGAN DAILY
SWEETEST DAY SPECIAL,
Saturday, October 21.
Fill out the form and mail it to:
SWEETEST DAY AD
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI, 48109
Or come in personally to the Daily, located next to the Student
Activities Building and behind Betsy Barbour Hall (we're on the sec-
ond floor) by 3 p.m. Thursday, October 19. Make checks payable to
the Michigan Daily. The cost is $1 for 2 lines (14 words). Each addi-
tional line is 504.
LAT D AY!
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Page 6-Thursdaiy, October 19, 1978--The Michigan Daily

Camp David success threatens
Republican Nov. election hopes

WASHINGTON (UPI)-Republican
dreams of a November election
comeback are threatened by President
Carter's Camp David triumph and the
power of incumbency by Democrats
who now hold two out of three seats in
Congress and three out of four
governorships.
The GOP's best hope now is that a
tax-weary electorate will continue the
revolt triggered by Proposition 13 and
upset incumbent Democrats who do not
now appear in serious trouble. This
trend appeared only moderately in this
year's 40 state primaries-with
Democratic Gov. Michael Dukakis of
Massachusetts the main victim.
THE BEST predictions now give
Republicans no gain, or even a loss in
the Senate, slight gains in the House
and a fairly good chance of picking up
some governorships.
It is in the races for governor that the
GOP has its best shot. They now hold
only a dozen of the 50 governorships,
and are favored to pick up between
three to eight by conservative guesses,
and as many as a dozen if all falls their
'way.
There are 36 governorships on the
ballot. Of the nine now held by
Republicans, Democrats will reclaim
the open seat in South Carolina and are
threatening to topple the venerable
James Rhodes of Ohio. Otherwise GOP
seats appear safe-with upsets possible
for Republican Govs. Robert Bennett of
Kansas, Jay Hammond of Alaska and
Meldrim Thomson of New Hampshire.
In Michigan, recent polls have shown
Governor William Milliken leading his
Democratic challenger William
Fitzgerald by . only 4 points.
ONCE THE GOP had high hopes of
adding both California and New York to
their state house list. But their lead in
California has disappeared as Gov.
Edmund Brown plays his unique game
of campaign magic and in New York
Gov. Hugh Carey is closing in on
Assembly Minority Leader Perry
Duryea.
With chances at capturing the big
plums fading, Republicans are zeroing
in on smaller states. While they have a
shot against Gov. Ella Grasso in Con-
necticut and the open seats in Massa-
chusetts, Florida and Pennsylvania,
their better chances are in Idaho,
Nebraska, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon,
South Dakota, and Wyoming.
Wyoming.
Republicans, will call it a victory if
they break even in the Senate on
election day. Thernumbers give them
trouble--there are 35 seats up, 17
Republicans and 18 Democrats.

TO HOLD their own in the Senate,
Republicans will have to defeat some
incumbent Democrats, and they have
picked two young congressmen to do
it-Rep. William Cohen leads Sen.
William Hathaway in Maine and Rep.
William Armstrong is in a tight battle
with Sen. Floyd Haskell in Colorado,
New Right Republicans are now
underdogs in two races. Jeffrey Bell,
who upset Sen. Clifford Case in the
primary is behind basketball great Bill
Bradley in New Jersey and in Iowa
Democratic Sen. Dick Clark seems to
be winning his fight with Roger Jepsen.
All 435 House seats are on the ballot

this year, with bpth partie
concentrating on the 02 open an
marginal seats: Margital seats ar
those in which the victorwon with les.
than 55 percent of the vte two year
ago.
The Republicans are aiming at 34
marginal Democratic seas and 37 oper
Democratic seats.
Both parties say the GOP will havt
mdest gains of around a lozen House
seats this year-less a than th(
percentage gains normallymade by th
party out of power in i mid-terr
election.

sU' engine dept.aids
space shuttle program

By TIMOTHY YAGLE
and JULIE BROWN
Faculty and students are looking
towards the stars as several University
departments get involved in the
National Aeronautics and Space Ad-
ministration's (NASA) space shuttle
program.
The Areospace Engineering depar-
tment will offer a space systems design
class starting winter term. According
to Professor Harm Buning, 20 students
will assist in the design of a payload to
be used in a 1982 shuttle program.
Buning said he is a little concerned
that students might not become in-
terested in the project because many of
them will have graduated before the
1982 launching date.
PRESENTLY, AEROSPACE
Professor William Powers is designing
the shuttle's re-entry guidance system,
a crucial aspect of the mission.
NASA has opened the sale of cargo bay
space to the private sector making it
possible for the University to become
involved in the program.
The University bought five cubic feet
of space in the shuttle's cargo bay for
$10,000. The cost of the cargo space is
proportional to volume.
THE DEPARTMENT has yet to
decide what it will place in the space.
NASA must establish a criterion for
determining what kind of experiments
are installed in the 60 by 15 foot cargo
area. "They must be self-contained,
safety wise experiments, in good
taste," said Buning.
TheUniversity Space Physics
Research Lab currently has payloads

on various spacecrafts in obit righ
now.
"WE HAVE the expertise cf puttin
payloads into space," said Aerospac
Department Chairman Robe't How
"We have a leg up on othe univer
sities."
One of the 45 experiments eurrentl5
being prepatedds a mass spectrometei
to be launches in 1981.
The experiment package, designec
and built by Dr. Marcia Torr of th
Space PhysicsLab, will fly on Spacelal
I
"IT CONTAINS an array of five spec
trometers, eachone covering a portio
of the spectrumfrom the ultra-violett
the infrared," stid Torr. "It will b
used for studies yf constituents of th
upper atmosphere and their emission.
into space," she sad.
Torr said that she sent her ex
perimental proposd, which was amon
two to three hundrd others asking fo
payload space, to NkSA when the agen
cy first announced jayload openings ii
the spring of 1976.
"THE SPACE SHITTLE program is
underfunded compared to Apollo,"
Howe said. He citel public apathy
along with congressiial awareness ;
the public's indiffeences, as beh
primarily responsibk for the lack <
funds.
NASA must compte With a number
of federal program for funding, said
Howe. And the fat that the space
program is unable o furnish the "im-
mediate pay-off" flat the public ex-
pects has had a diect effect on fund
allocation.

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