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October 17, 1978 - Image 5

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-17

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New pope,
rates here,
(Continued from Page 1)
and again for five days in 1976. He also
visited then-Cardinal Wojtyla in 1976 in
Krakow,.
"I know the new pope as a fantastic
man who fulfills all the requirements of
being the leader of the Catholic world,
said Ziemba.
"He is a humanist, very pastoral, a
realist, a tremendous theologian. And
quite importantly, I might add he is
very healthy and vital. While he was
here at St. Mary's, he insisted on
having some time off so he could exer-
cise and we all. came to respect his
abilities as an athlete.''
WHEN ZIEMBA was in Poland in
1977 be wanted to celebrate a memorial
mass for his mother who had died in
1976.
"It was Mother's Day - the first
Mother's Day I was without my mother
and even though it was very late,
about midnight as 1 recall, I told Car-
dinal Wojtyla that I wanted to celebrate
a mass.
"The Cardinal smiled and said, 'Fine,
I will tell the nun to prepare for a
solemn mass.' When I walked into the
chapel," said Ziemba,. "I couldn't
believe my eyes. Cardinal Wojtyla was
in the first pew. After the long,
exhausting day we spent together, and
even though he should have been in bed,
he was such a giving man that he
stayed avake and celebrated the mass
with me.'
FATHER NILUS Hubbleton of the St.
Mary's Student Chapel identified the
new pope as "conservative in theology,
but a social progressive. When the an-
nouncement was made, the students we
have living upstairs here at St. Mary's
, ran down to watch the scene in Rome.
They were yelling and jumping up and
down right along with the Italians on
the television."
Several University professors who
have lived in Poland at various times
were overjoyed by the news. History
professor Andrew Ehrenkreutz, who
left Poland in 1939 at the outbreak of
World War II, met the new pope when
Cardinal Wojtyla visited Michigan in
1976.
"He gave me a very strong im-
pression as a brilliant man," said
Ehrenkreutz. "He had a lively per-
sonality and a brilliant mind that could
focus and define a wide variety of
worldly political and religious issues.
The conclusions he drew from the
arguments were stated in very
precisely formulated sentences.
"THE NEW POPE has- been-known
as an outspoken champion of human
rights in Poland. On the basis of his per-
formance as archbishop and cardinal, I
think we will now see a better ar-
a ticulated approach to the relationship
between the Catholic Church and the
Communist dominated nations."
Ehrenkreutz related an incident that
took place in Poland in the early 1970's
when John Paul II was still the arch-
bishop of Krakow. Some of his
parishioners approached the arch-
bishop about some problems they were
having with the local Communist Party
leaderships
In Poland, each church is built and
virtually each priest is ordained only
after negdtiations with the Communist
Party.
"I CAN'T remember what the par-
ticular problem was that time," said
Ehrenkreutz, "But the new pope simply
got on the telephone and called the par-
ty leadership and through a very frank

exchange of negotiations he obtained
what his faithful parishioners needed."
Another history professor, Roman
Szporluk, who, although not a native of
Poland, lived there until 1958, said he
had predicted in private conversation
with his friends that Karol Cardinal
Wojtyla would be elected pope.
"From what I have read and heard
and what I saw in Poland the new pope
is a very remarkable man," said Sz-
porluk. "He is a church leader who is
very well aware of current political
problems in the world. In Poland, he,
had organized a synod so that now, or-
dinary citizens in Poland have input in
a much needed way into the affairs of
the church there. Today's church is in
need of advice from the people."

Senate campaign gifts flow in

(Continued from Page )
received, leaving the campaign with a
net debt of $113,129 at the start of Oc-
tober.
Levin is not in the same financial
class, having raised about half of Grif-
fin's million, or $1458,728. The
Democrat raised and spent $176,354 in
September. Levin was left with an out-
standing primary debt of more than
$28,000 this month, down from $37,000 in
August.
Levin made a loan to his own cam-
paign of $15,000 in July which is still
listed in the files as a debt. In August
the AFL-CIO's Committee on Political
Education added $5,000 to Levin's fun-
ds. Both Detroit and Washington
Democratic groups have more than
compensated for the Ford campaign
donation to Griffin's group.
BOTH SENATE candidates list plen-
ty of $1,000 gifts, though Griffin had a
surprising number of small donors, one
for a sincle cent.
In the congressional race, Bob
Weber, administrative assistant for
Congressman Pursell, described the
weakening effect of the delayed

congressional race:
"WHEN GREENE wasn't on the
ballot we had a lot of difficulties raising
money. People didn't see the point of
giving money to Pursell when he didn't
even have an opponent. This directly
affected our overall fund-raising ac-
tivities."
The total cash on hand in the Pursell
campaign chest as of Sept. 30 was
$35,742. According to Weber, that figure
has been reduced in the past few weeks
to approximately $30.000.
"WE ARE WAY behind schedule
based on what we raised two years
ago," said Weber. "We raised $98,000
against Ed Pierce in that campaign -
we aren't going to come near that this
time. But our competition isn't as
strong (financially) this time either, so
it evens out."
With the two loans - $3,000 froin Ann
Arbor Bank and Trust and $5,000 from
Gerald Faye, a personal friend of
Greene's - representing the bluk of
Greene's finances, Weber's statement
seems accurate. A third loan of $3,000
has been pledged by Thano Masters,
owner of the Lamplighter restaurant.

"This may be one of the cheapest'
congressional campaigns on record,"
said Steve Pinney, of the Greene cam-
paign.
THE TOTAL amount in the Greene
till as of Sept. 30 was $9,531. According
to Pinney the current figure is
somewhat higher - "probably a little
less" than $11,000. Pinney described
Greene's campaign as a "hand-to-
mouth existence."
The majority of the 91 contributions
were under $25.
In contrast with the small town local
flavor of Greene's contributors, Pursell
is bringing in most of his major finan-
ces from oil companies and labor
groups.
The Metropolitan Detroit AFL-CIO
Council and the political arm of the
United Auto Workers each contributed
to Pursell's reelection effort, along with
the political action branch of the state's
AFL-CIO, which donated $50.
The two major oil company con-
tributions were Amoco Political Action
Committee and the Conoco Employee's
Good Government Fund, contributing
$500 and $200 respectively.

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 17, 1978-Page
Brandeis University,,
JACOB HIATT
INSTITUTE IN -ISRAEL.
What does it offer you?
" a semester of study in Israel in the Fall term
" coursework in English on the political, economic and
social development of Israel and in its language,
history and archaeology
" a strong program of Hebrew language study
" important internship opportunities in social service
agencies in Jerusalem
" field trips, study trips, interviews with prominent
. Israelis, a kibbutz visit
" fiancial aid is available
Application deadline: March 15
For further information, see your Study
Abroad advisor or write:
Office of International Programs
Brandeis University
Waltham, Massachusetts 02154
--- (617) 647-2422

i TS 1 i
, , :.
k

Brandeis University admits students of any race, color, national
or ethnic origin, sex, age or handicap to all its programs and
activities.

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