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October 17, 1978 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-17

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 17, 1978-Page 3

IFYUSEE t'&OIS E VPPO4CALL WDAJtY

REGENT CALLS FOR END TO HEARING:

Graduate union may win case

Take ten
On October 17, 1968, Attorney General Frank Kelley said he would
seek a "top to-bottom revision of undemocratic laws" which prohibit
write-in voting and place other restrictions on the Michigan
electorate. Kelley said an example of such "absurd, unfair and
undemocratic" laws was his recent ruling that write-in votes for then-
Sen.Eugene McCarthy could be counted. "As attorney general, I'm
required to 'tell it like it is,' " he explained, "not as I might wish it to
be"
Happenings...
. . . begin today with a preview of the Comic Opera Guild's "The
Beggar's Opera" at noon in the Pendleton Room of the Union.... then
from 1 p.m. until 3:30 p.m. area senior citizens and other interested
persons are invited to-the Turner Geriatic Clinic Workshop. Today's
topicis entitled "Adapting to Visual Problems," and experts from the
University Hospital and other public health agencies will lecture and
hold discussions. . . at 3:30 p.m., the Music School's "18th Annual
Conference on Organ Music," will present a performance by
Universidoctoral students in Hill Auditorium ... also at 3:30 p.m.,
the William W. Cook Lectures on American Institutions resume with a
talk by Garry Wills on "The Hero as Caesar." The speech will he held
in Room 120 of Hutchins Hall ... at. 4:00 p.m., the. Women's Support
Group will meet in the Green Room of the Wesley Foundation. . . and
at 4:15 p.m., the Office of Ethics and Religion presents "Rome, Leeds
and the' Desert-Catholicism" in Aud. 3, MLB. . . kick off the
evening at 7:15 p.m. with the. Wesley Foundation Volleyball Game.
The game will take place on Court 4 in the IM building.., back to the
Wesley Foundation's Green Room at 7:30 p.m. for a meeting of the
Women's Support Group No. 2 . . . also at 7:30 p.m., the
Undergraduate Political Science Associationwill hold their monthly
meeting in Room 2003, Angell Hall . . . and if those two events don't
interest you, perhaps you'll want to catch the International Center's
symposium on "Middle East-Peace or War?" with lectures by Prof.
A. Mendel and Prof. R. Tanter. It takes place at 7:30 p.m. in the
.: Rackham.Amphitheater . .. at 8:00 p.m. The Ann Arbor Society of the
- American Institute of Archeology will present Dr. Eva Keuls, Prof. of
: < Classics 5t the University of Minnesota, in a lecture on "The Brink of
~ 2Death in Classical Greek Painting.".That occurs in Room 203, Tappan
' Hall.. . and finally, you can wrai up the day with an organ concert by
y Almut Rossler, director of nusi in Johanneskirche, Dusseldorf,
Germany. It starts at 8:30at Hill Auditorium.
Gunea pig cuisine?
Although guinea pigs have long been considered standard fare in pet
shops and in laboratories,'most Americans would not be accustomed
to seeing these animals on a dinner plate. But guinea pigs, (or cuy),
'have long been an important food source in certain Latin American
:7-countries for 25 centuries, and recently, Peru has begun an
experimental exportation program which features this furry little
: animal. Threason for the increased interest in the guines pig is due,
in part;. precent studies which report that "guy , meat" is
conssiderably richer in protein than chicken or beef. These
advantages have brought about a great influx of guinea pig recipes,
including the delightful entry: "cuyes a la criolla", (creole style
guines pigs), which is prepared with lots of garlic and hot peppers.'
Who knows? Dorms may be serving guinea pig delicacies before too
long.
0
"Not the New York Times"
New Yorkers had to look twice yesterday when they went to buy
their interim morning newspapers. There it was, looking just like The
New York Times read by many until the newspaper strike- took it off
the stands nearly 10 weeks ago - but this one was called "Not the New
YFk Times." The parody newspaper imitates the Times style, feature
items and superstar writers for 24 pages of put-ons, nasty quips, and
take-offs. Or, as its mocking front-page motto says: "All the news Not
r Fit to Print." Hopefully, Ann Arbor readers will never wake up to find
an issue of "Not the Michigan Daily" on the newsstands.
y0
On the outside . .
We may beseeing Mr. Sun today, but he isn't going to warm things
up very much. The forecast calls for partly sunny skies and cooler air,
with a high of only 570,

By MITCH CANTOR
After two years of on-and-off
Michigan Employment Relations
Commission (MERC) hearings, the
great debate about whether Graduate
Student Assistants (GSAs) are students
or employees may finally come to an
end out of court.
In a recent r interview, University
Regent James Waters (D-Muskegon)
said he is considering presenting to the
rest of the board, possibly as early as
November, a resolution calling for the
University to drop its case and end the
MERC hearing.
BY DROPPING the case, the Univer-
sity would concede that GSAs are in-
deed employees, and the Graduate
Employee's Organization (GEO) would
earn the right to bargain with the
University for the GSAs.
"If it (the trial) looks like it's going to
go into the next year, I would propose to
have it dropped," Waters said earlier
this month.
Hearing dates have already been set
for November and December. GEO is
slated to finish presenting its witnesses,
which may be followed by rebuttal wit-
nesses from the University.
GEO attorney Mark Cousens said he
does not expect a MERC decision until
at least July 1, 1979. -He added,
however, that the possibility of
testimony extending past the.new year
is "very unlikely."
UNIVERSITY lawyers were
unavailable for comment.
GEO accused the University of an un-
fair labor practice in November 1976.
After losing the ensuing court case in
August 1977, the University appealed on
the grounds that GSAs are not em-
ployees, but rather students who are
granted assistantships as a form of
financial aid.
Administrative Law Judge Shlomo
Sperka - has been presidin* over the
case, which recommenced last May

"I really don't think any action is ap-
propriate until the case is complete,"
Baker said, representing the opposite
opinion.
The sentiment among the four Regen-
ts who would not commit themselves
either way was that they would have to
see the resolution in its final form
before even considering it.
SHOULD THE Regents allow for the
completion of the MERC hearings,
there is the possibility of a University

appeal if MERC rules in favor of GEO.
In the last two weeks, four Regents
have committed themselves against
appealing a pro-GEO decision. Brown,
Dunn, Power, and Waters have com-
mitted themselves against an appeal.
The other four Regents have refused to
say publicly how they would vote on the
question of an appeal.
"I would wait until an ultimate
decision by MERC to make a decision,"
Nederlander said.

. . rimu e

Waters

and dragged on through the summer
and the fall.
IF WATERS introduces a resolution
calling for the University to drop the
case, the Regents could end the two-
year battle with a simple majority vote.
Waters, who along with Gerald Dunn
(D-Lansing) originally voted against
appealing the case, said whether or not
he brings up the resolution depends on
how much support he thinks it would
get:
An informal poll of the Regents found
Waters and Dunn supporting such a
motion. Deane Baker (R-Ann Arbor)
and Robert Nederlander (D-
Birmingham) said they would oppose
the measure. Paul Brown (D-
Petoskey), David Laro. (R-Flint),
Sarah Power (D-Ann Arbor), and
Thomas Roach (D-Detroit), would not
commit themselves either way.I
"I WOULDN'T have any opposition to
bargaining with them if they lost,"
Waters said. Waters and Dunn both
voted against appealing the original
decision.

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents at Aud A
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17
the spirit of the beehive
(Victor Erico, 1973) 7&A 10:15-AUD. A
Spain, 1940. A little girl, exquisitely played by ANA TORRENT, watches a travel-
ing show of FRANKENSTEIN and is traumatized by it. Day after day Ana goes out
alone, crossing the barren countryside in searcisof the Frankenstein monster.
"A study of a hungry, imaginative, lonely child lost in the maze of an embittered
land, this film is not only a major work, but the best film to have come out of
Spain."-FILMSIN REVIEW. In the sensitivity-towards-children genre to which it
belongs, it is easily a better addition than either SMALL CHANGE or CRIA. ANN
ARBOR PREMIERE.
THESE ARE THE DAMNED
(Joseph Losely, 1963) 8:40 only-AUD A
A scientist breeds a group of emotionless, "ice-cold" children who are condi-
tioned to survive atomic warfare. While fleeing from a motorcycle gang, an
American (MacDonald Carey) comes upon these strange children. "Unusual,
chillingly effective. From the opening scenes, when a casual tourist picks up a
girl in a seacoast village, only to be brutally beaten by a gang of motorcycling
Teddy boys, the atmosphere is surrealistic."-N.Y. TIMES. With OLIVER REED.
ANN ARBOR PREMIERE.
Tomorrow & Thursda : LAST TANGO IN PARIS

ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJORS
DON'T MISS TALKING
TO THE HUGHES
RECRUITER VISITING
YOUR CAMPUS SOON.
Contact your placement office
for interview dates.
HUGHES
L----------------------j
Creating a new world with electronics
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F

I I

MANN THEATRES Wed. Matinees
xVO LLAGET All seats $1.50
MAPLE VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER, Alse s$ .5
769.1300 wU until 4:30
Fr sSHOW
" dh etEprss"TIMES
Sat-Sun-Wed
1:30
' 4:00
6:30
9:05
Mon-Tues-
Thurs-Fri
6:30
9:05
PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS SHOW
TIMES
4 Sat-Sun-Wed
1 00 6:15
2:45 8:00
4:30 9:45
Mon-Tues-
Thurs-Fri
8:00
9:45
LATE SHOWS
Fri-Sat
11:30

I

THIS WEEK

Daily Official Bulletin
TUESDA Y OCTOBER 17, 1978
oiyCalendar:
Computer & Communications Sci: Ann Schlitt,
firmative Action Office, "Affirmative Action
'Mate," 3050 Frieze, noon.
Music School: 18th Annual Conference on Organ
"usic, recital, Hill Aud, 3:30 p.m.
-Statistics: Robb J. Muirhead, "Some SAsymptotic
psutts on MANOVA," Wells HallIl, Michigan State
4p.m.
Physics & Astronomy: M. Dienfat, University of
,x-MarseilIe, "Neutron Scattering Studies of
-Dimensional Phase Transitions;" 2038 Randall, 4
-Music School: Almut Rossler, Organ Recital, Hill
.,8:30 p.m.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LIX, No.35
Tuesday, October 17, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan' 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street.
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail,
outside Ann, Arbor.
Summer session published through Saturday
morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
.$7,00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

I

Mlad Hatter's~ Tea Party Michigan 'Student Assembly RN chi, . '
,mnPRESENT

JOHNATHON KOZOL: education critic and author
will lecture on the "Myth of Impotence: Student Power and
Student Action."
Wed., Oct. 18, 8 p.m., Rackham
Auditorium. Tickets $1. Presented
by Viewpoint Lectures.
INTERNATIONAL WEEK: International films, lecture
series, soccer festival, cultural exhibition.
Lecture series Oct. 17-19, 7:30 p.m.,
Rackham Aud. See program for other
events. UAC-SPECIAL EVENTS.
GAY LIFESTYLES CONFERENCE: Series of work-
shops, concerts and films designed to encourage dialogue or
the experience of gays in all aspects of society.
October 20-22, all day. Michigan Union.
UAC-SPECIAL EVENTS.
COFFEE HOUSE: Student talent performing in an in-
formal atmosphere.
Oct. 24, 8 p.m., University Club.
FREE. UNION PROGRAMMING.
JAM $ESSION: Monday nights.
University Club, 9:30-12:30 a.m.
ECLIPSE JAZZ.

.

4,

UTMm'"REGE

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