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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 15, 1978 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

9'
nke
NEW YORK (AP)-Lou Piniella
drilled a dramatic two-out single in the
1f inning, scoring Roy White with the
winning run as the New York Yankees
b4Dnced from behind for a 4-3 victory
ur Los Angeles in yesterday's rain
ild$yed fourth game of the 1978 World

/

PINIELLA 'S RBI SINGLE WINS IT
es drop LA in tenth,4-3

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, October 15, 1978-Page 11
LOS ANGELES NEW YORK

ab r h

bi

ab r h bi

Lopes 2b...........
Russell ss.............
Smith rf ............
Garvey lb..........
Cey A3..............
Baker If .. ......
Monday dh..........
North cf ............
Yeager c..............
Davalillo ph ...........
Grote c.................

4
5
4
4
4
4
2
4
3
0

1 o 0
o 2 0
0 0 0
o i p;
0 0 0
o i o
o 0 0
1 1 a
o 0 0
0 0 0
3 6 3

Blair cf .............
Rivers ph .... ......
White If ............ .
Munson c.... ........
Jackson dh.........
Piniella rf..........
Nettles 3b..........
Chambliss lb .........
Stanley 2b..........
Spencer ph........
Doyle2b...........
lDent ss .............
Total........,.........

Los Angeles starter Tommy John was
nursing a 3-2 lead built on Reggie
Smith's three-run homer in the fifth
when Paul Blair opened the Yankees'
eighth with a single.
Terry Forster relieved John, and
White sacrificed the runner to second.
That brought up Munson, captain of the
Yankees. Forster got ahead on the
count at 0-2, one of the strikes a foul ball
that smashed off Munson's leg so hard
that it rolled all the way to shortstop.
On the next pitch, Munson doubled in-
side third base for the tying run.
AFTER JACKSON was hit by a pitch,
the 21-year-old Welch-who had saved
the Dodgers' second-game vic-
tory-relieved again. He retired
Piniella on a pop fly, then struck out
Graig Nettles, ending the rally.
Then the game settled down to a duel
of relievers with Welch of the Dodgers
and Gossage of the Yankees matching
fastballs as the contest spun into extra
innings.
The Yankees got back in the game
with two runs in the sixth against John,
helped along by a bizarre play in-
volving Dodgers shortstop Bill Russell.
WITH ONE OUT, White singled to
center and Munson walked on a 3-2 pit-
ch. Jackson followed with a single to
right, scoring White with the first New
York run. The hit extended Jackson's
streak of driving in at least one run to
eight consecutive World Series games,
tying the all-time record held y Lou
Gehrig.
Then, with the score 3-1 and runners
at first and second, Piniella lined a shot
near second base. Russell gloved the
ball for a moment and it seemed like a
sure double play with Munson trapped
off second.
BUT RUSSELL dropped the ball. ie
recovered in time to step on second,
forcing Jackson, and it seemed he still
might complete the double play with a
throw to first.

4
a
3
3I

But the throw was low and struck
Jackson-who had only gone a few feet
off first base-in the right thigh. It
bounced away, into foul territory,
allowing Munson to score.
The Dodgers argued that Jackson
had interfered with the throw, but the

2
0
fl.
0
{1
0
0
0
0
4
M 0
0

Total................. 35

Los Angeles.................................................. 000
New York .....................................................0)14

002

000
WlO

Los Angeles IP
John ...................................................... 7
Forster. ........ ........................................
W elch L, 0-1 ....... ... .................................. 2i
New York
Figueroa ...................................................5
Tidrow . .. ........................................... 3
Gossage W, 1.0 .................. ..........2

11 It
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ALL YOU CANUAY
EVERY SUNDAY

ITALIAN BUFFET .

$3.95

0 .0."..

EVERY MONDAY
SPAGHETTI .......... $2.50
INCLUDES: Huge Salad Bar with over 30 items
2 Home Made Soups

umpires did not allow the protest. It
was ruled a fielder's choice with an
error on Russell.
Until the fifth, John and New York
starter Ed Figueroa were locked in a
scoreless game..

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DOWNTOWN

11 4E.
Washington

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MHTPF
PR ESEN T

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# ..; [AP Photo
LOU PINIELLA, second from right, is congratulated by Catfish Hunter after the
Yankee rightfielder singled home Roy White in the tenth inning to give New York
4-3 victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers in the fourth game of the World Series
last night. Also pictured are Yankee coach Gene Michaels and designated hitter
Reggie Jackson. The victory by New York evened up this year's series at two
games apiece.
TEAM WINS FIFT H, 5-3
Clubbers clip EMU.
By BOB EMORY
Special to The Daily
YPSILANTI - The Michigan women's field hockey team snapped a 3-3
tie with a pair of goals in the waning minutes of the game as they came on to
upend a feisty Eastern Michigan squad 5-3 yesterday at Eastern's Bowen
Field.
It was the third victory in a row for the Wolverines, who just last
-Thursday bumped off defending state champion Central Michigan by a 2-1
inargin in a game played up in Mt. Pleasant. It was the first time Michigan
bas ever beaten Central in its six-year varsity history.
Yesterday's game, played in the brisk morning air, was not a classic
;display of field hockey as both teams were sluggish at the start, often
overruning the ball and missing on several good opportunities to score.
"I think we might have had a small letdown after beating Central," said
head coach Phyllis Ocker. "When Eastern scored the tying goal, I thought
:we might really come down, but they hung in there and I was very pleased
.,about that."
The Hurons trailed two different times before Sandy Darrow tied the
score at 3-3 with a goal midway through the second half. But four minutes
::later Alexandra Callam fired a long pass down field and Dea Mazzetta snuck
.hrough the Huron defense as she notched the winning goal, her third score
fthe year.
That goal seemed to deflate Eastern's momentum, as halfback Mary
;'Hibbard was able to deflect a weak shot past EMU netminder Sue Plecha
;only one minute later.
Jean McCarthy, Alexandra Callam and her sister Mary scored the other
goals for the Wolverines, who are off to their best start ever with a 5-2 record
on the year.

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Actionr
..::".. O n . E n erg y
"... The Greatest Challenge
For America's Future . . ."
AN INTENSIVE EFFORT TO DEVELOP ALTERNATIVE ENERGY SOURCES
IS CRUCIAL TO OUR ECONOMY... OUR SECURITY.. .
OUR ENTIRE FUTURE.
Congressman Pursell is a leader in developing the new energy sources needed to meet this challenge. As a
member of the House Science and Technology Committee, Carl was instrumental in securing the first
committee approval for directly funding civilian laser fusion energy research.
In both of his first two years in Congress, Carl successfully sponsored amendments to intensify fusion
energy research, bringing our country closer to a vast new form of energy, and particularly aiding
important research at KMS Fusion of Ann Arbor and the University of Michigan.
A new Pursell bill proposes a comprehensive, long-range plan for rapidly developing new energy
resources, including fusion, solar, geothermal, biomass and innovative uses of
conventional fuels.
k
PURSELL
HIS LEADERSHIP AND ABILITY ARE MAKING A REAL
DIFFERENCE IN SHAPING OUR NATION'S
ENERGY POLICY

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