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October 12, 1978 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 12-Thursday, October 12, 1978--The Michigan Daily

Purs eli
(Continued from Page 1)
districts the rest of the time," he said.
Pursell's accessibility has provoked
widespread criticism from many of the
district's Democratic leaders who
maintain the representative has a poor
attendance record.
BUT PURSELL defends his atten-
dance record, arguing he only misses
sessions in which his vote is

predicts substantial re-election victory

meaningless.
"There are many votes on the floor
where although you may have an
opinion about the issue, it is not essen-
tial that you have to be there to vote,"
said Pursell.
Several months ago, local Democrats
were severely criticizing Pursell for
failing to come out in support of exten-

ding the ratification deadline for
passage of the ERA bill. Some even
said he opposed the bill. PUrsell,
however, denies the charge, and claims
he was only waiting for the proper time
so that passage of the extension of the
deadline could be assured.
"I WAS WORRIED that premature
support of the extension would hurt its

chances to pass," he said.
He contends he was one of the prime
sponsors in 1973, while he was in the
state legislature, to get the legislation
passed in Michigan.
Concerning the abortion controversy,
Pursell indicated he opposes abortions
except in cases of rape, incest and if
there is a danger to the life of the

mother.
"IT SEEMED LIKE there were more
abortions than marriages last year,"'he
said.
The 46-year-old congressman has
continually called for fiscal restraint
during his tenure in the nation's capital.
He considers the inflation issue to be
much more seri-
ous than unemployment, and that is
why he voted against increasing the
nation's minimum wage last year and
even supports cutting that rate by 15
per cent.
"The most important thing is to
create jobs and all the minimum wage
does is to increase inflation. Inflation
will eventually increase unemployment
and will hurt the people it is supposed to
help," he argues.
SWITCHING TO THE foreign policy

arena, the congressman said he
believes the Carter administration
should maintain a strong defense
posture
Regarding the controversial issue of
whether American corporations should
divest its holdings from South Africa,
the congressman indicated that the
issue should be reviewed more exten-
sively before a final decision is made.
But he said that a U.S. pullout would
severely damage the economy and take
jobs away from both blacks and whites.
Pursell was elected to the state
senate in 1970 and served until 1976.
Before that, he was a member of the
Wayne County Board of Commissioners
and a private businessman.

( EVERYTHING YOU N
\ B

EVER EXPECTED FROM AN APPLIANCE STORE.
i4

Parkers beware:
Spotter search is on

g "Out The
ur System,

(Continued from Page 1)
Murray said, "We aren't out for boun-
ty." He added, "We want to enforce the
law, but we're not out to hassle people
too much."
Walter Brooks, one of the roving tag
spotters, said of his job, "It's great." He
added that he enjoys working outdoors
and finds about nine offenders daily.
Although Brooks checks University lots
for vehicles on his list, he does not
check if other cars are legally parked
there.
Brooks has no supervisor on his job,
so he can choose his own time for lunch
and breaks. He agreed that it would be
easy to goof off on this job, "But I'd
rather go out and do the work."
MURRAY SAID THE program
should continue until the end of Oc-
tober. By that time, he said, the "initial
crunch" will end and new students
should get the city's point and start
parking legally.
Another reason the program will be
terminated is that new license plates
will soon be issued, making the com-
puterized lists obsolete.
Murray said if the fine hikes, towing

and the boot work as they are intended
the revenue made from the parking
fines will diminish because fewer
people will park illegally.
MAYOR LOUIS BELCHER*
disagrees with the administrator
saying that past trends indicate illegal
parking will not be curtailed by the new
measures. Belcher also said that any
decline in parking fine revenues will be
offset by an increase in meter and lot
parking rates. Belcher expects the
rates to be increased soon.
But Murray said, "They (the
citizens) would never let us raise the
rates by more than a nickel an hour at
this point." He added that small raises
could be repeatedly imposed over a
longer period of time.
One of the problems the city has en-
countered is that many cars in town are
registered in the name of students'
parents in another town or state. The
University does not permit the city to
find out the local address of the car
owner, according to Murray.,
Scott said it does not matter if the city
can contact the owner because, "They'll
contact us."

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