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October 11, 1978 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COl
Dodgers
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Davey Lopes they wasted
walloped a pair of homers, driving in selves, with L
,ive runs, and Dusty Baker added a solo explosion.
hot, leading the emotionally-charged The Dodger
os Angeles Dodgers to an 11-5 victory homer, whic
uesday night over the New York starter Ed F
ankees in the opening game of ning, and the
aseball's 75th World Series, against reliev
Lopes' five RBI were one short of the Dodgers' h
orld Series record and keyed the vic- shut the Yan
tory that came on the eve of the funeral before surre
f popular Dodgers coach Jim Gilliam. home run to R
THE DODGERS dedicated this New York's
eries to Gilliam and wore black pat- Jackson, whl
ches with the No. 19 on their sleeves in Series a year
memory of their coach, who died of a ended a strin
brain hemorrhage Sunday night. And out innings bl

P SERIES OPENER, 11-5

no
Lop
rs c
ch 1
?igul

trample
time asserting them- through the end of the reg
)es leading the long ball and the National Leagi
against Philadelphia.
captain jolted a two-run BUCKY DENT singled
knocked out Yankees more Yankee runs in t
ieroa in the second in- against John, the 35-ye

en added a three-run shot
ver Ken Clay in the fourth.
hurler John, meanwhile,
akees out for six innings
endering a tape-measure
Reggie Jackson leading off
seventh. The homer by
ho hit five in the World
r ago against the Dodgers,
bg of 23 consecutive shut-
by John that had stretched

I

p..-

Yankees
gular season lunge, Lee Lacy walked. The Yankees
ue playoffs executed a sharp double play on a
grounder by Steve Yeager, but then
home two Lopes connected on the next pitch,
;he seventh making it 3-0. Ken Clay relieved for
ar-old left- New York.
THE YANKEES put runners on base
in each of the first three innings. Roy
White was erased on a double play in
the first, Reggie Jackson singled in the
rifs second and Fred Stanley doubled in the
third.
In the fourth, Monday opened with a
walk, raced to third when shortstop
Bucky Dent made a good stop on
Yeager's shot in the hole but threw the
ball away, attempting for the force
play.
That brought up Lopes, who ripped
his second home run of the game into
the left field bleachers. The three-run
shot made it 6-0 Dodgers and gave
Lopes five runs batted in for the game,
one short of the World Series record set
by Bobby Richardson of the New York
Yankees Oct. 8, 1960..
The Dodgers added to their lead in
the fifth. Cey beat out an infield single
that Nettles tried to bare-hand but
join the free failed. Baker followed with his second
hit, a line single to right, sending Cey to
Los Angeles third. Clay wild pitched the runner
but pinch hit- home before Paul Lindblad came on to
ty more BIa MEANWHILE, John ,continued in
nth and then complete control, allowing just two hits
;le to put Los through six innings. The 35-year-old
sinkerball specialist had the Yankees
in the eighth, beating the ball into the ground,
u Piniella's allowing only three balls hit on the fly
cle b Grain out of the infield through six innings.

4

hander who is eligible toj
agent ranks this winter.
That narrowed the the
lead to 7-3 in the seventh, 1
ter Bill North, who had on
season, doubled home
Dodgers runs in the seve
scored on Lee Lacy's sing
Angeles on top 10-3.
The Yanks chased Johni
getting two runs on Lo
ground out and an RI sin;

AP Photo
SHORTSTOP BUCKY DENT of the New York Yankees avoids the slide of Dodger
Rick Monday in the second inning of last night's first World Series game. Monday
got back to second base in time to beat the pickoff throw by Yankee catcher Thur-
man Munson. This marks the second year in a row that these two teams have met
in the fall'classic. Last year the Yankees won the Series in six games.

gp ngll V1 llal i 16Cy u g41
Nettles. Left-hander Terry Forster
replaced John and held the Yanks in
check the rest of the way.
THE 15-HIT Dodgers barrage against
four Yankees pitchers gave Los
Angeles the opening-game victory in
the best-of-seven series which con-
tinues ' tonight at Dodger Stadium.
Catfish Hunter will pitch for New York
and Burt Hooton for the Dodgers.
The dodgers threatened in the first
inning, leaving two men on base. Bill
Russell singled with one out and then
raced to third on a two-out hit-and-run
single by Steve Garvey.
FIGUEROA FELL behind 3-0 against
Ron Cey, then got two strikes on him
before the Dodger third baseman
backed Lou Piniella against the right
field wall with his long drive.
Los Angeles took the lead in the
second inning, scoring three runs on
homers by Dusty Baker and Davey
Lopes and knocking out Figueroa.
Baker's leadoff shot sailed into the
left field bleachers and, after Rick
Monday doubled on a ball that fell just
in front of center fielder Mickey Rivers'

BLUE GREAT RETURNS:
Pistons pick up Green

,V #

AP Photo
OS ANGELES Dodger second baseman Davey Lopes starts his home run trot
as he watches his fourth inning blast clear the fence. It was Lopes' second two-
run home run of the game. His first home run came in the second inning off of
ankee starter Ed Figueroa, and his second came in the fourth against reliever
en Clay.

By PETER BORMUTH
-Former Michigan All-American
Ricky Green joins the Detroit Pistons
after being acquired from Golden State
late Monday evening.
Green, who was Golden State's first
round selection insthe 1977 college draft
comes to the Pistons in exchange for an
undisclosed draft choice. He flew into
Detroit yesterday in time to practice
with the team.
Coach Dick Vitale was enthusiastic
about Green's presence on the roster,
noting that "Ricky has great speed and
leaping ability and we expect him to
give us a few good minutes running the
fast break." Green will not be starting
for the Pistons however, as coach
Vitale stated that "Kevin Porter, Chris
Ford, and John Long are my first three
guards."
Vitale said that he had spoken with
Green before the Pistons obtained him
and that "Ricky knows his role and
knows he has to prove himself. Golden
State gave up on him after they drafted
Ray Townsend and received John
Lucas in compensation for Ricky Barry
and we think that perhaps they were a
little premature."
The 5r10"Green started for Golden
State as a rookie last year, but was ben-
ched in the middle of the season as his

shortcomings as a pro ballplayer
became evident around the league.
In other NBA news, Dave Baxter, a
former teammate of Green's at

JIMMY CARAS
5-time world champion
Pocket Billiard Exhibition
Thurs. Oct. 12-4 PM and PM
MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM
FREE ADMISSION
STEVE'S LUNCH
We Serve Breakfast AllDay *
Try Our Famous 3 Egg Omelet
* with your choice of fresh bean sprouts, mushrooms, *
* green peppers, onion, ham, bacon, and cheese. *
* See Us Also For Our Lunch & Dinner Menus
* 1313 S. University Mon-Sat 8-8, Sun 9-8 769-2288 #,

Michigan, was released by the Seattle
SuperSonics yesterday. Baxter was the
Sonics' third round draft choice last
spring.

DEDICA TION NECESSAR Y:
Women CC Club develops talent

By DIANE SILVER
It's one thing to go out and leisurely
'og three or four miles a couple of days
week, but it's another thing to run ten
miles every day, pushing for five- and
six-minute miles.
The average jogger may find this
routine unusually grueling, but for the
ten members of the Michigan women's
cross country club, this routine
represents their ultimate goal.
In its first year at Michigan, the club
is led by Red Simmons. Known as the
father of women's track and field in
Michigan, Simmons also coaches the
;women's track and field team.
A DEDICATED group of runners
make up the club, which receives no
funds from the University. "All expen-
ses for the club either I'm footing or the
girls are footing," said Coach Sim-
mons.
"The University has not approved a
cross country team for women," Coach
Simmons continued. "Whether they
will in the future, I don't know."
Because women's cross country is not
a varsity sanctioned sport at Michigan,
it has been difficult to recruit long
distance runners. "It's my hope to get a
team here so we can attract some
nationally-ranked girls," said Coach
Simmons.
"We really only have one good
distance runner now. My main objec-
tive is to use this as a conditioning
program for indoor track this winter,"
explained Coach Simmons.
ALL BUT ONE of the club's members
are freshmen and should provide some
stiff competition for the women on last
year's track team. Coach Simmons'
ultimate aim is to get a couple of good
one- or two-milers for the indoor
season.
Although running might not seem like

a sport which requires a great amount
of skill, competitive long distance run-
ners are not made overnight. "If they
want to make the big time they are
going to have to train twice a day six, or
better yet, seven days a week," said
Coach Simmons.
"Physiologically, it takes a girl three
years of consistent running to develop
the capillaries in her legs that carry
blood and oxygen which, in turn,
reduces fatigue," explained Coach
Simmons. As the runner develops the
capillaries, he or she uses oxygen more
efficiently and doesn't have'to work as
hard to run long distances.
Successful competitive running may
also be determined by physique.
Generally a cross country runner has a
slender build. "Even a different kind of
mental attitude is required of a distan-
ce runner," said Coach Simmons.
TREMENDOUS perseverance is
needed by a distance runner, whose
reward comes in competing against,
and placing ahead of, other runners.
The club provides the women harriers
with a chance to enter competitive

meets at other schools with cross coun-
try teams.
This gives the women a chance to see
how they fare against other runners.
But because of the "club" standing, the
harriers do not receive awards or
recognition for their performance.
Despite the disadvantages the club
has to face, it does have a few plisses.
"It's good because it doesn't count
towards my eligibility," said runner
Marianne Dickerson. "I'll still be able
to run competitively for four more
years." Dickerson has been training
occasionally with the men's team as
well as preparing with the women for
the Big Ten championships in two
weeks.

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JOIN THE
DAILY
SPORTS STAFF

But we promise it won't hurt a bit! This is the last

week to have your senior portrait taken for the
MICHIGANENSIAN year book.

1979

Call 764-0561 for an appointment NOW

J

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TO OUR
COORDINATOR-IN-CHIEF:
Relax, we'll treat you
to a 3 martini lunch.

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