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October 07, 1978 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-07

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, October 7, 1978-Page 7

Senate passes tuition,

WANT REGENT ERA SUPPOR T:

tax credit,
From Wire Service Reports'
The Senate, voting on a series of.
amendments to the Finance Commit-
tee's $23 billion tax-cut bill, yesterday
approved a proposal to give parents of
college students a tuition tax credit.
In a flurry of election year activity,
the Senate also voted in favor of Sen.
Edward Kennedy's (D-Mass.), amen-
dment to give middle-income
Americans an additional $3.7 billion tax
break, but turned down a GOP plan for
a tremendous $120 billion, across-the-
board cut.
THE CREDIT, which would start at
$100 per student this year and rise to
$250 in 1980 and 1981, is awaiting final
approval in the House and Senate as a
separate bill. Carter is said to be likely
to veto that bill.
But backers reason he would be much
more reluctant to veto the big tax-cut
bill just to kill the tuition tax credit.
The heavily Democratic Senate
began the day's voting by soundly
defeating 60-36 the Republican Kemp-
Roth proposal, which would reduce in-
dividual income tax rates by an
average of 33 per cent over the next
three years.
SENATOR Robert Griffin (R-Mi.), a
strong supporter of the Kemp-Roth,
plan, voted in the minority yesterday.
While campaigning in Ann Arbor
yesterday, Griffin's opponent in the
November Senate race, Democrat Carl
Levin, called Kemp-Roth "unfair,"
because it "bulges at both ends," giving
no relief to middle income wage ear-
ners, and would prove "inflationary."
Also yesterday, the full Senate voted
53-37 to table a bipartisan tax indexing

tax break
amendment co-sponsored by Griffin to
the Revenue Act of 1978, killing it for
the session. Tax indexing would require
automatic adjustment of tax brackets
to allow for cost-of-living increases,
cutting tax rates by the same percen-
tage as inflation increases.
In a surprise move, the Senate ap-
proved 52-43 the amendment by Ken-
nedy and Dale Bumpers (D-Ark.) that
increases the total tax cut from the
Finance Committee's recommended
$22.9 billion to $26.7 billion. This in-
cludes $3.8 billion which was added to
the committee's proposed $16 billion in
tax cuts for individuals.
NINETY-FIVE per cent of the ad-
ditional reductions would go to those
with incomes under $30,000 a year. The
amendment would mean an extra $130
tax cut for a typical four-member
family with income of $20,000; it would
give only $9 more to a single person at'
that income level.
Senator Russell Long, (D-La.),
chairman of the Senate Finance Com-
mittee, opposed all three amendments
to the bill, which Republicans said
would help the rich and poor but "shor-
tchanges working America."
Congressional observers predicted
Long would fight to eliminate the two
approved amendments when a con-
ference committee tries to work out dif-
ferences between the Senate and House
versions of the legislation.
Long had said Carter would undoub-
tedly veto the GOP plan and the Ken-
nedy amendment "would bust the
budget." He had said he favors a,
college tuition tax credit but expressed
"deep fear" the tax bill might be vetoed
because of it.

CFW weeks to achieve equalit

By HOWARD WITT
The days of struggle against the more
obvious, identifiable signs of sex
discrimination have passed since the
Commission for Women (CFW) was
founded in 1971, and its members have
now turned to "the real business" of
equality between men and wonen.
"We are now at the more subtle level
of changing attitudes and behavior
towards women," said Bernadette
Malinoski, co-chairwoman of CFW.
"NOW THAT the numbers, goals, and
timetables (for the creation of affir-
mative action programs) have been
dealt with to the satisfaction of the
Department of Labor and HEW
(Department of Health, Education and
Welfare), we hope the real business of
developing to the fullest extent the
potential of women and minorities will
begin in earnest," Malinoski continued.
Created as a grassroots organization
seven years ago, CFW has been active
as a watchdog group trying to protect

the rights of women. Members are
drawn from all interest areas of the
University, including students, faculty,
clerical and technical staff, service and
maintenance staff, and professional
and administrative workers. Several
positions on the CFW board are still
open.
Among its many accomplishments,
CFW has maintained publication of the
"Women's Information Network
Bulletin," sponsored a Women's
Career Fair, and worked successfully
for the inclusion of treatment of mater-
nity disability along with other medical
disabilities under University policy.
THE COMMISSION also advocated
open University job postings, which
allow all qualified persons an equal
chance at employment. "Open job
posting minimizes the 'fast shuffling'
which occurs when only a few people
know about available jobs, keeping
women and minorities at a disadvan-
tage," commented Malinoski.

One issue still unresolved is Univer-
sity support of the Equal Rights Amen-
dment (ERA). Last spring, CFW
proposed a resolution for consideration
at a Regents' meeting advocating a
public statement by the University in
favor of ERA.
The proposal was not discussed at the
September Regents' meeting, which
Malinoski said was fortunate because it
would probably have gotten lost amid
the concentration on President Robben
Fleming's resignation. CFW members
are hopeful that the ERA proposal will
be discussed by the Regents in the near
future.
CFW plans to repeat its Women's
Career Fair, which last year was atten-
,ded by over 100 professional women and

600 participants. The Fair, scheduled
for March 24, 1979, will highlight job
opportunities for women.
Lila Green, creator of a new game en-
titled "Which Way ERA?" will be the
featured speaker at the November 8
meeting of. the Commission, scheduled
from 12-1:30 p.m. in Room 2549, LS1
Bbuilding. Meetings are open to the
public.

Do a Tree a Favor:
Recycle Your Daily

BOB FOSEE'S

1972

CABARET
LIZA MINELLI, JOEL GRAY and MICHAEL YORK in the most popular filmed
musical-and deservedly so-of this decade. Based on Isherwood's stories
during the rise of Hitler. It's set in a wild Berlin cabaret that reflects the break-
down of the Wiemar Republic. Winner of 8 Academy Awards. In color.
Sun.: LES BICHES

41

in m U I I L ' U K
DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES - Adults $ .25
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. t:i i:3D P.M. SUN. & HOLS.12 Noon til 1:30 P.M.
EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25
TICKET SALES
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes
prior to showtipne.
2. No tickets sold later than 15 minutes
after showtime.

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 and 9:15

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

4 ellipse -**** :

'U' profs reproduce gene

I-

(Continued from Page 1)
In other cases, an embryo can
receive an extra chromosome from one
of its parents. Instead of two
chromosomes for the same set of
characteristics, the embryo receives
three. This occurs through a process
known as non-disjunction.
If either translocation or non-
disjunction occurs on chromosome 21,
the result is frequently mongolism.
WHAT SCHMICKEL and Wilson suc-
ceeded in doing was to remove a
segment of a gene, reattach it to a
chromosome from a virus which
inhabits the common bacterium e. Coli,
and use the virus to reproduce the gene
fragment.
This technique is the basis of recom-
binant DNA research.
While genes from-Jower, organisms
and mice have been successfully
isolated and recombined in the past,
this is the first time it has been done
with a natural human gene, although
synthetic human genes have previously
been isolated.

This particular gene contains the in-
formation for reproduction of cell
structures known as ribosomes, which
help manufacture proteins. It is found
on chromosome 21 and on four other
chromsosmes as well.
The gene fragment also contains por-
tions of the DNA strands which provide
for the regulation of the gene's activity.
Understanding regulatory failure could
lead to understanding of how genetic
diseases are produced, Jackson said.
Schmickel and Wilson reported their
findings at the annual meeting of the
American Society of Human Genetics
in Vancouver, British Columbia.
Rails hardly ever use flight as a
means of escape, hence making them
especially vulnerable to predators.
Sao Paulo, Brazil, which has
10,500,000 residents and an annual
growth rate of five. per cent, is- the
largest city in North and South
America, according to National
Geographic.,

TOMORROW
Mf ILESTONE JAZZ STA RS

Ron Cart
HILL AUD.-8
Tickets available Mon. 1
at Hill, also Schoolkidsat

er Sonny Rollins
McCoy Tyner
M A$3.50, 4.50, 5.50
11:30-5:30 at Michigan Union Box Office and 6:30-8:00
nd both Discount Records. For more info-763-1453.

*
*

It was the Deltas against
the rules... the rules lost!
NATIONAL
LAMPOON s
A.,,. 4

10:40
1:00
3:30
6:30
9:00
Fri &
Sat
11:00

WOODY ALLEN'S

The University of Michigan Professional Theatre Program
Tonight at 8:00 p.m., Sunday at 2:00 and 8:00 p.m.
SALLY ANN HOWES
EARL WRIGHTSON & LOIS HUNT
~frSWJND
,IA :,W'.-,m v RICHARD RODGERS
" , v~u e rOSCAR HAMMERSTEIN V
~ v.',. ti. HO WARD LINDSAY V hUSSEL GROUSE
. OCT. 6-8 in the POWER CENTEB
Tickets Available at the Power Center Box Office
Saturday 1-5 and 6-8 p.m., Sunday 12-5 and 6-8 p.m.
For further information call 763-3333
Tonite Only!

IN TERIORS'

KRISTEN GRIFFITH
MARYBETH HURT
RICHARD JORDAN
DIANE KEATON
E.G. MARSHALL
G ERALDINE PAGE
MAUREEN STAPLETON
SAM WATERSTON

10:30
1:15
3:45
6:45
9:15

U.N. requests cease-fire
(Continued from Page 1) the three Israeli gunboats that open
Brezhnev and other world leaders fire Thursday night off west ports s
seeking support for their Security the shelling covered the landing
Council cease-fire plea.- Christian reinforcements from so
Washington sources said the United Lebanon. Israeli officials said the bo
States also was urging restraint on attacked a Palestinian guerrilla bas
Israel, whose gunboats late Thursday AT LEAST ONE Palestinian a
unexpectedly shelled Syrian-held West three Syrians were reported wounde
Beirut. Israel has backed the Christians, p
In Israel, Deputy Prime Minister ticularly in south Lebanon, in order
Yigael Yadin said yesterday in an in- keep Palestinian guerrillas away fr
terview with Israel Radio that his coun- the Lebanese-Israeli border.
try was "reviewing the situation in Western diplomats in the Leban
Lebanon from hour to hour and capital, speaking privately, blar
deciding on its actions accordingly." shelling near the U.S. Embassy
HE REITERATED the Israeli gover- Christians seeking to spur fas
nment's vow that "we' will not let the American action to end the furious fi
Christians there be wiped out." day-old battle here between Syr
Continued violence and a deeper in- ' peacekeeping troops, who are tryinj
volvement by Israel on the side of the bring the private right-wing Christ
Christians could undermine the Camp militias under their control, and
David plan for a Mideast peace. Christians, who want the Syrians ou
Some unconfirmed reports here said Lebanon.
cFitzerald to Milliken: PBB
commercial 'tells the truth'

ned
aid
of
uth
ats
e.
and
A.
par-
r to
rom
ese
med
on
ter
ive-
rian
g to
ian
the
at of

CINEMA 1
Angell Hall Aud. A
7:00, 8:45, 10:30

I

(Continued from Page 1)
BUT, WHILE he acknowledged the
verdict on PBB's effect on humans is
unknown, Fitzgerald responded that
the tests on animals give "clear war-
ning" to the dangers of the substance.
"The fact that symptoms described
have occurred in laboratory animals is
hardly proof that PBB poses no health
hazards for hunians as your letter
argues," Fitzgerald said.
Fitzgerald, who returned last night
from Washington after Pope John

Paul's funeral in Rome, said the ad
vertisement will con tinue to be aired
so citizens will "know the truth" about+
PBB.
Fitzgerald did not comment on his
private meeting with Carter yesterday,
at which time he was expected to ask
the President to stump for him in the
state. Senator Edward Kennedy (D-
Mass.) has already agreed to keynote a
$100-a-seat dinner honoring Fitzgerald
in Detroit in October.

$1.50
Sun.: BABIES & BANNERS
A2 Premierel
Wed.: Cuban Film Festival
THE LAST SUPPER
ART CARNEY and LILY TOMLIN share the fast-paced action in a detective thriller
that will keep you somewhere between the middlie and edge of your seat.
"A funny, tightly constructed knowledgeable film."-Vincent Canby. "A first-
class entertainment. It represents by for the most intelligent and engaging
attempt at reincarnation of the private eye. Lily Tomlin is just about perfect."
-TIME. Plus Short-RACKETEER RABBIT-Bugs Bunny in a gangster parody
with Edward G. Robinson and Peter Lorre. Directed by Robert Benton (1977).
MANN THEATRES Wed. Matinees
FXILLAGET N All seats $1 .50
MAPLE VILLAGE SHOPPING LINTER
769-130~ until 4:30
F"hra sfSHOW
"Oie Exr s"TIMES
Sot-Sun-Wed
1:30
4:00
r 6:30
9:05
Mon-Tues-
Thurs-Fri
6:30
9:05
PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS SHOW

R

10:15
12:30
3:00
7:00
9:45

"THE BOYS FROM BRAZIL" Executive Producer ROBERT FRYER
Music by JERRY GOLDSMITH Screenplay by HEYWOOD GOULD
From the novel by IRA LEVIN Produced by MARTIN RICHARDS
and STANLEY O'TOOLE Directed byFRANKLIN j. SCHAFFNER

the ARK Presents
FRI.-SAT.-OCT. 6-7
SANDY IVES and
KENDALL MORSE

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