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October 06, 1978 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-06

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Page 2-Friday, October 6, 1978-The Michigan Daily

FREE
POCKET BILLIARDEEXHIBITION
with
JIMMY CARAS
FIVE TIME WORLD CHAMPION
Thurs.Oct. 12-4-PM and 8 PM
MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM

Suit is filed for-battered women

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By MARION HALBERG
The Washtenaw County Legal Aid Society has filed
a suit calling for increased protection for women who
have been battered by their spouses and boyfriends.
The suit seeks protection of women whose safety is
endangered because their names and addresses are
available to the public through the Department of
Social Services (DSS).
SUSAN BITTNER, attorney for the Legal Aid
Society, is representing a group of battered women -
enrolled in Aid to Families with Dependent Children
(AFDC) - in a class action suit against DSS Director
John Dempsey.
Bittner said the statute which makes the
information public is "a terrible invasion of privacy
to people on AFDC."
Specifically, the suit is aimed at protecting several
women who belong to Safehouse, a local shelter for
battered women which is run by the Domestic
Violence Project. To date, the Legal Aid Society has
succeeded in obtaining temporary injunctions
preventing the DSS from revealing information on
the women.
A HEARING ON the case which was originally
scheduled for last Monday was postponed until
November 16. But a temporary restraining order was
issued Monday to protect the women in the suit until
the hearing is held.
Bittner wants to see the statute declared invalid.

"The main thing that we're saying is that this
statute violates the federal law that governs state
welfare programs," she said: "But the state is
arguing that there is another division in the act that
permits them to give this information."
BUT DSS Legal Affairs Director Russell Hendrick
said the department's hands are tied in these cases.
'Everytime we get a woman run-
ning for her life we have to go out
and get injunction. It's (the bill)
simply to protect welfare recipients
from people with malicious intent
-intent to harm.
-Kathleen Fojtik, Washtenaw
County Commissioner
"We recognize that the suit is necessary in order to
protect people," he stated. "We're sympathetic
toward the suit, but our hands are tied because of the
law. There's a sanction in the law that says if we don't
give out the information, then we'll be going against
the law."
Two bills have been introduced in the state

legislature that would change the statute so on
names of the people on AFDC would have to 1
revealed, not their addresses. The House bill
bottled up in the Committee on Health, whi
companion legislation has yet to be acted on in ti
Senate.
KEN SCHEFFLER, an aide to Democratic stat
Sen. John Otterbacher, said the bills would "proviii
additional information as to what is described a
confidential, information that cannot b
disclosed . . .it would further restrict what ti
department could reveal."
Washtenaw County Commissioner Kathleen Fojtti
former Safehouse director, said "changing the law"
more important than the court case."
Fojtik, who is pushing for the passage of the Senat
bill, said, "Every time we get a woman running t
her life, we have to go out and get injunctions. It (tb
bill) is simply to protect welfare recipients frdr
people with malicios intent - intent to harm.'
Lorraine Lafata, a Safehouse volunteer, said tli
proponents of the court case and the bills aren
against the right to freedom of information.
"One of our real worries is that the case wouli
result -in the closing up of DSS's records," she said
"We just want it known that in life-threatenint
situations, addresses should not be disclosed."

Wayne sheriff tied to spy group

By LEONARD BERNSTEIN
The Wayne County Sheriff's office
has admitted for the first time that it
has connections with the controversial
Law- Enforcement Intelligence Unit
(LEIU), according to Wayne County
Commissioner Rose Mary Robinson.
Robinson said yesterday that Wayne
County Under-Sheriff Loren Pittman
told her the office had "strong contact"
with the LEIU in the past and that it
still maintains "liaisons" with the
organization.
LEIU IS A nationwide clearing house
for information gathered by local and
state police agencies. Although its
charter. limits it to investigation of
"organized crime" figures and ac-
tivities, the LEIU has come under
sharp attack for compiling files on in-
dividUals, such as political activists,
with no arrest records or arrest records
not related to organized crime.

Members of the Campaign to Stop
Government Spying (CSGS) released
information two weeks ago indicating
that LEIU member groups had com-
piled information on citizens engaged in
actions protected by the First Amen-
dment. CSGS representatives released
eight copies of LEIU file cards obtained
from the Subversive Unit of the Chicago
Police Department, showing that in-
formation was gathered on the political
activities of individuals with limited or
non-existent arrest records.
Robinson said that recent newspaper
stories about Detroit-area law enfor-
cement agencies' connections to LEIU
caused her to check the trip vouchers of
Wayne County Sheriffs' office travels:
ONE SUCH voucher listed a trip to
Phoenix for a conference during which
law enforcement officials "met to
gather information on drug dealers,"
Robinson said. That voucher was suf-

ficiently vague to cause her to be
suspicious about the reason for the trip.
Robinson then decided to ask Under-
Sheriff Pittman if the sheriff's office
was involved in LEIU.

ROBINSON added she has written
letter to Wayne County Sheriff Williai
Lucas requesting information on th
extent of his office's involvement wit
LEIU.

Members

of

paign to Stop G(
Spying (CSGS)
information ti
ago indicating
member groups
piled informati
zens engaged in

the Cam- Howard Simon, executive director
the Detroit chapter of the America
wernment Civil Liberties Union, helped Robinso
draft the questions after she broughtt
released formation concerning LEIU to him. A
rvo weeks cording to Simon, the letter asks for th
length of the sheriff's office's - *
that LEIU volvement with LEIU, and details co
cerning expenses incurred by Luca
had com- office as a result of membership.
on on - The letter also asks whether the o
2 activities fice receives information on "i
the First dividuals ho do not possess a record
arrests or Whose air-est record does ri
indicate participation in organize
crime."
nk were they in Robinson said she plans to mak
son stated. Lucas' answers to her questions public

protected

by

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your suit. Or jeans. Or cords. Shoes you can live in. Good looks, style,
comfort from Bass. See them soon.

Amendment.
"I asked him point bla
and he said yes," Robins

DOWNTOWN
217 S. Main St.
Open Mon. and Fri.
Nites 'til 8:30

TWO STORES

CA MPUS
619 E. Liberty
Open Fri. Nite
til 7:00

THISADIO
Moe INNER
More than fifty percent of the world is starving.
Another twenty percent, just plain hungry. And yet, in the
face of starvation, they have hope. Hope that the rains will
return to the African Plain. Hope that the Asian rice crop
will be bigger this year. Hope that someone, anyone, with
anything to offer will come to help them fight the battle for
life. Someone in the Peace Corps. They'd like to stand up
for themselves, these prisoners of fate, but they're just
too weak to stand up. But with the Peace Corps a flame
begins to flicker. They've seen other like you before. Seen
the changes you can bring. Two thousand wells on the
parched earth of Sahel. Seen how their knowledge helped
reduce the grain losses. Who are they? They're people
pretty much like you. People with commitment and skills
who've assessed their lives and decided .there must be
more than just having a job. They looked into themselves
and knew it was time for the talk to end and the work to
begin. They're very special people, these people. Totally
prepared to give everything they've got. And getting back
even more than they give. That's the beauty of the Peace
Corps. The work is hard and the pay is
lousy, and the progress comes a drop
at a time. But the rewards are infinite.
Join the Peace Corps and then
take a good long look in the mirror.
You'll never look the same to
yourself again.
The Peace Corps is alive and
well. Call toll free:
! >800-424-8580. Or write: The
Peace Corps, Box A,
Washington, D.C. 20525
.4y'
............or

DEPT. OF PHILOSOPHY
is sponsoring a public lecture by
DR. ARYEH NEIER
Visiting Prof. at New York University Law School
Former Executive Director of American Civil Liberties Union 1970-78
"Defending Freedom for the Enemies of Freedom:
American Nazis and Free Speech"
Rackham Amphitheatre Monday, Oct. 9 4 p.m.
M.D./O.V.M. In European
Medical & Veterinary Schools
The Institute of International Medical Education offers total
medical education leading to practice in the U.S.
1. Direct admission into accredited medical schools in Italy
and Spain.
2. Master of Science Degree in cooperation with recognized
colleges and universities in the U.S. leading to advanced
placement in Spanish, Italian or other foreign medical
schools or veterinary medical schools.
3. While in attendance at the medical school, the Institute will
provide a supplemental Basic Medical Sciences Cur-
riculum which prepares students for transfer into an
American medical school (COTRANS).
4. For those students who do not transfer, the Institute pro-
vides accredited supervised clinical clerkships at
cooperating U.S. hospitals.
5. During the final year of foreign medical schoolthe Institute
provides a supplemental and comprehensive clinical
medicine curriculum which prepares the student to take
the ECFMG examination.
6. IF YOU ARE NOW-OR WILL BE-THE POSSESSOR
OF AN M.S. OR Ph.D. DEGREE IN THE SCIENCES,
WE CAN OFFER YOU ADVANCED PLACEMENT
INA EUROPEAN MEDICAL SCHOOL.
The Institute has been responsible for processing more
American students to foreign medical schools than any
other organization.
INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL EDUCATION
Chartered by the Regents of the University of the State of New York
3 East 54 Street, New York10022 (212) 832-2089

looking for a mate?
Advertise in the
Personals
Call
764-0557

10 PERCENTER 4
CALGARY, Alberta (AP)-Tar sand
and heavy oil deposits found throughou
-Alberta are estimated to hold mop
than six times the oil reserves of Saud
Arabia, but present technology cat
recover only 10 percent of this oil.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LIX, No. 26
Friday. October 6, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the Universit
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Secogd clga
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 4810.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morhinj
during the Universityyear at 420 MaynardStre e
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $1
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mai
outside Ann Arbor.w
Summer session published through Saturdh
morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor
$7.00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

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