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September 07, 1978 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'age 36-Thursday, September 7, 1978-The Michigan Daily
FROM REC SPORTS TO OFFICIATING

Relax,

IM has

it all

By BOB MILLER
Time is winding down, your team
:rails by one... the enemy quarterback
irops back for a pass-and YOU inter-
3ept it for the winning touchdown,
iving your team the championship.
NO, IT ISN'T a special segment of
'Fantasy Island," the aforementioned
ituation could actually occur, provided
ou are competing in the University's
ntramural sports program.
So what if you are only 150 pounds and
ear glasses, if football is your forte,
M has a program for you. Of if you are
nly 5-8, but harbor dreams of popping
iome the points in basketball, the IM
lepartment can service your needs.
At Michigan, students have a
lethora of facilities to indulge in,
lepending on the season and particular
nterest.
LAST SCHOOL YEAR over 17,500
eople participated in Michigan's
'ecreational sports (informal, or drop-
n) program and the more competitive
.M. f
The recreational sports department
>ffers activities ranging from club
;ports (See Tom Stephens' orticle on
age 37). to special events, like the
opular all-nighter at the Central Cam-
>us Recreational Building (CCRB).

"THE GOALS AND objectives are to
provide a wide range of recreational
activities," said Bette Skandalis of the
Rec Sports Department. "Sports don't
have to be threatening or necessarily
competitive. It should be good for the
body as well as the soul."
That includes things like swimming,
jogging, weight lifting, pick-up basket-

them to do "field work." For more in-
formation on a job, contact the Rec
Sports office at 763-3084-although you
still have to go through Vocational
Field Studies.
IF THE CCRB is just a little too far
away, but you are taking up residence
in or around North Campus, the
University thoughtfully added a

Recreational
~ 0*sSPOTS
Intramural Building: NCRB:
M-tuda .m.10p.m. M-F 7 a.m.-10 p.m.
Saturday, 8 a.m.-10 p.m.
Sunday, 3 p.m.-10 p.m. Sunday, 2 p.m-1 p.m.
CCRB:Sudy2pm-0..
M-F,7:45 a.m.-9 p.m. HOURS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE
Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Sunday, CLOSED

in touch football, or belt a birdie in
badminton if you so desire.
BESIDES THE CCRB and NCRB, the
Intramural Sports Building on Hoover
Street is one of the mainstays of studen-
ts looking for some physical activity.
These three buildings house swim-
ming pools, basketball courts (which
can be converted to tennis or volleyball
courts), paddleball-racketball-squash
rooms, running tracks, weight rooms
and just about anything and everything
needed to justify staying away from the
school books.
The IM also breaks up into different
divisions to try to achieve parity bet-
ween teams. The divisions are: Co-
Recreational, Women, Men, Residence
Halls, All Campus, Fraternity, Faculty-
Staff/Graduate Students and Indepen-
dent.
FINALLY, IF YOU like to participate
in sports, but as an official rather than
a player, the intramural department
not only would welcome your assistan-
ce, but if needed, they will train and
prepare you for the sport you want to
referee.
There is a fee of $15 to enter a team in
IM, but that assessment takes care of
any and all teams you get up for the en-
tire fall term.
Also, some sports have a "second half
season" in winter term, like ice hockey,
basketball, bowling and a number of
the indoor athletics.
If there are any questions, the Rec-
Sports and IM departments have han-
dbooks and pamphlets for you.

Defense is domineering
(Continued from Page 29)
choice except to pass. Once again it is the front seven who are given a great deal of
responsibility in nullifying the aerial attack.
"We have to improve in basically two areas. One, we have to get our linemen
to pressure the passer, and second, we must improve our underneath coverage,"
McCartney explained.
His relative lack of concern about the secondary is somewhat surprising in
that three of the four positions are vacant.
Michigan no longer enjoys the likes of Jim Pickens at safety, Derek Howard at.
strong cornerback or Dwight Hicks at the wolfman position.
Junior Mike Hardin appears destined to step in at safety. At the beginning of
spying drills, no one was sure who would be roaming in the secondary. But by the,
end of the season Hardin had pretty much nailed down the job.
"Mike came on real strong in drils," McCartney noted. "He seems to have.
taken that position. Gene Bell was also impressive during our spring drills and it
looks as though he'll be starting."
The strong cornerback slot is wide open. Schembechler is looking at last year's
substitute, Mark Bramman, reserve weak cornerback Stu Harris and Gerald
Diggs to battle for the spot.
They are also waiting to take a quick look at Brian Carpenter, a freshman'
from Flint. Unless the youngster makes good, the betting man's money would be
on Harris to take the field against Illinois in the opener.
The only experience in the backfield rests with junior Mike Jolly, a slender,
weakside cornerback. Jolly only broke up one pass last year and intercepted
another, which he returned 50 yards for a touchdown against Texas A&M.
Triple option a threat
(Continued from Page 29)
depth at this critical position has always been an identifying mark of Schem-
bechler's teams.
In fact, the luxury of backfield depth has made Schembechler reconsider his
offensive philosophy. In spring practice, he toyed some ,with the wishbone, the
system invented by Darrell Royal which teams such as Texas and Oklahoma have
used to dominate the national scene the past ten years.
Another problem with the wishbone is that it tends to further cut out the pass
from what is an already conservative offense. Other teams that have succeeded
consistently (USC, Stanford) use the pass liberally. Michigan uses it when
desperate, such as when Washington led them 27-7 in the Rose Bowl.
Leach, who has had problems perfecting the pass to the degree he controls the
option, led a stirring comeback with his arm that fell just short when an apparent
touchdown pass bounced crazily off Edwards' shoulder and into the diving arms of
a Washington linebacker,
Will memories of that second half precipitate more airborne pigskins this fall?
"I've always said Leach could pass if he practices it," said Schembechler. "With
guys like Ralph Clayton (24 catches last year for a 20-yard average), Mark Sch-
merge, Gene Johnson (both tight ends) and Rodney Feaster, we'll be passing -
though probably not enough to please the critics."
One problem may be protection. While the top five rushers and the top six pass
catehers from last year all return, the offensive line has been hurt badly by
graduation. Gone are Mike Kenn and Mark Donahue, a pair of oversized
Chicagoans who could blow holes in defensive lines wider than Woody Hayes. Gone
is Walt Downing, who played so well at center after being shifted there his junior
year.
Bill Dufek, who missed all of last year with a broken leg, will be back at tackle.
But besides Schmerge and Johnson, the starters joining him will be basically inex-
perienced.
"No surprises, really," is how McCartney sums things up. "We'll be good, but
Ohio State is just as quick and probably a little bigger."

ball games, table tennis, and any of the
other available programs.
Another opportunity that the Rec
Sports people have to offer is to join

I

building appropriately called the North
Campus Recreation Building (NCRB).
It has all the comforts of the CCRB and
it is right in your backyard.
But, if competition is in your system,
and you haven't gone through with-
drawal yet, the intramural department
will support your habit with nearly 20
sports durng fall term.
You can trounce a foe in tennis, bomb
the enemy in basketball, tackle a team

SINCE 1935

I

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ICE
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% mommomo

(apt

ESTAB.1921

Ve4

CLOTHING

SHOES
Men's and Women's
ins ,

SketMcL Sweio

Weej

1;

!.'

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Van Boven sweaters continue to be knitted
on hand frames in the old traditional man-
ner-from shetland wool spun by one of
Scotland's finest spinners. Wool from the
Shetland Island Sheep is noted for its soft
luxurious hand, and when knitted on hand
frames, the finished sweater has a distinc-
tive character not found elsewhere.
It r

This is the original worn by more
generations of Michigan students than
any other we know of.
Handsewn in a genuine moccasin
construction for strength and comfort,
timeless in style.

The ultimate in comfortable, long
wearing footwear. Rugged waxed
leather uppers mounted on
virtually indestructible Goodyear
Rubber Shoes.
Several styles to choose from in
men's and women's sizes.

I

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We also present a large selection of lambs
wool and cashmere sweaters plus many
styles not illustrated, such as sleeveless
pullovers and cardigans. See Ann Arbor's
largest and most comprehensive selection
ever offered. It's-wise to buy on campus.

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