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October 03, 1978 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-03

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 3, 1978-Page 3

IrycU SEE t&,S KPk) CALZ5 UJt

BARRAGE FIER CEST IN RECENT MEMOR Y:

4

Syriaii
BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP) - Under the
cover of one of the fiercest artillery and
rocket attacks in recent memory here,
Syrian troops yesterday rescued 50
fellow soldiers who had been trapped
for two days by Christian militiamen.
Meanwhile, President Elias Sarkis
promised to try to make another at-
tempt at ending the warfare that has
killed and wounded hundreds in less
than a week.
RIGHTISTS SAID 32 Lebanese were

Disco diner
With a scheduled cafeteria menu dicidedly outside the usual quaddie
and cold pizza fare, foor service workers at East Quad have cooked up
a dinner meal tonight with a special "twist"-a "Disco Dinner."
Slatedfor the Quad's South Cafeteria between 6:00 and 7:30, residents
will have to "get down" a topical dinner before the floor is cleared for
diapcing. One food service worker described the meal as a "welcome
monotkiy-breaker," and the Service went wild making up a disco
menu.-included in tonight's fare are: "Average Whitefish," "Bee
Gee's and Cheese," "Donna Summer Squash," "More Than A Salad,"
"Andy:Gibb's ribs," "K.C. and the Sunshine Bread," and "Wild
CherryPie." We just hope people at-East Quad don't come down with
a case4Tuesday night fever after all the disco food is downed.
Tap~e te n
In t? first wave of a growing national boycott of California table
grapes a union of housewives, students and clergy picketed an A&P
store a Huron Street, on a cold October 3, 1968. Supporting the efforts
of Wes Coast farm workers and leader Cesar Chavez, the picketers
voweco stay in front of the store, working in shifts, until the grapes
were tken off the shelves of the store. Earlier that week the Student
Govemnent Council had called for the Union, the League, and all food
servics on campus to co-operate with the boycott. Also that chilly Oc-
tober Jay, Curtis Lemay joined George Wallace as his vice presiden-
tial rtning-mate, urging more military pressure on North Vietnam.

i troops.
killed and more than 200 wounded in the
clashes. Sixteen buildings were
demolished and 61 apartments were set
on fire as the Syrians advanced.
The heavy barrage of artillery
rockets, mortars and machineguns
subsidediat daybreak, but all routes in-
to Christian East Beirut were blocked
by the Syrian roadblocks and sniper
fire.
The fighting continued into daylight
hours as militia bands tried to pry
Syrian troops from two bridges leading

Wo-men 'sleague aids
hopes for peace

into the Christian sector of Beirut. The
bridges control the militia's supply
lines.
THE RIGHT-WING "Voice of
Lebanon" claimed the militia
destroyed 12 Syrian artillery batteries
in the hills overlooking the capital. The
Syrians had no comment on the claim,
which could not be independently
verified.
Police estimated that 215 civilians
had been killed and about 500 woutided
in fighting since Wednesday.
East Beirut's morgues and hospitals
are reported clogged and blood banks
drained. The Christians reported more
than 30 bodies were pulled from the
rubble of collapsed buildings in one
area during a lull in the fighting.
IN, HIS ADDRESS, President Sarkis
promised to come up with a new gover-
nment and a new security plan within 10
days to stem fighting. Government
sources said the president needed time
to talk with Syrian President Hafez
Assad, due to return to Damascus from
East Germany and Moscow at the end
of the week.

blitz Lebanon

Sarkis said he would bring opposing
pdliticians into his new government, a
plan he tried unsuccessfully last spring.
Sarkis did not give details of his new
peace plan, or say why he expected it to
work, other than to say he foresaw "a
new Lebanon better than before and
much better than now."
Last spring, Prime Minister Selim El
Hoss and his cabinet' resigned because
they were unable to deal with the
clashes between rightist Christian
militia bands and the Syrians.

I,

..

LAST CHANCE
for
644 per game
Men's, Women's, Mixed

0

r 3

Ha.)penings.-.-.-
..:proliferate today, commencing at noon on the Diag with a rally
for Lbby Maynard, Michigan's first-woman candidate for Lieutenant
Govenor, and for other Democratic candidates ... before you think
aboula post-rally rest, however, keep in mind the University Center
for Ontinuing Education for Women is sponsoring a brown bag lunch
fronmoon to 1:30, titled "Re-Entry '78." All women who have returned
to tls University after an absence are invited to attend the lunch,
whin is designed to help returning women meet others who are coping
wittthe challenges pf re-entering the campus community ... after an
aftenoon of recooperation, there is a meeting of -the Michigan L-5
Soaety at 7:30,- concerning the colonization and industialization of
spore. The meeting is held in conference room one of the Union, and
the-e will be a slide presentation. New members interested in "the
final frontier" are invited ... in a similar vein, the aminators who
worked on Star_wars will soeak at 8:00 in the Dow Auditorium of the
Towsley Cente- for Continuing Medical Education. Tom DeFanti and
Dan Sandlin, fom the Chicago Circle Graphics Habitat, will present a
computer grapics demonstration called "Electronic Visualization."
This is the secmd event in the School of Engineering's Department of
Humanities seies on Art and Technology. A few tickets are still
available, andzan be picked up at the Humanities Department Office
... .finally, apair of reminders: graduate portraits are now being
taken for the X79 Michiganensia. Call Monday through Friday or stop
by the officeit 420 Maynard for an appointment. Also, October 2-6
marks the fial registration period for the International Center's
grade schootessons in French, German, and Spanish. Call the inter-
national Cen r for more info. Au revoir!
Vladinir boogies
cAncert 4as a.Vin ir Jorowitz celebrated his 75th birthday
doing the bogie into the early hours Monday with New York's disco
night crawsrs at flashy Studio 54. Horowitz cut a mean figure on the
strobe-lit once floor with his wife, Wanda, who says she normally
doesn't inalge. But "this is his birthday," she told a photographer,
"so I'll donything he wants." And Bianca Jagger, wife of the Rolling
Stones siger and .a regular at the popular night so)pot, went behind
the bar tserve a lirthday drink to the man she calls her "favorite
pianist." he -tended bar for over an hour and pulled down some of
"the beg tips" owner Steve Rubell says he's ever seen. Fashion
designerialston gave her $20 and Rubell says he even thinks Horowitz
gave heV50.
Se ve dirty words
Whefleorge Carlin used those now infamous seven dirty words
over thradio air waves in New York he could not have predicted the
sort of fsponse his monologue has evoked. When the Portland Press
Heraldiffered to mail readers a list of the seven dirty words they too
were igndated with positive responses. "My curiosity is killing me,"
said oiTennessian. "I have been on this planet for 55 years and spent
four yars of this in the U.S. Army, but for the life of me I cannot
recall even dirty words ... I was of the opinion I knew them all."
Anothc respondent from Upton, Massachusetts said, "I am 69 years
old art would like to know the seven words. I most likely will not know,
the mnaning but perhaps my son will enlighten me." This past
Januay the Daily published Readers from as far away as West Ger-
manysent letters asking for the seven dirty words. Well kiddies, we
publised them in January and here they are again: shit, piss, fuck,
cuntmother fucker, cocksucker, and tits. If you need any ex-
plansions, just stop by the Daily.
Oi the outside. "
Sarcely giving them a chance to drip-dry after Saturday's down-
pou, you may have to haul out your ponchos and umbrellas sometime
todyt. Quite possibly the day will go something like this: as the chilly
airparly in the morning communnicates an ominous atmosphere, the
disnally gray clouds orchestrated to sweep the heavens assure you
thw worst is to come. In time, it does - the sky opens up, a long
pasage of basso pr0fundo thundering falls down, and lightning is con-
duzte from the earth. All this might make a great tone poem - but as
fa; as being the weather, well, nobody ever wants an encore. Chances
of percipitation tomorrow are 30 per cent, and winds should be
tpveling at a 10-15 mile per hour clib. The high will reach about 700. If
idoes rain, you ca4 always listen to some music.

By PAT HENRY
Sometimes it seems like the Peace
Movement has faded. The end of the
Vietnam War marked a substantial halt
to non-violent and peace-promoting
demonstrations.
The local branch of the Women's In-
ternational League for Peace and
Freedom (WILPF) in Ann Arbor and
Ypsilanti hasn't stopped functioning; it
has been spreading the word of peace
for almost seven decades. WILPF was
founded by suffrage leaders in the early
days of World War I to seek ways to end
fighting. Jane Addams, the first woman
to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, was
the first international president of the
League.
AFTER THE first world war ap-
proximately 1,000 women met at the
Hague in the Netherlands and resolved
to work for "the achievement by
peaceful means of these political econ-
omic, social and social and
psychological conditions throughout the
world which can assure peace,
freedom, and justice for all."
Internationally, WILPF works with
the United Nations in the areas of world
hunger, world development and human
rights. Nationally, the League bans to
combat racism and sexism. They ad-
vocate all aspects of civil rights and
civil liberties and support con-
stitutional rights for all people,
abolition of capital punishment, penal
system reform, separation of the chur-
ch and the state, full amnesty, national
health care, and immediate halt to'all
nuclear power projects.
Anything which suggests non-
violence, WILPF supports.
"IN GENERAL, we are a pacifist
organization who promotes peace and
better relations between people," says
member Ruth Graves of Ypsilanti.
The theme for WILPF year 1978-79 is
Human Rights. An activity is planned
for at least once a month. Most
meetings are Saturday mornings and
held at the Ann Arbor Public Library at
343 South 5th St. For more information
call local coordinator Edith Heffly at
482-0546.
Throughout October the League is
presenting a UN program to area junior
high social studies classes. "We offer
films and literature which acquaints
children with the existence of the UN
and what it does," explains Lillian

Zaret, League member of 25 years.
ON {OCTOBER 21, United Nations
Day, WILPF is hosting a talk with Nan-
cy Ramsey, Washington, D.C. League
representative who heads WILPF lob-
by.
In November a discussion will be held
on "Human Rights and U.S. Policy in
the Far East. South Africa will be the
subject in December. A film "Last
Grave of Dimbasa" will be shown Dec.
9.
In January the League has planned a
slide show and discussion titled "Con-
science and War Taxes" and February
focuses on Women's Rights,
specifically the strike at J. P. Stevens.
A LARGE AND successful project of
the Ann Arbor group is what the League
calls "counter recruitment coun-
seling." For the past two years when
the ROTC representatives enter the
local high schools, WILPF stands right
beside them distributing pamphlets and
a sourcebook written by their task force
on militarism.
"Our material simply fills in what the
military literature leaves out," says
Graves to further explain that
"military service means killing people.
It's not all joyous travel" as pictured in
ROTC brochures.
According to Tom Skjei at Ann Ar-
bor's Navy recruiting office the League
has been successful in limiting the
recruiting efforts of all branches of
ROTC.
"Yeah, they've influenced the school
board. They (the board) are running
around like headless chickens saying,
'We don't want you here because we've
got this league of women on our
backs' . WILPF have had their impact
and because of them, we are only
allowed in the schools once a year."
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LIX, No. 23
Tuesday, October 3. 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street.
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscriptiop rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters);413 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published through Saturday
morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

Roger Corman Double Feature
LITTLE SHOP OF HORROS (at 7 & 10)
JACK NICHOLSON, JACKIE JOSEPH and JONATHON HAZE star in the 'tale of
simple-minded Seyrrore who, in an attempt to impress his girl, develops a
hybrid plant with a taste for blood. Corman's excursion into camp with young
Nicholson in his best early role as the pain-loving dentist's patient.
BUCKET OF BLOOD (at 8:30 only)
Corman manages to beat the beat in the Beat Generation! This demented
horror parody was shot by Corman on a now-legendary {5-day shooting
schedule. An R.C. Production-really crazy.

SIGN UP

0.

Union Lones

CINEMA GUILD

Both shows-$2.50
Each show-$1.50

OLD ARCH.
AUD.

Viewpoint Lectures Presents:
William F. Buckley Jr.
"Some of the Problems
of Freedom"
of
Hill Auditorium 8:00 pm
TuesdayOcI

for info
call UAC,
763-4182

tickets 1.50
available at Michigan
Union or at the door f

TONITE-;CUBAN FILM FESTIVAL

"A FASCINATING ACHIEVEMENT...WISE, SAD AND OFTEN
FUNNY...HUGELY EFFECTIVE AND MOVING AND IT IS COM-
PLETE IN THE WAY THAT VERY FEW MOVIES EVER ARE."
jilV incent Canby, New York Times

"it is a miracle...a
beautifully understated
film, sophisticated
and cosmopolitan in
style, fascinating
in its subtlety
and complexity.'
-Peter Schjeldahl,
New York Times

"'Memories' has been
widely praised by critics
here and abroad. It
demands your attention
as cinema, as politics,
as a penetrating
view of Cuba.'
-Archer Winsten,
N.Y. Post

The UnIversity of Michigan Professional Theatre Pr9gram

The University of Michigan

Professional Theatre Pr9gram

,.

Tickets Now On Sale
SALLY ANN HOWES
EARL WRIGHTSON & LOIS HUNT
in

"CLEARLY A MASTERPIECE-'MEMORIES' IS BRILLIANT,
INTRICATE, IRONIC AND EXTREMELY INTELLIGENT."
-Arthur CooperNewsweek
"MEMORIES OF UNDERDEVELOPMENT"
In less than 20 years, the tiny socialist Cuba has developed the most advanced
and exciting film industry in Latin America. Cinema 11 proudly presents the
first Cuban film to circulate in the U.S. Memories of Underdevelopment.
FRI: LOONEY TUNES REVIEW Part 5: Chuck Jones
SAT: Lily Tomlin & Art Carney in THE LATE SHOW

I

SOUND,
MUSKBY RCHARD RODGE RS
O F 1 RGSF v Ise OSCAR HAMME RSTEIN it
Boo.By HOWARD LINDSAY ANDRUSSEL CROUSE
',IGGE S T FD BY
f 4f TRAPP F AMIAY SINGERS HY MARIA HARP
~.' -..'%also starring
TERRY SAUNDERS
OCT. 6-8 in the POWER CEN
The PTP Ticket Office is located in The Michigan League.
Hours: 10a.m.- 1 pm. and 2-5 pm., weekdays
For information call 764-0450.

CINEMA II

Rescheduled- NAT. SCI. AUD.
TONITE 7& 9 $1.50

MANN THEATRES
FwV(LLAGETW"
MAPLE VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER
T69.1300

WED. MATINEES
ALL SEATS $1.50
UNTIL 4:30

3 MAN OF
LO;MANCHR
TICKETS NOW ON SALE
At Ticket Central, Michigan Union, or by mail
Circle dat tickets desired:
Novembe 2, 3, 4, 8, 9; 10 at 8 p.m.
Novembe 5 at 2 p.m.
Novenb 11 at 2 p.m. and 9 p.m.
$4. 50-enter orchestra and balcony

SHOWTIMES
SUN-WED-SAT
1:15 3:45
6:45 9:20
Mon-Tues-Thurs-Sat
6:45
9:20

Paramount Pictures Presents
.,.~~44S

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