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September 29, 1978 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Fall bri
By KAREN BORNSTEIN
It's inevitable - -fall is here, so why
ot enjoy it and reap in a harvest taking
lace right on campus grounds? The
arvest is the annual Fall Art Fair
king place September 30th and Oc-
ober 1st on the Michigan Union lawn.
he festive event will overflow with the
reshest creative expressions, ready to
shared with the public at last after
riods of hard work and growth.
The Fall Art Fair will be more than a
leasurable exhibition of works by 75
rtists and craftspeople who come from
11 over Michigan, and areas of Ohio,
isconsin, Illinois and Iowa. It will be a
elting pot for all of the arts, and
hould successfully blend music, dance,
ne arts, theatre performances and
emonstrations of various artistic
echniques, to form one gala kick-off for
e new art season.
SPONSORED BY the University of
lichigan Artists and Craftsmen Guild,
is fair will not feature the Mexican
ugs, decoupage purses or tie-dyed T-
hirts so many winced at while atten-
ing certain areas of the annual Sum-
er Art Fair. The Guild has a set of
ndards and rules which every artist
ust agree to before exhibiting in any
uild fair or show.
The major rule is that all works must
e handcrafted to help insure that
... each product sold at a Guild fair
r show isof original design and fully
andcrafted from beginning to end by
'e individual artist selling it."
Therefore, the fair will be brimming
ith a full range of original artistic
reations. Tempting those who attend
ill be handcrafted jewelry, functional.
nd decorative ceramics including
ku pots, bamboo flutes, batik and
ilkscreen wallhangings, stuffed toys,

The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 29, 1978-Page 7

ngs artists to Union lawn

paintings and stained and etched glass,
which is slowly becoming accepted and
appreciated as a true expressive art
form.
BUT, NOT ALL art must follow con-
ventions, and be displayed within the
confines of a booth, securely planted
upon Union grounds. At this carnival of
art an amazing and innovative work
referred to as a "wind sculpture" will
break from tradition by utilizing the
atmosphere as its pedestal.
The 16' by 16' modular structure of
red cloth, spruce and complex-box kites
will be found floating, suspended in the
air by guide-wire stretching from the
Union to the LS&A building. Streamers
will emanate from the anchor and
structural lines, and brass foil wind
chimes will hang from the lowest box
kite, creating musical noises, and cat-
ching the light.
Wind sculpture designer, Ann Arbor
artist Catherine Spurr, considers her
unique piece a repetition of units,
placed together to form one complete
whole. Designed as a whimsical symbol
of a festive gathering, she finds the
visual experience of the banners, colors
and cloth flying in the air, an uplifting
and appealing sensation. Most will
agree the grandiose flow of color with
its musical charm is aesthetically
pleasing, and definitely worth ex-
periencing.
AMONG THE vibrant colors and ex-
citement, acting as an unofficial
master of ceremonies over this unique
harvest of art will be mime artist Ken
Feit, "fool-in-residence." He will bring
the crowd together with his mime
routines requiring direct audience in-
volvement.
Also, the fair will even extend indoors
for an ,open house within the Union
sponsored jointly by the Pendleton Arts
Information Center, the Union Gallery,
and the Collaborative. Various UAC
divisions will be represented, with staff
members -available to answer
questions. The first floor Union Gallery
will also be open, presenting the final
two days of "Directions in Fiber."
Fairs that encompass such a wide
scope of the art world, offering
something for everyone, aren't that
unusual. But an event like the Fall Art
Fair, which promises to offer
something for everyone while
remaining high in quality and small in
size, is quite extraordinary. An in-
timate affair like this should not be
missed.

'i [l ii .i l
DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES -- Adults $1 .25
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. til i1:36 P.M. SUN. & HOLS. 12 Noon til 1:30 P.
EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.0 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25
TICKET SALES
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes
prior to showtipne.
2. No tickets sold later than 15 minutes
after showtime.

Pictured is one of the "wind-sculptures" that will be on display at the Union
during the Fall Art Fair.
JOHN BOORMAN'S 1974
ZARDOZ
SEAN CONNERY stars (as sexily as ever) as a future day Alice whose night-
mare Wonderland turns topsy turvy when he crosses over into the forbidden
land of the Vortex. After directing the ultimate man-against-man-against
nature film (Deliverance) Boorman produced/directed/wrote this allegorical
vision of the future and chock-filled it with weird surrealistic ideas, dazzling
atmospheric special effects and strange confusing people. But do not fear.
Cannery is on hand to straighten it out in his usual inimitable style. With
CHARLOTTE RAMPLING, SARA KESTELMAN, JOHN ALDERTON.
Plus Short-DOGGONE CATS, a Looney Tunes vintage classic starring
Sylvester.
SAT: Herzog's EVEN DWARFS STARTED SMALL
SUN: D. H. Lawrence's VIRGIN & THE GYPSY
Schedule change-MEMORIES OF UNDERDEVELOPMENT on Tues., Oct. 3
(not Wed., Oct. 4)

It was the Deltas
against the rules... Fri. & Sat. Late Shows
the rules lost!' 11>.> :0 on Sale
r lsFollowing 9:00
NATIeNAL LAM@N,
A JACK ROWNS-CHARLES H. JOFFE PRODUCTiON

10:40
1:00
3:30
6:30
9:00

CINEMA II

TONITE
at7&9

ANGELL-AUD. A
$1.50

pi
MEDIATRICS §
_ Presents §
KENTUCKY FRIED MOVIE §
(John Landis, 1977) Hilarious spoof of the movies and television. "A bright
and funny film. . . the first 'class' contemporary comedy anthology of recent
§ years, designed for the thinking man.. . bawdy good humor, freshness, and
Sirreverence."-Judith Crist, N.Y. POST §
Sept. 29 NAT. SC. AUD. 7, 8:30, 10 §
§ AND
§ I NEVER PROMISED YOU A ROSE GARDEN
(Anthony Page, 1977) Many things make a movie but Kathleen Quinlan's
portrayal of an emotionally disturbed young woman makes this good film
xceptional. With Bibi Anderssonas her psychiatrist.
Sp.30 NAT. SCI. AUD. 7, 8:40, 10:20

eINTERIORS"

rhe Greatest 6-Pack in Town-
The Daily-764-0558

;,

KRISTIN GRIFFITH
MARYBETH HURT
RICHARDJORDAN
DIANE KEATON
E.G. MARSHALL
GERALDINE PAGE
MAUREEN STAPLETON
SAM WATERSTON
Director of Photography GORDON WILLIS
Executive Producer ROBERT GREENHUT
Produced by CHARLES H. JOFFE

4 l

10:30
1:15
3:45
6:45
9:15

THE COLLABORATIVE
fall art and craft classes
offered in the Michigan Union
Classes and workshops including:
WATERCOLOR, OPEN HOUSE 1-5 p.m.
PAINTING WORKSHOP "iOnrOiVe Room
Register Now-Classes start Oct. 2
U-M Artists & Craftsmen Guild, 763-4430
2nd Floor, Michigan Union

I

I

Written and Directed by WOODY ALLEN

1

"A WONDERFUL FILM." -Rex Reed
Franco Brusati's
0 o ri , --

I

The Ann Arbor Film COOrstive ,presents at MLB 3
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29
(John Avilsen, 1976) ROCKY 7 $9:1--MLB 3
SYLVESTER STALLONE, scriptwriter and star, is rocky Balboa; a battered South
Philly pug who gets a shot at the heavyweight championship. One of the most
popular films in recent years, winner of the Academy Award for Best Picture.
With TALIA SHIRE, BURT YOUNG, BURGESS MEREDITH. "It revives the old verities
about the American Dream and dignity, about the regenerative powers of love
and self-respect. . . ROCKY is simply a knockout."-William Gallo.
TOMORROW: James Dean in EAST OF EDEN and REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE
The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative Is looking for new members. Ask for
details at our showings.

10:15
12:30
3:00
7:00
9:30
No
matinees
Sat. & Sun.

I

I-

E

momommm

BRIAN HUTTON'S 1974
TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE
Inspired by pure fact in Wisconsin two years ago, flesh-eating becomes vogue
for four blood-crazed men as they proceed to attack a group of youths travel-
ling through Texas. Buzzing terror abounds as the men go about satisfying
their cannibalistic hunger for their victims. For cultists, Lizzie Borden fans, and
the strong of heart.

4
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I

JEFF
FADDMI1 [RDGF&5
FAWCETT- ~
%ONMEODY
KILLEDED
JUSbAND

10:20
1:00
3:15
7:15
9:45

SAT: CARRIE

I

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH AUD.
7:00 & 9:05 $1.50

""""

Daily Phone Numbers:
Billing-764-0550
Circulation-764-0558
Classifieds-764-0557
n;cnIn 7__AA-n &A

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