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September 29, 1978 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-29

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 29, 1978-Page
Minority services open their doors

(Continued from Page 1)
cultures. -
Organized last year, a major part of
MSS activity involves student coun-
seling and referral. But MSS also
makes significant recommendations
and reports to University ad-
ministrators concerning the enrollment
of minority students.
"MINORITY ENROLLMENT is
definitely a problem, especially for
Native Americans," said Dorothy
Goeman, MSS' Native American
Representative. "Compared with other
universities, including Michigan State
University, the University of Michigan
is below the average quota for Native
Americans."
This year the University is planning
to actively recruit out-of-state students
for the first time in its history, and
Goeman said that this change may aid
in increasing Native American
enrollment. She explained that up until
now, this failure to recruit out-of-state
minority students, coupled with what
she said are insufficient amounts of
financial aid granted them has resulted
in the low enrollment of Native
Americans.
"Most Native Americans come from
an extremely poor economic
background," she stated, "and they can
not afford high-priced universities."
"THE COST OF this University for
an out-of-state student is outrageous,"
said Cornell Williams, a junior in the
literary college, "and things are getting
worse. They're phasing out minority
programs and classes-something
drastic has to happen to change
things."
Many of the minority students at the
open house agreed. "It seems the
primary goal of the University is sim-
ply to maintain the athletic program,,
and to keep the minority quota at a
minimum," said Randy Potts, a
representative from Trotter House.
One student disagreed. Kathy Dien,
Vice-President of the Chinese Student
Association (CSA) and a graduate
Chemistry student, said that she

doesn't see minority enrollment as a
major problem. "It may be a problem
on the undergraduate level, but it's not
one of our (CSA) major goals in the
graduate school," she explained. "If a
person's got the right qualifications he
should be able to get into the school,
regardless of race."
University President Robben
Fleming-who left after five minutes,
before the entertainment activities
began-said although minority
enrollment is a major problem, the
University is deeply involved in many

service areas.
"Just looking around here you ca
see that there are a great number of di
ferent groups involved who serv
minority interests," Fleming observ
"Of course no one is completel
satisfied with our progress in tha
(minority enrollment) area, but man
groups are sincere in their efforts.
"Our biggest problem is not in gettin"
the minority students to apply, it is i
retaining them," he added. "In thi
respect, Minority Student Services ca
be of great assistance."

. .
A P9*-3 SPECIAL AT TRACTION

Doily Photo by WAYNE CABLE
PASSERSBY ON E. WILLIAM might have been surprised to see signs of life outside the old Delta Kappa Epsilon
fraternity house yesterday. The house, built in 1878, once served as home to such notables as former President Gerald
Ford.9

Gerald For4
By WILLIAM THOMPSON
There's a special sense of history about the revived
Delta Kappa Epsilon (DKE) fraternity on East William
St. just off State. And its promoters are quick to expolit
the "Deke Shant's" claim to campus fame.
"President Ford is a very active Deke alumnus and he
returned to the Shant in 1976," said Kevin Cueno from
DKE's international headquarters. "We're promoting the
staircase in the Shant as 'the steps that Jerry Ford fell
down'."
THE UNKNOWING pedestrians on East William the
venerable brick structure could be anything from palace
to dungeon. That mystery is being cleared up, however, as
DKE kicks off its drive to reactivate their Michigan chap-
ter after nine years.
Cuneo and Dough Lanphe from the fraternity's inter-
national organization are in Ann Arbor this week trying to
get University students acquainted with the Shant and the
fraternity.,
Although the Shant does not serve as a fraternity house,
it has been Delta Kappa Epsilon's meeting place on cam-
pus since 1878.
"THIS BUILDING IS being used in the effort to reac-

Islept here
tivate Deke here at Michigan," explained Cuneo. "Since
1969, when DKE discontinued its chapter in Ann Arbor,
the Shant has been used by alumni for parties after foot-
ball games.
This week the Shant is being used for parties for
prospective pledges, and tomorrow the Shant will be
toasted at its 100th birthday party.
"The Shant is the oldest building in Ann Arbor,"
claimed Cuneo. "It was designed by William Jenny, a
Michigan architecture student who was a Deke."
FROM 1878 TO 1972, the Shant was used for secret DKE
rituals, Cuneo continued, "and no non-Dekes were allowed
in the building. Once, when the plumbing broke down,
.they had to bring a Deke plumber from Ohio, because they
couldn't find one in this area."
Now, however, visitors are welcome in the Shant. DKE
is sponsoring an early pledge process as part of their ef-
fort to reactivate the chapter.
Detailed housing .plans for the fall of 1979 remain
indefinite. DKE alumni are attempting to finalize
arrangements which would permit new members to ob-
tain housing as a group in a rooming house until a per-
manent fraternity house can be purchased.

in
The Qther Half
by Elinor Jones directed by Amy Saltz
The words of the world's greatest female writers come to life in this new
play with music by KATHRIN KING SEGAL. Using journals, speeches,
letters, poems, and songs, the play illuminates the lives of over twenty
women writers, from 600 B.C. to the presbnt and including the works of
VIRGINIA WOOLF, JANE AUSTEN, MARY SHELLEY, EDNA ST. -VINCENT
MILLAY, the BRONTE SISTERS, JOAN DIDION, and LILLIAN HELLMAN.
It is a tribute to the spirit, dedication, and creativity at all womanhood.
Sp.m. Tuesday, October 3
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE
Tickets Available at the PT P Ticket Office
Michigan League, 764-0450
and dIso at the door.

U

S. Africa
elects Botha
Srnew prime
minister
(continued from Page 1)
racial discrimination, the new prime
minister said only: "I intend carrying
out the policies of my party with all its
consequences."
In his speech, Botha told a nationwide
radio audience: "There is a total on-
slaught against the free world and it is
also directed at our fatherland. But to
the power of Marxism and revolution
we will never bend our knees. Everyone
who wants to uphold our freedom must
work hard for this so that we can keep
our unity in South Africa and our place
in the free world."
The government and the economy of
South Africa are controlled by 4.3
million whites,' about three-fifths of
them Afrikaners--descendants of the
Dutch and French Huguenot colonists
who settled the country beginning in the
1600's. There are also 2.4 million
coloreds, or persons of mixed race,
765,000 Asians and 19 million blacks.
A BLACK MAID, asked by her em-
ployer what she though of the election
of Botha as the country's eighth prime
minister since 1910, merely shrugged
and said: "So what. He's still white."
The remark was typical of non-white
reaction to Botha's selection by an all-
white electorate.
Botha's two unsuccessful opponents
for the post were Cornelius Petrus
"Connie" Mulder, 53, minister of plural
relations, and Foreign Minister Roelof
Fredeick "Pik" Botha, 46, no relation.
BOTHA'S MOST crucial test as prime
minister will be the controversy over
the territory of South-West Africa, also
known as Namibia.
When Vorster-who is expected to be
elected to the cermonial job as
president today-announced his
resignation Sept. 20, he also declared
that South Africa was spurning the
United Nations and going ahead with its
own plans for granting independence to
the territory it has administered since
1920. South Africa wants the mineral-

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4tie Arbor 66f 8

WOtVERINE PARTY
an'DELISHOPPE
"LARGEST SELECTION
OF IMPORTED BEER
IN ANN ARBOR"
Fe o FANTASTIC
WINE SPECIALS
LIQUOR * SANDWICHES

600 S. Main 668-8505
9-11 Daily; 11-9 Sunday

PREMIERE EDITION (1978-79 season)
The University of Michigan School of Music
presents the.
Symphony Bend and Wind Ensemble
IN CONCERT
H Robed Reynolds, conducting
8:00 p.m. HILL AUDITORIUM
SEPTEMBER 29, 1978 Admission Complimentary
-..----------- ----------
If you would like more information about upcoming concerts,
complete this form, clip, and mail to:
BAND OFFICE (Attn: Mailings)
U. of M. School of Music
Ann Arbor, M1 48109
NAME
STREET, APT. NO.
CITY, STATE
ZIP
The University of Michigan Professional Theatre Program
p tp
TICKETS ON SALE MONDAY, OCT. 2, 10 A.-M.
for
SALLY ANN HOWES
EARL WRIGHTSON & LOIS HUNT
In
SOIJNOFMUSIC
MusIC BY RICHARD RODGERS
LYRICS BY OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN II
BOOK BY HOWARD LINDSAY AND RUSSEL CROUSE.
SUGGESTED BY

The University
of
Michigan

Professional
Theatre
Program

Guest
Artist
Series

1978
1979
Season

WILLIAM
LEACH in
SHE STOOPS
TO CONQUER
OLIVER Directed by
GOLDSMITH's Andrew Mendelson
delightful 18th Wed. - Sun.
Century romp, Oct. 18 - 22
subtitled "The
Mistakes of a
Night," offers an
uproarious
comedy of errors.
Bumbling
bumpkins, fatuous
fops and
languishing ladies
join forces to
make this
marvelous
entertainment set
against 18th
Century manners
and elegance.
FREDERICK
COFFIN in
THE INSPECTOR
GENERAL

CHRISTOPHER
WALKEN as
RICHARD
THE SECOND

in the Power Center

.,

WILLIAM
SHAKESPEARE's
masterful
chronicle relates
the fall of King
Richard II who
was defeated by
weaknesses in his
own nature, but
ennobled by
suffering. More
poet than lord of
the realm, Richard
proves no match
to the strength of
Bolingbroke, his
cold, calculating
usurper.

Directed by
Richard Burgwin
Wed. - Sun.
Nov. 29 - Dec. 3

MEL
WINKLER in
THE RIVER
NIGER

N IKOLAI
GOGOL's satire
describes
deliciously the
comical events of
a Russian village
which mistakes a
young opportunist
for the
government
inspector and
proceeds to offer
him bribes -
including the
mayor's daughter

Directed by
James Martin
Wed. - Sun.
Feb. 14 - 18

JOSEPH A.
WALKER's
award-winning
and gripping
drama describes
passionately the
struggle of a
Harlem patriarch,
housepainter and
sometime poet as
he strives to make
a place in history
for himself, his
family and his
people.

Directed by
Rhonnie Washington
Wed. - Sun.
Apr. 11-15

.

1

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