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September 26, 1978 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INSTANT'
CASH!
WE'RE PAYING
$1 -$2 PER DISC
FOR YOUR ALBUMS
IN GOOD SHAPE.
RECORDS
OPEN MON.-SAT. 10-6
209 S. STATE
769-7075

Page 12-Tuesday, September 26, 1978-The Michigan Daily
'Umbrella Man'denies

U

Air crash worst in U.

signalling.
WASHINGTON (AP) - The "um-
brella man," who figures in conspiracy
theories about John Kennedy's
assassination, testified yesterday that,
he was at the scene in Dallas to heckle
the President, not to signal a second
assassin.
Louie Witt, a Dallas life insurance
salesman, told the House
assassinations committee that he had
nothing against Kennedy but did not
like liberal politics and had heard that-
an open umbrella symbolizing former
British Prime Minister Neville Cham-
berlain, accused of appeasing Nazi
Germany, "was sort of a sore spot with
the Kennedys."
THE AMATEUR film taken by
Abraham Zapruder shows an umbrella
rapidly twisting up and down as Ken-
nedy was shot Nov. 22, 1963. Conspiracy
theorists have speculated that the man
holding the umbrella was either
signaling a second assassin to fire or
was signaling that Kennedy had
already been hit.
The committee displayed a. page

[FK killer
from a conspiracy book showing
diagrams of an umbrella loaded with a
rocket launcher, dart gun and handgun.
Witt was asked of the wrinkled old
black umbrella lying on the witness
table beside him had once concealed a
rocket launcher or a dart gun in it,
"NO SIR," he replied.
"Did it have a gun or any other
weapon in it?" he was asked.
"This umbrella," Witt said, glancing
at the exhibit next to him. "No, sir."
Witt said he does not remember
vigorously pushing the umbrella up and
down that day in' Dallas, and did not
immediately realize the President was
being shot as he did so.
When he realized that what sounded
like a string of exploding firecrackers
was actually shots at the President, he
said, "I just sat down. I was stunned."
"I think one of my feelings was that
knowing I had been there. heckling the
President ..." he said, staring at the
umbrella. "I was thinking it was like a
practical joke that had gone sour
because I was there with this thing."

(Continued from Page 1)
with 10 miles visibility when the
collision occurred at 12:03 p.m. EST.
The crash, 3,000 feet in the air, occurred
three miles east of downtown Lin-
dbergh Field, the jet's destination.
The flight is commonly taken by state
government officials with business in
Los Angeles or San Diego. Among those
killed in the crash was Valerie Kantor,
wife of Gov. Edmund Brown's unsuc-
cessful 1976 presidential campaign, ac-
cording to a Brown press aide.
Spokesman for at least seven state
agencies gaid they believed employees,
possibly including high officials, were
aboard the flight.
ONE WOMAN MOTORIST was killec
when a falling passenger smashed
through her windshield. "A woman and
a baby were getting into their car,"
said Michael Guss, one of the ambulan-
ce attendants on the scene. "A body
went through the windshield and killed
the woman and child."
Emergency crews sifted through the
smoldering debris, desperately sear-
ching for survivors in the tangled mass
of airplane parts studded with corpses.
But none was found.

Priests roamed streets, halting oc-
casionally to whisper last rites over
bodies tossed from the plane.
ST. AUGUSTINE'S, six blocks from
where most of the debris fell, was con-
verted into a makeshift morgue. The
two planes slammed into each other
while the school-was at recess and the
students scattered.
"Most of the kids saw the actual
crash," said Anthony Wasko, principal
of the school "I sensed it was going to
hit the school, and most of the kids must

3. history (
have, too, because they all started run-
ning from the courtyard,"
Police and firemen cordoned off the
area, but a curious crowd of 4,000 to
5,000 persons jammed in to look at the
grim scene. At least 20 ambulances
lined 33rd Street, the nearest'street to
where the jet tell.
The previous worst U.S. air disaster
occurred in 1960, when 134 persons were
killed in New York City in a crash bet-
ween a United Airlines DC-8 and a TWA
Constellation.

Fitzgerald blasts
Gov. for PBB crisis

(Continued from Page 1)
prevent the kind of mistakes made on
the PBB feed mixup.
"I THINK he should be held accoun-
table for that," the two-term governor
said.
Though the rhetoric got hot and
heavy at times, the candidates hardly

thrifty r
IVUNSEY 3 QUART
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REG. $6.96 '
01' $496
.Men's Dept.

F 'I I

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PRICES GOOD THRU SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1978. MEIJER RESERVES THE RIGHT
TO LIMIT SALES ACCORDING TO SPECIFIED LIMITS. NO SALES TO DEALERS, IN-
STITUTIONS OR DISTRIBUTORS.
( t
1
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Hardware Dept.
Crafts Dept.

1-STOP SHOPPING SAVES MONEY, TIME, ENERGY

raised their voices during a joint news
conference prior to the debate or at the
luncheon itself.
Fitzgerald, who arrived 35 minutes
late for the news conference, appeared
nervous during the 15-minute session
with reporters and perspiration was
visible on his brow and upper lip.
Milliken, who chatted with reporters in
the hall. awaiting the arrival of his
challenger, appeared calm and at ease.
"MY RECORD is one of accomplish-
ment and accountability of leader-
ship," Milliken told reporters.
"My leadership was so aggressive
that some people thought I should not
be the leader there," countered Fit-
zgerald, who was ousted by his
colleagues as Senate majority leader
after two years on the job because of his
heavy-handed leadership techniques.
Milliken charged that Fitzgerald had
been playing "a. bit too fast and loose
with the facts" during the campaign
and tried to present his opponent with a
15-page booklet on the "myths- and
realities" of the race. Fitzgerald would
not accept the offering.
"THE FCT IS, senator, you are
wrong - dead wrong - in some of the
things you are saying about yourself,
about me, and about Michigan,"
Milliken said.
Fitzgerald also accused Milliken of
twisting the facts, especially on PBB.
"What you have said to the people of
this state and in this room is not true,"
he countered.
Milliken devoted much of his time in
the debate to Fitzgerald's voting record
in the Senate, charging that the Detroit
lawmaker has missed 2,837 votes.
"Senator, for eight years, you have
had one of the worst attendance records
in the entire Legislature," the governor
said. "It is rather basic in any line of
work that a person should do one job
well before being promoted to another.
"In any job, you should rather con-
sistently show up for work. Public ser-
vice is no exception."
Fitzgerald argued that as a
legislative leader, "you don't rush to
the floor to try to be the 29th vote on a
28-0 bill you have worked on.
Lynxes, which are found. in the
temperate and subarctic regions of
the Northern Hemisphere, are agile
climbers and spend a good deal of
their time, on the limbs of trees
awaiting their prey when the
weather is agreeable.
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
114 East Washington
The best lunches and dinners
at a very modest price.
HUGE SALAD BAR!
Over 30 items plus
two fresh soups daily1
LUNCHEON 11:30 til 2 p.m.
Va lb. hamburger.......$ .95
All you can eat smorgasbord$2.95
including soup, salad, relish
bar and daily entree
DINNER
Full line menu of Italian and
American food.
ALLYOU CANATSPECIALS
Adults Children
Under 12
SUN. Italian buffet.. $3.95 2.25
MON. Spaghetti.... 2.95 1.75
with meatballs .... 1.00 extra

TUES. Smorgasbord. 3.95 2.25
WED. Seafood buffet 4.25 2.75
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Includes unlimited trips to salad bar,
plus soup and bread.
ENTERTAINMENT
For the whole family
Friday and Saturday
from 6 p.m. on
LIVE BAND

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MEIJER ECONOMY BEEF SALE
II
SAVINGS
sf - -

LARGE
END

OF

$j38
lb.

BURNS APPROXIMATELY 3 HOURS
STERNO LOG'

FULL
CASE
0F6

854 ea.

20 oz. wt. loaf
MEIJER SAVE 95 ON 5
WHITE BREAD?

EPSI LIGHT, DIET OR REG.
PEPSI-COLA

I liter
(33.8 fl. oz.)
returnable bottle
SAVE 20C

25tE

LUS
POSIT

MICHIGAN
BEET SUGAR V 5 lb. bag 794
SAE 79

-~. 1

In 35+
MEIJER COUPON
DEL MONTE
CATSUP
26 o. wt. bottle
Ys

LA WRY 25
MEuiER SUPER *COUPN
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10 count
61/2 0z. wI. box

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10 oz. wt. stick

11

U. Oct m

I f _

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