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September 24, 1978 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-24

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Page 10--Sunday, September 24, 1978-The Michigan Daily
Michigan

Thunder!

(Continued from Page 1)
wide and the Wolverine lead was six, 20-
14., After an exchange of punts Mike
Harden halted Notre Dame progress
with an interception along the sideline
at the Irish 41.
After a line plunge that gained a
yard, Leach drilled a pass into Ralph
Clayton's hands and the junior
wingback ran two yards into the end
zone, where he received a golden dome
in his midsection from Irish cornerback
Dave Waymer. Appropriately, this,
perhaps the finest Irish hit of the day,
came after a Michigan six-pointer.
THE WOLVERINES tried for two but
Leach was sacked attempting to pass
and the lead was 12, 26-14.
The Wolverine defense, often
criticized for its performance on real
grass, then really started to put the
Irish on the green.
Mike Jolly, who blocked a punt in the
first half, punished Notre Dame split
end Kris Haines into fumbling after a
reception, and Michigan's Gerald
Diggs recovered. %
Michigan closed the scoring in a way
symbolic of the day's events, when

v.ol

Defense 's thefts
key Irish defeat

Greer sacked Montana in the end zone
for a two-point safety.
"I think we were in better shape,"
said Jolly, which may have accounted
for Notre Dame's poor second half
showing.
"We just broke down in the second-
half," said Irish coach Dan Devine.
"Offensively they came up with the big
play when they needed it."
Michigan's first offensive play of the
game was big, but not something it
needed. After Huckleby had returned
the opening kick to the Wolverine 17,
Russell Davis almost took a handoff
from Leach. "I never felt the ball,"
Davis said of his fumble. "I never
thought I had it and went to block."

Notre Dame recovered and spent less
than two minutes moving into the end
zone. Montana hit tight end Dennis
Grindinger for the score.,
Late in the first quarter Notre Dame
moved deep into Michigan territory but
the drive stalled and Jolly blocked the
attempted 32-yard field goal.
MICHIGAN got good field position in
the second quarter and moved 49 yards
to tie the game at seven, with Leach
scoring the touchdown on a four-yard
run and Willner adding the point.
Notre Dame's next possession was its
finest of the day as it mixed runs and
passes on a 75-yard march that ended
when Ferguson slammed into the end
zone from four yards out. The half en-
ded with Notre Dame holding a 14-7
edge that could have been worse from a
Michigan perspective.
Huckleby got going in the second half,
running for 67 of his game high 107 yar-
ds, even though he sat out much of the
final quarter. "I just got a few more

openings in the second half," Huckleby
explained, "and we ran a few more op-
tions."
Davis added 41 yards on 14 carries,
and spoke of his opening fumble
saying: "It made us extra cautious, a
blessing in disguise."
It became evident that the Irish were
not the same team that won the Na-
tional Championship last season, as for
the first time since 1963, they lost con-
secutive home games, ending that sea-
son 2-7.
The Irish, who host Purdue next
week, have never started a season with
three losses.
For Michigan, the Duke contest in
Ann Arbor next week will have to be a
letdown. Getting the team to make an
emotional commitment to next Satur-
day will be the coaching staff's biggest
problem.
The win was only Michigan's second
on natural turf in three-plus years, the
other coming at Purdue last season.
Leach said he might have been rusty
in the first half because of missing
practice early in the week, but his
teammates were quick to praise his
performance.
"Leach bailed us out last week," said
Huckleby, "and he bailed us out again
today."
"We had to get to work to help the
Kid," said guard, John Arbeznik, "be-
cause without the Kid, we're nothing."

Daily Photo by MAUREEN O'MALLEY
MICHIGAN'S RICK LEACH AND RUSSELL DAVIS attack Notre Dame's flanl
in second half action of yesterday's 28-14 win. The Wolverines were able to grind
out yardage in the third and fourth quarters, setting the stage for Leach's three
TD passes.
Devine misguidance

Schwartz
Illustrated

' . ' t
,i '
C4i ._ . Y
is
t
_ !
t
t-.+rY..

SCORES

Worth dreaming about.. .
... Irish mystique

BIG TEN FOOTBALL
MICHIGAN 28, Notre Dame 14
MSU 49, Syracuse 21
Iowa State 31, Iowa 30
Purdue 24, Ohio U. 0
Indiana 14, Washington 7
Ohio State 27, Minnesota 10
Wisconsin 28, Northwestern 7
NCAA FOOTBALL
Washington State 51, Arizona State 26
Georgia 12, Clemson 0
Yale 21, Brown 0
Penn State 26, SMU 21
Florida State 31, Miami (Fla.) 21
Columbia 21, Harvard 19
Georgia Tech 27, Tulane 17
Arkansas 19, Oklahoma State 7
Oklahoma 66, Rice 7

MICHIGAN NOTRE DAME

Kansas 28, UCLA 24
Missouri45, Mississippi 14
Southern Cal 24, Alabama 14
Duke 16, South Carolina 12
Kentucky 25, Baylor 21
Maryland 21,North Carolina 20
Texas A&M 37, Boston College 2
Eastern Michigan 27, Indiana State 8
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Boston 3, Toronto I
Cleveland 10, New York Yankees 1
Philadephia 1s6, New York Mets 0-3
Montreal 3, Pittsburgh 2
Los Angeles 5, San Diego 3
San Francisco 3, Houston2,
St. Louis 5, Chicago Cubs 1
Milwaukee 13, Oakland 4
Chicago White Sox 5, California 4
DETROIT 4, Baltimore 3
Atlanta 8, Cincinnati

First Downs.........
Rushing...........
Passing..........
Penalty...........
Rushing/Attempts .....
Yards Rushing...
Yards Lost Rushing ...
Net Yards Rushing ..
Net Yards Passing .....
Passes Attempted ...
Passes Completed ...
Had Intercepted ....
Total Offensive Plays..
Total Net Yards .......
Fumbles: No.-Lost....
Penalties: No.-Yds.....
Interceptions: No.-Yds.
No. of Punts-Yds.......
Average Per Punt ...

18
12
5
2
57
211
26
185
110
20
8
0
77
295
2-1
3-18
2-16
9-362
40.2

18
9
8
1
45
167
24
143
192
29
16
2
74
325
5!3
8-80
0-0
5-179
35.8

Passing Att. Com. Int. Yds. TI
Leach................20 8 0 110
Pass Receiving No. Yds. TI
Davis......................... 2 1 t
Clayton......................2 60
Marsh.......................4 49
Totals ........................ 8 110
Punting No. Yds. Avg,
Willner ............ ........... 9 362 40.2
NOTRE DAME
Rushing Att. Gain Lost Net TI
Heavens ............... 16 75 0 75
Ferguson .............. 23 ,75 3 72
Courey ............... 2 8- 15 -7
Montana .............. 4 9 6 0
Totals................. 45 167 24 143
Passing Att. Com. .Int. Yds. TI
Montana ..............:29 16 2 192 :

By CUB SCHWARTZ

GOD'S COUNTRY

MICHIGAN
Rushing Att. Gain
Huckleby.............22 107
R. Davis............... 14 41
Leach ................. 9 31
Clayton...............3 2
Reid .................. 5 17
Smith ................. 4 13
Totals ................. 57 211

Lost
11
2
10
3
0
0
26

Net
96
39
21
-1
17
13
185

TD
0
0
1
0
0
0
1

Pass Receiving
Grindinger...................
Ferguson ........................
Vehr ............................
M asztak .............. .........
Heavens ................... ..
Condeni.........................
Haines ..........................
M itchell .......................
Stone ............................
Punting
Restic .....................,.....

No.
2
3
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
No.
5

Yds.
23
16
23
23
16
25
39
11
16
Yds.
179

IT'S SOMETHING you dream of in one way. And on the other hand it's
something you fear.
If you're a Catholic boy from a small midwestern town you grow up
living and breathing Notre Dame. You idolize Nick Eddy and you figure
Terry Hanratty and,Jim Seymour is the best pass combination that ever trod
the earth.
Then you grow up, pack your bags and head to Ann Arbor to get an
education. On Autumn Saturday's you mingle with some 100,000 Wolverine
fans. You watch Gordon Bell, Jim Smith and Rob Lytle.
Pretty soon you're a Michigan fan. But deep down insile.. .
So what happens on September 23, 1978?
It's strange. As I slid into my seat and looked down onto the field the first
'Notre Dame-footballlain't-what-you-think-it-is-kid' shock hit - me. There
were hundreds of green and gold jerseys milling about the north end of the
field.
And at the opposite end, only a small band of Wolverines. Wasn't ND
supposed to be the small, outnumbered, but spiritual team? Just the opposite
appeared to be true. After all, who were the Lions and who were the
Christians?
Kickoff, a quick touchdown after an opening fumble, and Michigan
again prepares to receive the ball-7 points down. But on the kickoff a 15
yard personal foul against the green and gold. Three plays later, another 15
yard penalty-again a personal foul.
Yet another penalty just three plays later. Sure, they call them the
Fighting Irish, but they don't cheat, do they? After all, personal fouls are
serious business. It's kind of a nice word for dirty plays and cheap shots.
HALF TIME: It's 14-7, ND's lead and everybody in the press box is hap-
py. They're all ND fans, but there is something sickening about the at-
mosphere. 'Montana makes Leach look bush,' 'They don't really think this
Simpkins is a good linebacker, do they?' 'For having the best backfield in the
nation, they sure don't look so hot.'
Partisan writers
That just about did it. The bubble had burst. Rockne said "hit 'em hard
and if they get up-hit 'em again." He didn't say "hit 'em when they're
down."
SECOND HALF: Rick Leach throws six times, completes five of them
for 89 yards. Three times he finds his man in the end zone. Harlan Huckleby
runs wild. Meter intercepts, Harden intercepts, Diggs recovers a fumble.
More complaining from press row. "Jesus Christ," "Goddamit," "I'm
sorry Doc. This isn't the Notre Dame I grew up with."
FINAL SCORE: Michigan 28, Notre Dame 14.
I headed down into the tunnel to hear Bo's post game comments, in-
wardly pleased. What the hell. I thought, if these sportwriters can scream
and shout for good ole ND, I can at least be happy that Michigan kicked those
"We beat a great team today. All I know is that we beat Notre Dame,"
Schembechler said, "and any time you do that it's something."
I felt like protesting. Then Russell Davis said, "It feels great. It feels
great. Beating Notre Dame is something you dream of as a kid. If you don't
go to Notre Dame and play, you've got to go there and beat 'em."
I. knew that Davis had the same conception of Notre Dame as I had
before the contest. But I had lost it, while he had hung on. And he played on
the field, while I sat upstairs and watched. Maybe I had made a mistake.
Maybe ND football was all that I was taught. Maybe I just got in with the
wrong crowd.
THE NOTRE DAME LOCKER ROOM: Dan Devine is speaking quietly
to a group of four or five reporters. "Michigan is a great football team and
they have a great tradition," he said. "I just knew they were going to come
storming back."
Class all the way
No sour grapes? No excuses? "Michigan forced the turnovers and they
were opportunistic enough to capitalize on them," he continued. "That's the
sign of a good football team."
But what about the personal fouls, the cheap shots, the foul play? "I
don't know. I saw the first one. I was just sick about it," came the response.
"I have gone years without three in a whole season."
"We just don't teach that kind of football here."
BOB GOLIC'S LOCKER: The senior linebacker had just broken the
Notre Dame record for tackles in a single game. He is only four shy of the
career mark. He was individually outstanding. I stood waiting to hear the
singular pronouns.
Instead-"Naturally it's hard to accept a loss. But we know we are
capable of playing well and this will help us. Two losses is enough for an en-
tire season." There were tears in Golic's eyes and a tremble in his voice.
Tt ri n e anhna1 h,4 that'-. the king ofnVflL1 NInvi. Damp k*

Avg
35.

DIRECTS ORDERLY CHAOS:

Bo's be lol
By ERNIE DUNBAR
Special to The Daily
SOUTH BEND, Ind. - For the spectators in the
stands and the Michigan faithful watching the game
on their television sets, the Wolverines' 28-14 victory
over Notre Dame probably seemed like a well-
coordinated effort.
And well it should have as the offensive line
performed their blocking assignments with
precision and the defense held the Irish in check in
the second half after allowing 14 points in the first.
BUT WHAT YOU see on the field is the product of
sideline coaching, instruction, and inspirational pep
talks which result in a mass of confusion to the
layman who doesn't understand the jargon.
Still, it's interesting to watch Bo Schembechler
along the sidelines during a game and see how much
effort he and his coaching staff actually put into
winning football games.,
Following Michigan's second offensive
possession, offensive interior line coach Paul
Schudel corralled center Steve Nauta, guard Greg
Bartnick and tackle Rock Lindsay to explain what
each was doing wrong. The scene was the first of
many throughout the game, as Schudel constantly
kept after his players,. trying to get the best
performances possible.
Schudel sent his troops out for the third
possession, but the offense sputtered once again as.
tailback Harlan Huckleby fumbled for a nine-yard
loss, forcing Michigan to punt after failing to make
up the necessary yardage.
"WHAT HAPPENED on that play?"
Schembechler shouted to Leach as the Wolverine
quarterback trotted off the field.

wi ngbrings
Seemingly disturbed with his team's play, Bo
turned away from Leach and centers his attention
on the Notre Dame offensive series which
originated on the Michigan 46-yard line. He
nervously ran both hands through his thin hair,
holding his ever present baseball cap in his right
hand. He then positioned the cap back on his head
and gave it a violent tug.
It was one of the few times during the whole game
Bo showed any sign of emotion as he remained
remarkably calm throughout the ups and downs of
the contest. His only violent outburst came at the
11:55 mark of the second half when defensive back
Mike Jolly drew a pass interference penalty
resulting in a Notre Dame gain of nine yards.
"No, how could you call that," Schembechler
screamed at the official, walking slowing in the
direction of the striped shirt. His disgust lasted only
a few seconds, however, as he turned to his bench to
set up the ensuing defensive play.
WHILE MUCH of the talk on the Michigan bench
was aimed at correcting mistakes which occurred
on previous plays, several times Wolverine coaches
tried to anticipate the Notre Dame offense by
yelling instructions to Michigan players.
"Watch 86, watch 86," defensive backfield coach-
Jack Harbaugh yelled to his players when Notre
Dame had the ball second and seven on the
Michigan 33 four plays after the Huckleby fumble.
Harbaugh diagnosed the play correctly as Notre
Dame's tight end Dean Masztak hauled in a Joe
Montana pass for 15 yards and an Irish first down.
Shortly thereafter, the sideline instructions
proved fruitful. With Notre Dame leading 7-0 in the
second quarter, Michigan had moved the ball down
to the Irish 36 after taking a punt on the 49-yard line.

Blue bac
"Keep digging 68, keep digging. Play 'em toug
injured tackle Bill Dufek said to Jon Giesler
Dufek limped along the sideline, victim of a broke,
bone in his left foot suffered last week against
Illinois.
Giesler must have heard the man he replaced, as
he threw a block on the Notre Dame defensive
tackle, allowing Huckleby to scamper 11-yards t
help set up Michigan's first touchdown.
WHILE MICHIGAN fought from behind in the
first half, it was understandable that the
atmosphere along the bench would be tension-filled
rather than relaxed. Yet even when the Wolverines
took the lead for the first time with 14:55 left in the
fourth quarter, the coaching staff didn't let their,
emotions overcome them for one minute.
Following Rick Leach's touchdown pass to tight
end Doug Marsh, Bo clapped his hands a few times,
shook hands with Leach and immediately turned to
backup quarterback B. J. Dickey to give the
placekick holder his instructions.
The scene was typical of Bo's reaction to a
successful Michigan play. He constantly squinted as
he watched his squad give Notre Dame their second
successive home loss, something no other team has
been able to do in many years. He never let himself
get carried away with the game, constantly turning
to a coach or player to offer instructions, rather
than letting go with a big smile.
His constant shuffling of players and verbal
orders looked like a confusing mess to those
standing next to the Michigan players, but in the
end, Bo managed to get all the pieces in the right
places to even his coaching dual with Dan Devine at
one win apiece.

BOOKSTORE VISIT FAVORITE RITUAL

Tradition. marks Irish grid game

By RICK MAIUDOCK
Special to The Daily
SOUTH BEND, Ind. - Football
Saturday in South Bend has similar pre-
game festivities and rituals as those in
Ann Arbor, or any other major football
campus. There are plenty of tailgate
parties, and the campus rings with
various Notre Dame fight songs.
Souvenir stands offer all sorts of
novelties with the Fighting Irish
stained on. And yes, those familiar
cries of "Who needs tickets" or "Who
has extras" circulated outside the
stadium's orange brick walls. Prices
for yesterday's contest, according to a
well-travelled scalper were 40 to 50
dollars per ticket, with most buyers
willing to pay 30 to 35 dollars.
Even though the game was televised

the world, has Jesus with his arms
raised, and thus has been appropriately
nicknamed "Touchdown Jesus". The
library is about 250 yards away from
the stadium, but viewed from the field,
appears to tower over the crowds.
Walking toward central campus, the
aroma of barbeque pits permeates the
air. Many different campus and com-
munity organizations sell various char-
coaled items from steak sandwiches to
italian sausage. While a visitor's sense
of smell picks up the aforementioned,
his sense of hearing catches the tunes
from Notre Dame's Marching Band,
which gives a short warm-up perfor-
mance on campus.
But the most popular pre-game ritual

however, there are no books to be found
- just Notre Dame imprints on all sorts
of novelties.
And believe it or not, this famous
business has been managed by a native
Irishman for over 30 years. His name is
Brother Conan Moran, and he lived in
Northwest Ireland for his first 20 years.
"We had experts lay out the store,"
Conan said. "I'd estimate about 25,000
to 30,000 come through the store on fot-
ball Saturday. But about one-half to
two-thirds won't buy anything.
"When one person in a family shops,
they all come along. About one-fourth
(of a family) go through the check-out
line."

catalogue and the student newspaper,"
Conan said.
"We mail out 50,000 catalogues (to
alumni and returning students), and
that covers a wide spread - every state
in the country."
WOLVERINE TALES: One of th
most interesting sidelights inside th
stadium came just before the game
when most of the student section flowe
from the stands onto the field forming
human tunnel. The cheerleaders led th
Irish players through the tunnel, singl
file for about 45 yards.
That student section never sat down
during the game, even towards the
end ... No one can accuse the Irish of

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