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September 24, 1978 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-24

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, September 24, 1978-Page 5

-

U.S. CONDEMNS STRIFE:

Congress backs Somoza

WASHINGTON (UPI)-A bipartisan
group of 78 members of Congress,
mostly conservatives, asked President
Carter yesterday to show his support
for Nicaragua's embattled President
Anastasio Somoza to avoid making that
country a "new Cuba."
Meanwhile, the United States and 15
other nations yesterday supported a
Mexican proposal censuring reported
"excesses" committed in Nicaragua,
but the proposal was rejected by the
Organization of American States

(OAS) by one vote.
THE CONGRESS members, in-
cluding House Democratic Leader Jim
Wright (D-Texas), said "irrefutable
evidence" shows that the current
violence in Nicaragua is carried out by
a group "whose leaders have been
trained in Havana and Moscow and
whose goal is to make Nicaragua the
new Cuba of the Western Hemisphere."
The request was made in a one-page
letter dated Friday and distributed at
the OAS yesterday.

"We urge you to do your utmost to
demonstrate the support of the U.S.
government for the government of
Nicaragua and President Somoza, a
long and consistent ally of the United
States."
IT ADDED, "We ask you to take im-
mediate steps to correct the misguided
application of your policies by the State
Department, particularly regarding
unsubstantiated and erroneous
allegations against the government of
Nicaragua."
Some seven per cent of all babies in
the United States are born with birth
defects, according to the March of
Dimes, a voluntary agency that sup-
ports nationwide iesearch programs
into the prevention of birth defects.

Spy opponents

Daily PhOTO Dy JOMN KNUX
Allan Smith, currently a University law professor, will assume the duties of
interim president Jan. 1.
Smith planning no
big changes for 'U'

(Continued from Page 1)
desk, and if there's nobody there to par-
ticipate at that level and torhelp get
things to the Regents .. then you
reach a point of stagnation. "
Smith said he feels he can avoid such
stagnation because "I know enough
about the institution that I don't have to
sit and postpone everything."
On the other hand, Smith said he
doesn't want "to tie the hands of the in-
coming president" by initiating long-
range programs or studies. Smith said
he will have little or nothing to do with
the selection process of the next
University chief.
SMITH EMPHASIZED that he
regrets the departure of Fleming, who
arrived in the Administration Building
as president two years after Smith
assumed .duties as vice president for
academic affairs. Smith's job as head
of the academic affairs office, presen-
tly filled by Harold Shapiro and before
him by current Cornell President
Frank Rhodes, is generally considered
to be one of the three top positions in the
University, next to the financial affairs
vice president and the president.
Smith, who came to Ann Arbor to
teach law in 1946, was asked what he
considered areas needing improvement
in the University. He said, "I don't even
like to articulate weaknesses" about
the University since "I'm essentially a
positive person." Although "I probably
have some feeling as to which of the 17
schools and colleges are the weakest
and which are the strongest" Smith
said he saw little point in concentrating

on issues to be resolved within the units
themselves.
Smith speculated that with the
possible exception of California's
Berkeley campus, the University is the
finest public university in the country.
"I happen to believe that the polls are
correct identifying (the University) as
one of the leaders among *public
schools," he said.
The president acts as "a window on
the University" for alumni, legislators,
and state residents, whereas the vice
presidents are more concerned with the
detailed workings of programs, Smith
said.
ONE OF THE more important tasks
of the president ,as public relations
director will be his appearances in Lan-
sing when he must make appeals for
state money. He said it is difficult to
convince legislators of the "incremen-
tal nature of education," that is the
necessity -of expansion required by
research.
Just because impressive advances
are made in microbiology "doesn't
mean that we can abandon simple Bot-
any," said the futpre president. Smith
said the University is continually asked
to justify the maintenance of older,
more traditional courses and programs
while expanding research and service
efforts.
Smith had intended to lecture at
Hastings Law School in San Francisco
this spring, but will now forego that trip
and return to the Law School in the fall
of '79. He stressed he wants to return to
the Law School then and earlier in the
week dismissed any 'notion he would
accept the job permanently.

discuss
(Continued from Page 1)
Participants in all workshops con-
sistently brought up the fact that
citizens refuse to take government
spying seriously because they felt it had
no effect on them.
' But Osborn described the magnitude
of the surveillance operations in the
United States as larger than the
average person believes.
"You may not see it until it hits you,
but it's like a disease. . . everybody is
a potential target of this thing and
that's not paranoia," he said.
A member of the college organizing
workshop pinpointed another problem
the campaign faces. "We're in the mid-
dle of a growing conservative political
climate in this country. We have to
begin to build a movement that will
move things back to the way they were
in the 60's, he said. 1
CSBS Chairman and former National
Security Council senior staff member
Morton Halperin cited citizen ignoran-
ce as helpful to the aims of the CIA.
According to Halperin, the CIA has
declared that it is "entitled to keep
secrets from the American public
because if the American public learns
what it is doing it will stop them from
doing it." Halperin called such abuses
the "antithesis" of the values of a
democratic society.
Halperin also expresed optimism at
the fate of the hundreds of lawsuits and
Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)
requests now being filed because of an
Executive Order issued by President,
Carter that goes into effect in Decem-
ber. The order dictates that an official
considering the release of information
must now "balance" the public's right
to know against interests in keeping the
information secret for national security
purposes.
Halperin later spoke at yesterday
evening's plenary session which capped
the day's events.
"We have a right to know what is
being done on our own behalf," he said.
Before about 200 persons in Rackham
Auditorium, State Rep. Perry Bullard
(D-Ann Arbor) and members of black,
Hispanic, and Native American ac-
tivist groups discussed the history of
government surveillance and
harrassment in America.
"Here in Michigan, we have our own
State Police 'Red Squad'," Bullard said.
Red Squads are police intelligence units
which conduct political spying. Bullard
,said the Michigan State Police Red
Squad was deactivated in 1974. The
squads, according to Bullard amassed
files on the political activity of "at least
50,000sindividuals.

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trategy
Bullard called for more stringent
federal and state regulations of private
intelligence units. "The state of
Michigan and the Michigan State Police
should not participate in intelligence
programs like this one which is not sub-
ject to state laws of regulation."
Maria Cueto, a grand jury resistor
who spent ten months in prison for
refusing to testify before a New York
grand jury investigating a Puerto
Rican Independence movement,
described the wide discretion of grand
juries which she said was used tok
harrass individuals.
"We had to spend over ten and one-
half months in jail for a fishing ex-
pedition-what we call a witch hunt,"
she said.
Lou Meyers, a member of' the
National Conference of Black Lawyers,
and American Indian Movement (AIM)
member John Trudell called for a
resurgence of the vocal political ac-
tivity that characterized the opposition
to the Vietnam War in the 1960s.
"All of us in so many ways accept
the legitimacy of wrong. This conferen-
ce must have a purpose other than
discussion and analysis," Meyers said.

FRESHPERSONS ANDS
BE PART
for the first time in Ann Ar
UAC Sop
MASS N
for Cast a
Sun., Sept.
Pendleton Arts In
Michigan Uni
For More Informao
COME AND BRIT

-.

fall1
art
saturIFUJ Sept. 30
10 am to 0 pm
Sunday, oct. 1
12 noon to 6 pm
grounds of the
michigan union
state street at
south uniiversit

THE
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is now open for
B REAKFAST
specializing in
Omelettes
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2250 possible combintions of
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OPEN FOR BREAKFAST: MON.-FRI. 7 a.m.-l1 a.m.
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-I

a

Anti-spying coalition
membership diverse

(Continued from Page 1)
U.S. and covert activities abroad."
.That participants came from New
Mexico, Vermont, Hawaii and Canada
is a testimony to the realization of that
goal.
Most participants echoed the expec-
tations of Native American activist Bob
Cruz, that "the tactics and experiences
of others would help me personally in
my own work."
Ted Glick, of the People's Alliance
pointed out that another key goal of the
conference is to give "more of the
whole picture," since "one is limited in
how much can be done locally without
such national ties. dT
GAY RIGHTS advocate Dan Tsang
said the conference was relevant to his
activites because "gay groups have
been targeted for surveillance since at
least 1970 by the FBI."
Michael Zinzun, representing the
Coalition to End Police Abuse, a
predominately black group based in
Los Angeles, explained that he came
because, "it is important for third
world people to play an active role in
researching the many incidents of
police spying and how to counter it."
What emerges from this often
Open Today

chaotic and highly intense exchange of
ideas, tactics, pamphlets and stories is
a communal sense that a movement is
growing around the issue; a movement
that participants said they hoped would
finally curb, if not end domestic spying.
Oct. 5 thru Dec. 10 11

THE COLLABORATIVE.
fall ,t nd cft classes
offered in the Michigan Union
Classes and workshops including:
HOW ABOUT HATS?
FIBER TECHNIQUES WITH METAL
A TEXTILE MASKS
Register Now-Classes start Oct. 2
U-M Artists & Craftsmen Guild, 763-4430
2nd Floor, Michigan.Union
Sch landerer
on South U
Welcomes you
with a real
noodeler!
Estimate the number of shells at the base of our window display
and win' a bottle of wine and dinner for two at Ypsilanti's
Spaghetti Bender.

F
Mas
hasI

a- \

p 9
Who says
boys don't
play with
dolls?
This is the perfect doll
for any Michigan fan-
young or old.
"ring nearly 2' tall, every detail
ir all-star quarterback.
Murphy's Landing
L: GET A DOZEN
TBALL" Glasses
with this ad
(reg. 50C each)
FI l I O

Use Daily
Classifieds

"Directions in Fiber~
through Oct. 1
Marson Ltd.
Oriental Graohics

'e of heavy felt and meos
been custom sewn into ou
$35.00 only ot A
SPECIAI
16 oz. "FOC

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