100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 22, 1978 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A 1
correction
In yesterday's paper, we carried a United Press International story
which reported that the Eastern Michigan Unversity faculty strike
began on September 13 - the first day of classes. Actually, the first
day of classes at EMU was September 6. The faculty worked until
September 13 without a contract and walked off the job on that date.
Take Ten
In late September, 1968, a report put together by a group of seven
University law students entitled, "The Administration of Justice in the
Wake of the Detroit Riot of July, 1967" was released, indicting
practices in Detroit Recorder's Court during and after the riot. The
panel charged that the rights of defenddnts were violated in case after
case. The 86-page report, which was published in the Michigan Law
Review, listed "assembly line" procedures, high bail and de facto
suspension of the writ of habeus corpus among its complaints about
the courts.
Happenings.. .
.start bright and early today with a dayplong seminar on
"Confidentiality Issues and the Substance Abuse Law" at 8 at Howard
Johnson Motor Lodge. . . quickly followed by a rummage sale at the
Fist Baptist Church at 502 E. Huron starting at 9 ... at noon, the
Action for Soviet Jewry and Human Rights (AKTSIA) is holding an
open meeting in the multi-purpose room of the Undergraduate
Library. . . Army ROTC is giving a demonstration in Rappelling (a
form of mountain-climbing) at the south side of the Dental Building
from 1:30 to 3 ... at 2, the Music School is hosting a workshop with
Mary Lou Williams titled"The Compositons of Duke Ellington," .. .
Bonnie Mills -will speak on "Ten Months at the Institute of Laser a
Engineering, Osaka University" at 3:45 in White Auditorium of the
Cooley Building . . the Yugoslav film Festival presents Beasts at 4 in
Auditorium A of Angell Hall.. .at 5:30 the ROTC is sponsoring an
open house and back-to-school party on the 2nd floor of North
Hall ... Hillel will be holding Orthodox services at, 7, Reformed
services at 8 ... at 7:30 the Astronomical Film Festival kicks off its
year with Voyager: Mission to the Outer Planets, to be followed by a
lecture by Jim Louden entitled "Beyond Jupiter," in Auditorium 3 of
the Modern LAnguages Building. .. and at 8 the University Reformed
Church/Campus Chapel presents a panel, "Christians and
Institutional Power" in the Pendleton Room of the Union.
*i
On the outside.. .
... Prepare for another day of October weather as we have partly
cloudy skies and temperatures in the low to mid 60s.

Vets adjust to

"U" li

By MARION HALBERG -
Ron Loveless is 23, attends the
University of Michigan, and feels
separated from the other students in his
classes.
"Most of the people are only two
years younger than me, but it seems
like a different culture," he said.
Loveless is one of approximately 750
veterans who attend the University
each year through benefits provided by
the GI Bill.
"YOU GO TO the Army," Loveless
said. "You come back, and then you go
off to school. You go away and grow up.
You're taught to survive. You get
culturized. Then you're sitting in a
class and you feel much more worldly
than the other students. Then there's
that feeling - oh, oh, I'm outside again.
I'm not relating."
Dennis Coiling, who works for the
University's Veterans Affairs office in
the LSA Building, says many vets share
Loveless' problem.
"Some try coming back to college on-
ce and get discouraged. A lot of people
don't feel welcome," said Colling.
WHY DO VETERANS bother to try
college after the years they have
missed? The GI Bill is available to any

veteran with a better than dishonorable
discharge who has served at least 181
days of continuous duty between
January 31, 1955 and January 1, 1977.
The bill entitles veterans to 45 months
of full-time benefits, or an equivalent
amount for part-time study. But as
Colling points out: "I think a lot of
people overestimate the amount of
money actually received by the bill."
The veterans receive only a stipend
for study. The amount is based on the
number of dependents they have.
A vet with no dependents gets $311a
month, while one with two dependents
receives $422 a month. (These figures.
are for a full-time study basis.)
FOR MANY attending this Univer-
sity, the money barely pays for tuition.
"I felt misled," Loveless said. "The
GI Bill was the reason for me going to
the army. I really went into the trip of
education.
"But when they recruit," he added,
they tell you everything that you want
to hear, not what you want to know."
Tim Artist, a 28-year-old Vietnam
veteran, shares this feeling. "They
shouldn't hide it under the pretense of,
'Here's money to go to school'. I think

we deserve mor
take away what w
sider the cost ofl
books."
ARTIST SAID h
to adapt to studen
"I've always b
an adaptable pe
different because
I've got 10 years
There's no real
make you 'worldl

The Michigan Daly-Friday, September 22, 1978-Page
fe on GI Bil
e, but I'm not saying "I wouldn't come to a dorm now,"
ve've got. But just con- added. "But, yes, I would have liked
living and the cost of have had the college life, all t
craziness. But now I see it as a bad
he didn't find it as hard my life. I wouldn't like that. I'd d
t life as other vets do. out."
een able to adapt. I'm Veterans eligible for the benef
rson. But I guess it is provided by the GI Bill must take
e of the time involved. vantage of them before the expirati
on most people here. date, which is 10 years after
substitute for time to discharge or December 31, 19
ly'," said Artist. whichever occurs first.

New diet food rules set

WASHINGTON (UPI) - The Food
and Drug Administration today issued
new rules under which foods which
promote themselves as "low calorie"
must contain no more than 40 calories
per serving.
In addition, foods which are billed as
"reduced calories" can use that phrase
only if they have at least one-third
fewer calories than the food to which
nthey are being compared.
"The purpose of this new regulation
is to assure that foods labeled 'low
calorie' or 'reduced calorie' genuinely
represent a caloric savings," FDA
Commissioner Donald Kennedy said.

"Consumers who buy foods intended
for weight control will have a better
understanding of what they are buying
and labels will be more uniform so
consumers can more easily compariso
shop."
All foods introduced into interstate
commerce after July 1 of next year will
have to comply with the rules which
were originally proposed in 1977.
Under the rules, foods which claim
low or reduced calories must carry a
complete nutrition label describing the
calories-per-serving as well as the
vitamin, fat and other content.

AN WL

m:

PROVEN OPPORTUNITY
- BE YOUR OWN BOSS
-WORK YOUR OWN HOURS
WE ARE SEEKING AN EAGER
SELF STARTER TO BECOME OUR
REPRESENTATIVE IN THE CAMPUS AREA.
CALL TOLL FREE FOR DETAILS
1-800-327-3665,
(USTM 'PRINTED ? HI T '+ACTGRY

a, ,

SPE BORSON-Soph.

500 E. Liberty
(just off State)
761-6212

I

.
M:
-
.
'
.
,

.

a

as

Instruments

takes

the

S

LN\LINE

to

L I l

the Commuters that
Compure

25

-Logs T
-ZZ4~

rig, Factorial, y

X Constant

A/lean, Varience, Standard Deviation

Batteryife-1000 hrs. of continuous

use

f--j

r
"

- Automatic

Powier

DoINn

LIST PRICE $32.95

$27,00 CELLKR'S

I

W E TA K A.---- ----------- ----------C A R E ----------- --OF---------Y OU--------
We ar theonly-eopl-In-A tha
c~werlbs ear ~j~W ly7eria
--------------,~- ~ - ~ k.~i

T

1750

- Standard Aath

&

0

- Square

Rciot

-4 Key Mem, Function
Up to 2000 hrs. of
operation - Batt.

I~ 1STRPFICF

Spa 95 1I<

G i

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan