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September 21, 1978 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-21

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 21, 19

f - - -

Yellowjackets' sting

felt in A 2

Lawsuit against F
settled out of cour

By-DAN EZEKIEL
If you've noticed more yellow jackets
buzzing around campus trash cans than
usual, you're not alone. The bee-like in-
sect that hung around your pizza or
coursed through the air of your room
recently is one of a greater-than-usual
horde of wasps in the state this fall, ac-
cording to Thomas Moore, Curator of
nsects at the University's Zoological
Museum.
"Yellow jacket" is actually a collo-
quial name for a number of species
which make paper nests, live in groups,
and display brown and yellow bands.
The dozen-odd species in the state feed'
primarily on other insects.
MOORE explained that although "no
one takes that accurate a census," it
has been a good year for bugs.
A sample of fourteen people around
campus revealed that all had noticed an
unusual number of the wasps. Four had
been stung at least once.
Moore noted that last winter was a
cold one and "it's better for them
(wasps) if it never gets warm during
the winter."
ARE ALL these flying stingers dan-
gerous?
"A stick is dangerous," Moore
laughed, "depending on how you use it.

For most people they're not, but some
people are allergic to their stings. It
could mean death.
"But for the great majority of people,
it's only an irritation. The pain disap-
pears in five or ten minutes, but the

of it in peace."
If you aren't ready for peaceful co-
existence, Moore noted that yellow
jackets can be swatted like flies, "if
you've got the nerve." The tiny
creature is unlikely to sting if it is not

"I can show you five stings. We should live with our
fellow beings, but we should be in control."
-Charles Harris, city Parks and
Recreation employee

poison. "We should live with our fellow
beings, but we should be in control."
Grace Baysinger, a clerk at the
Natural Science library reports that
she was stung while driving her car. "It
was somewhere downtown. I carry a
can of wasp spray with me in the car
now."
FRANK DIAMICO, a University
Italian and French instructor, had
perhaps the most uncomfortable ex-
perience: "I sat on one. It was like an
injection. For five miniutes, I felt like I
was going to die," he laughed.
Moore reported no one really knows
enough about the factors affecting the
survival of insects from season to
season to predict whether next year will
bring another bumper crop of the gaily-
colored marauders.
It could be that a yellow jacket will be
hard to find at this time next year.
Rather than dwell on their temporary
depredations, we should count our.
blessings - Moore noted that the early
spring of this year was a time of
disaster for house flies and their kin:
"It was so moist that thousands of flies
were dying of white fungus infections."

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (UPI)-An out-of-
court settlement was reached yester-
day in a $3 million civil suit charging
Ford Motor Co. with negligence in the
manufacture of the gas tank for the 1973
Maverick automobile.,
The suit was filed in behalf of the
parents of two 17-year-old high school
students who died when the Maverick in
which they were riding was struck from
the rear by another vehicle.
ATTORNEYS FOR the parents of
Wanda Sue Gossett of Germantown and
William Schwerin of Collierville and for
Ford agreed not to discuss terms of the
out-of-court agreement. Sources said,
however, Ford had agreed to pay an
undisclosed amount of money as terms
of the settlement.
Two witnesses testified the Maverick
resembled a "fireball" after it was
struck from the rear and burst into
flames in April 1976.
The two teen-agers were waiting to
make a turn on the highway when the
Maverick was struck by another car

going the maximum spef
miles per hour.
The suit claimed Ford'sc
Maverick gas tank was n(
contributed to the deaths.
Attorneys - for Ford,
claimed the driver of th
struck the Maverick was d
excessive rate of speed and
tank's design and placem
cause the explosion.
Use
Daily'
Classifies

78- Page
orF
"t
ed limit,
design of the:
egligent an
however,.
e car which;
riving at ah"
the gasolin
Went did nat.
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RS
ad

sting may itch for a week."
MOORE ADVISED those who are
allergic to wasp stings to stay inside as
much as possible during this insect
season.
For the rest of us, he counseled
caution and urged an understanding at-
titude toward our fellow creatures:
"Expect them when you go outside with
a sandwich. You might give them a
piece of it - they do not 'recruit' other
individuals to the food source the way
bees do. So if you give them a piece of
meat, they may leave you to eat the rest

molested, but Moore said one is seldom
aware of the sort of day a yellow jacket
has been through before one encounters
it: "He may just have been snapped at
by a dog."
YELLOW JACKETS can sting
several times, unlike honeybees, and
the first two or three stings can be pain-
ful.
"I can show you five stings," said
Charles Harris, a former employee of
the Ann Arbor Parks and Recreation
Department. He believed that the city
should spray the hives of the wasps with

J
OQ'
t
O

Greene on ballot
in bid for Congress

Vorster resigns as

Take a break al
BELL'S
Enjoy our delicious
PIZZA and GRINDE
S. State and Pack
995-0232

(Continued from Page 1)
legally overruled the Attorney
,eneral's opinion. The Councilman
laimed the Canvassers were obligated
',obey Kelley's opinion.
The court ruling will eliminate any
possibility that Pursell will run unop-
)sed.
Greene, appearing pleased for the
irst time in months, said the decision
hows that "justice has prevailed."
"IT'S BEEN A long and hard
truggle, almost a nightmare," said the
nn Arbor Democrat.
Greene, who has persistently charged
he Republicans with intentionally
locking his way to the ballot, said par-
isan politics prevented him from ap-
ring on the primary ticket and
aused last month's State Board of
anvassers' ruling that overruled
elley's opinion.
"It's the nastiest political move the
epublicans could have made," said
rene.
GREENE SAID that partisan politics
f "muddy thinking in Nancy Chase's
Republican chairperson of the board)
ead" influenced the board's ruling.
Chase angrily denied Greene's ac-
'usation, insisting the board has two
emocrats and the unanimous vote
roves that partisan politics was not a
actor.
"He can say whatever he wants but
e ruled the way we did because it sets
a bad precedent for Congressional elec-
;ions in the future," said Chase.
"AND WE HAVE nothing against
Earl Greene," she added.
. Greene- claims Pursell supporters
have attempted to keep him off the
November ballot. But a Pursell aide
said the charges are "completely
false."
"We're delighted to have Greene
back in the campaign. Carl continually
said that he didnt want any part of
Greenc's situation and insisted on
staying out of it," said Bob Webber, an
administrative aide to the Republican
Congressman.
WEBBER SAID Greene has
repeatedly criticized Pursell because
the local Democrat "was caught with
blowing his chance for the ballot and
thought everybody was after him."
During the conference, Greene at-
tacked Pursell's voting inconsistency
and his poor attendance record.
"Pursell is a very nice person but he
has a problem with political
philosophy," he said.
"HE ONLY VOTES where the
pressure is," he added.
.Greene referred to the Republican
incumbent's vote extending the ERA
deadline and his opposition to raising
minimum wage as points of incon-
sistency.
S"I don't know anybody who can get
by on $2.35 an hour," said the Coun-
cilman.
GREENE CRITICIZED Pursell for
attending only 84 sessions out of 123
during the 1977 Congressional term.

Greene said the delay resulting from
his struggle to get on the ballot would
hurt his campaign but said a lot of time
still remains before the November elec-
tion.
"New York just had its primary so I.
think we have a lot of time left," he
said.
He also announced he would debate
Rep. Pursell on October 27 in the
University's Angell Hall.

South African
(Continued from Page 1)
<< -rs..,vantage"
Democratic Turnhalle Alliance, has in- SWAPO. Th
sisted on elections by year's end. SWAPO as-
The black militant South-West Africa of Namibia'
People's Organization, SWAPO, and The Unite
the moderate Namibia National Front West GermE
have supported the U.N. plan, which more than<
would put U.N.-supervised elections off and SWAP
until next year. supervised t
South Africa fears the delay might
give SWAPO time to campaign and
rally support from Namibia's black
majority.
BOTHA SAID A U.N. force of 7,500
would be "an unfair psychologicial ad-

leader
for communist-backed
e United Nations recognizes
the legitimte representative
s 900,000 people.
ed States, Britain, France,
any and Canada worked for
a year to get South Africa'
PO to agree to a U.N.-
transition to independence.

Sun-Wed op4
Thurs
Friday-Satur
FREE DELIVERY daily after 4:30

__..

en til1 am
til 2
day til 3 am

FRESHPERSONS AND SOPHOMORES-
BE PART OF THE EXPERIENCE!
for the first time in Ann Arbor ...
U AC Soph show's
PIPPIN
MASS MEETING
for Cast and Crew
Sun., Sept. 24, 7:30 p.m.
Pendleton Arts Information Center
Michigan Union, 2nd Floor
For More Information Call: 763-1107
COME AND BRING A FRIEND I

in the Power Center

The University
of
Michigan

Professional
Theatre
Program

Guest
Artist
Series

1978
1979
Season

WILLIAM
LEACH in
SHE STOOPS
TO CONQUER
OLIVER Directed by
GOLDSMITH's Andrew Mendelson
delightful 18th Wed. Sun.
Century romp, Oct. 18 - 22
subtitled "The
Mistakes of a
Night," offers an
uproarious
comedy of errors.
Bumbling
bumpkins, fatuous
fops and
languishing ladies
join forces to
make this
marvelous
entertainment set
against 18th
Century manners
and elegance.
FREDERICK
COFFIN in
THE INSPECTOR
GENERAL

CH RISTOPH ER
WALKEN as
RICHARD
THE SECOND

WILLIAM
SHAKESPEARE's
masterful
chronicle relates
the fall of King
Richard II who
was defeated by
weaknesses in his
own nature, but
ennobled by
suffering. More
poet than lord of
the realm, Richard
proves no match
to the strength of
Bolingbroke, his
cold, calculating
usurper.

Directed by
Richard Burgwin
Wed. - Sun.
Nov. 29 - Dec. 3

MEL
WINKLER in
THE RIVER
NIGER

NIKOLAI
GOGOL's satire
describes
deliciously the
comical events of
a Russian village
which mistakes a
young opportunist
for the
government
inspector and
proceeds to offer
him bribes -
including the
mayor's daughter
- before finally

Directed by
James Martin
Wed. - Sun.
Feb. 14 - 18

JOSEPH A.
WALKER's
award-winning
and gripping
drama describes
passionately the
struggle of a
Harlem patriarch,
housepainter and
sometime poet as
he strives to make
a place in history
for himself, his
family and his
people.

Directed by
Rhonnie Washington
Wed. - Sun.
Apr. 11-15

1

I1

SUE BORSON-Soph.

I

i

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