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September 16, 1978 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-16
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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- -- - - r~-- -- -

Page 18-Saturday, September 16, 1978-The Michigan Daily
MANY TALENT-LADEN OFFENSES:

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, Septe
One more time.. .

Big

Ten offers increased passing

Final season for band director Cav

By ALAN FANGER
Some pretty nifty arms will be tossing
the pigskin around the Big Ten Con-
ib IC Udjctgan
Football supplement editors:
Bob Miller, Paul Campbell, Ernie
Dunbar, Henry Engelhardt, Rick
Maddock and Cub Schwartz.

ference this fall. In fact, 1978 could be
the Year of the Pass.
From West Lafayette come signs of
more aerial acrobatics, as Purdue's
Mark Herrmann returns to defend the
conference passing title he claimed as a
freshman last year.
At Michigan State, Coach Darryl
Rogers is counting on a
passing/receiving combination of Ed
Smith and Kirk Gibson to lift the Spar-
tans into contention.
HIGHLY TOUTED freshman Art
Schlichter has arrived at Ohio State
with thoughts of unseating the run-
oriented Rod Gerald, and Coach Woody

Hayes may hold the same opinion come
opening day. It will be mighty difficult
for the silver-haired mentor to turn his
back on Schlichter's impressive 21-
touchdown pass performance as a high
school senior.
Even Michigan Coach Bo Schem-
bechler has hinted that the Wolverines
will be hurling more balls through the
breeze this autumn.
Opposition defenses will be wary of
Herrmann, who connected on 55 per-
cent of his tosses for nearly 2,500 yards
and 18 touchdowns. Boilermaker foes
can only hope that Herrmann fires as
many interceptions (27) as last year.

NEW AT ICHC=MATEI

Otherwise, the Carmel, Indiana,
sophomore may just bask in All-
American glory.
In last season's encounter with
Michigan, State's Smith riddled the'
Wolverine secondary, completing 14 of
23 passes. Although not all his perfor-
mances were as praise-worthy, Smith
covered more than 1,700 yards through
the air and wound up fourth in total of-
fense within the conference.
Smith should better his 1977 slate by
having Kirk Gibson around, if not by
mere self-improvement. Gibson, better
known for his baseball abilities,
averaged over 24 yards a reception last
season, while hauling in six for touch-
downs. His outstanding speedy and
strength will loom as a constant threat
to defensive backfields.
FOR THOSE fanastics of the grind-it-
out-on-the-ground game, all is not lost.
Ohio State tailback Ron Springs will
be back to improve on his sterling 1,166
performance of a' year ago. An All-Big
Ten selection in '77, Springs averaged
nearly six yards per carry and was far
and away the finest back on a talent-
laden squad.
Buckeye helmsman Gerald will com-
plement Springs with some running of
his own as long as he can hold off
Schlichter's challenge for the job. The
agile senior from Dallas chalked up 1654
yards as a junaior, and in his spare
time completed 59 percent of his
passes.
With standouts such as these
predominating the Big Ten this fall, the
offenses should be more potent and the
defenses slightly bluer with frustration.
More stats
INDIVIDUAL DEFENSIVE,

Tops FOR GALS!

TACKLES Solo
SIMPKINS............ 126
METER ............... 70
Anderson .............. 54
GREER..............58
Hicks ..~........48
Pickens ......:........ 48
Howard ............... 39
Tedesco ............... 37
KEITZ............... 27
Graves................ 37
JOLLY................ 32
OWENS ............... 31
HARDEN ............. 30
SEABRON............ 24
GODFREY ............ 22
MELITA..............14
TROGOVAC........... 12
DE SANTIS............ 9
PATEK ............... 10
Bednarek..............9
BELL................. 8
W. JACKSON .......... 6
Richardson ............ 6
BRAMAN ............. 4
WEBER ............... 2
Brown................. 2
HARRIS .............. 2
Harding ............... 2
NICOLAU .............~ 1
MURRAY ............. 0

Ast Total
48 174
34 104
42 96
36 94
28 76
28 76
27 66
29 66
32 59
18 55
14 46
15 46 "
5 35
10 34
7 29
11 25
7 19
7 16
2 12
2 11
2 10
3 9
0 6
1 5
3 5.
1 3
1 3
0 2
1 2
2 2

Yds
20
40
48
10
1
72
6
15
7
5
48
22
13
19
10
11
3

By RICK MADDOCK
The 104,000-plus at Michigan Stadium
will only have one more season to cheer
a friend. A friend who works incredibly
hard, and always has a successful
product to show for his effort.
Professor George Cavender will
retire from leading the Michigan
Marching Band after this season. He
has been the director since 1971, and he
has worked for the University for 28
years.
Cavender will move on to be the
director of Development and School
Relations for the School of Music. The
job entails fund raising for different
projects for the School of Music. He's
already had some experience 4n this
type of work.
"I WAS successful in raising all the
funds for Revelli Hall. I said, 'Well, it's
about time we had a good building for
the-band.' I raised over half a million
dollars," Cavender said..
He also raised seven million dollars
for the School of Music. How did he do
it? "You just have to know the right
people at the right time," he said.
To people around the University,
Cavender is not known as the fund
raiser, but as the band leader, whom
everybody calls George.
"I've always had a marvelous
rapport with the student body, even
during the turbulent sixties. I'll be
walking on campus and students who
I've never taught will say, 'Hi,
George."
His popularity stems from his job, as
people appreciate his dedication. The
man works hard, and he works the band
members hard, yet he does not let his
intensity interfere with his personality.
"I'VE TALKED with my young men
and women about giving 150 per cent.
Few people have been challenged to
give their total utmost. We've talked
about it in drills," Cavender aid.
"It's a nebulous goal, but at the
dress rehearsal for the half-time
Orange Bowl show, my band gave 150
per cent; and they knew they had and I
knew they had. There was nothing I
could do, so I just put'my head down
and cried, just like a baby. It was the
ultimate moment."
Cavender's goal for his band
members is not to benefit the band
directly. Sure,, he wants to have his
band sound perfect, but he's interested
in something far more important.
"Learning to give 150 per cent is not
to produce a good show, but to produce
great people. The show is a by-product
of training people. Other band directors
look at it the other way, all for the
show."
A few years back, Life Magazine did
a story on Bob Johnson, a leading heart
surgeon in Phoenix, Arizona. Johnson
said in the six-page interview that he
learned the intensity that he uses on the
job from his experience in the
Michigan Band.
WHAT KIND OF intensity does it
take to play in the Michigan Band?
Well, first of all there were three-a-day
practices before classes started. They
practiced from 9 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
Then again from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.,
and finally from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
"We don't have a lot of money. Other
schools have band camps, so they
practice gradually. We don't have the
money to have band camps, so we have
to make hay the first few days,"
Cavender said.
The September hot spell has caused

some problems for the practices,
limiting full capacity practices. To
make matters worse, this is the hardest
opening show ever, according to
Cavender, because the following week
they're on national television at Notre
Dame.
"One young man came up to me after
one of the practices and said, 'You
know, Mr. Cavender, I was on the high
school football team and the wrestling
team, and I've never worked this
hard,' " Cavender said.
Now that classes have started, the
band practices for an hour and a half a
day, but they waste no time. The drill
sheet has everything to be done that
day, including the number of minutes
that will be used to practice each listed
item.
THIS YEARS band will have about
260 members, and all of their positions
are- decided upon by their peers. The
vote who will play where, as well as
who the twirlers, drum major,
announcer, and flag carriers will be.
"If a young man or woman is
qualified, then I owe them a place. I
turned 50 to 60 flute players down. We
don't need them, because they don't
add anything. You can't hear them,"
Cavender said. "I don't play a numbers
game. The 250 is not an attempt to
make the biggest band ever."
Cavender was involved with the
biggest band, however. The now-extinct
Band Day created the largest mass

DATE

September 16
September 23
September 30
October 7
October 14
October 21
October 28
November 4
November 11
November 18
November 25

ILLINOIS
at Notre Dame
DUKE
ARIZONA
MICHIGAN STATE
at Wisconsin
MINNESOTA
(Homecoming)
at Iowa
at Northwestern
PURDUE
at Ohio State

band in the world - 15,000 strong. The
feat is listed in the Guinness Book of
World Records.
The record is nothing, though,
compared to the feeling that the band
members perceive when they march
out of that dark tunnel into the

p..-

FEW

THINGS

IN

LIFE BECOME

,,,:.
,
._ . ..,
:
y.- w f

screaming et
"It's an in
thrill up and
tell me it tz
Cavender sa
themselves?
and Blue on I
out. That's th

1 1978 Michigan football s

TEAM

_--.

SHIRTS
" SWEATERS

" BLOUSES
" VELOURS

* BIG TOPS
Tissue fresh and ready just for you.
Come see..*.

I solo each: Cannavino, J. Jackson, O. Johnson,
T. Leoni, Payne, Willner
INTERCEPTIONS No. Yds TD LP
Hicks ....................... 4 55 0 23
JOLLY ..................... 3 79 1 50
Howard....................2 14 0 14
Pickens ...................... 2 0 0 0
Tedesco ...................... 1 30"1 30
HARRIS...................1 21 0 21
MURRAY................... 1 13 0 13
Anderson...................1 0 0 0
TOTALS .................... 15 212 2 50
FUMBLE RECOVERIES
5-SIMPKINS 1-KEITZ
4-Tedesco 1-NICOLAU
2-METER 1-0. JOHNSON
2-Stephenson 1-Anderson
i-JOLLY 1-Howard
1-G. JOHNSON '
PASSES BROKEN UP
-SIMPKINS ARN Hwd
-2-Tedesco 4-Howard
4--Hicks 2-SEABRONJ 3-METER

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