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September 15, 1978 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

*1

Page 14-Friday, September 15, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Smith a University veteran

(Continued from Page 1)
Hastings, but decided he would most ef-
fectively serve the University in that
capacity.
He said he was very surprised when
the Regents asked him to replace
Fleming._
"WHEN THE REGENTS contacted
me on Monday, I thought they wanted
my assistance in finding a new
president. They told me they wanted a
response by Tuesday morning so that
Fleming's decision to leave and an-
nouncement of a new acting president
could be announced simultaneously,"
said Smith.
Hastings Law School Dean Marvin
Anderson commended the Regents
decision and said the school would

"sorely miss" Smith.
"The University of Michigan is to be
congratulated for its wisdom and per-
ception in persuading Professor Smith
to become president," said Dean An-
derson.
ANDERSON SAID the students were
greatly impressed by Smith when he
taught there in the fall of 1976 and were
eagerly awaiting his arrival on cam-
pus.
Smith refused to speculate on the
major issues facing the University
next year, explaining he had not had
time to meet with Fleming or other
administrators to discuss the agenda.
Smith was born on December 19, 1911
in Belgrade, Nebraska. After com-
pleting his undergraduate studies at

Nebraska State Teachers College a
the University of Nebraska, he earne
Master of Law degree at the Univers
in 1941.
AFTER A TWO YEAR stint in
Military Intelligence Service du
World War II, he returned to Ann Ar
in 1946 to lecture in law and work a
research associate.
In 1947, he was appointed an assists
professor offlaw at the University a
was promoted to associate professor
1950 and to professor in 1952.
He became dean of the Law School
1960 and vice-president for acaden
affairs in 1965. He resigned that post
1974 to return to teaching law. He se
he will continue his teaching duties
the remainder of the semester.

THE U. OF M.'S OFFICE OF MAJOR EVENTS PRESENTS

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Parents di
(Continued from Page 1)
necessitated the addition of 20 minutes
to the high schools' schedules, and the
time change caused a change in bus
scheduling, thus new elementary school
hours were needed. These new hours
have created problems for employed
parents who leave for work before their
children leave for school in the mor-
ning.
The board has suggested implemen-
tation of a child supervision program to
eleviate the situation, but the idea has
not been greeted enthusiastically.
The program would feature low-key
activities such as movies, arts and craf-
ts, beginning at 8 a.m., until school
starts. Parents would have to provide
transportation and pay a fee of $1 per
day for one child, and .75 for each ad-
ditional child..
President of the Ann Arbor Education
Assocition Larry Stewart, objects to the
charge. "We created this situation," he
said. "It's unfair to charge parents who
pay taxes for this service."
HOWEVER, DOUGLAS Walker, Ann
Arbor Schools Recreation Director,
said, "In most cases, for working
parents, they are already paying for a

sgruntled.
baby sitting service 4nd this would
hopefully be more educational. It would
be our hope that as the program
matures the supervisors will have some
feedback ,from teachers to set up
programs to' help benefit the child's
regulaf school."
The program could be harmful to the
children's development and education,
according to Thurston Elementary
School principal Burton Lamkin. "Our
concern is that the total school day is
being made longer," he noted. "The
llonger the school day, the more energy
used up, the less learning will take
place. Any child who attends that
program will be in school seven hours
and 20 minutes which is absurd for that
age group."
As an alternative to the program, en-
ding the school day later was
suggested, but decided against. Accor-
ding to Harry Howard, Schools Superin-
tendent, this plan "couldn't be done
without inconveniencing many, many
others." He noted that children par-
ticipating in intermediate intermural
sports programs and other after school
activities would be unable to return
home before dark.

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Kissinger:
Key issue
West Bank
conflict
(Continued from Page 1)
President Carter's Soviet policy.
don't think we have a fully settl
policy with respect to the Sovi
Union." But, Kissinger added, "co
siderable progress has been made o
the SALT talks."
When asked about the prospects
another oil embargo by Arab nation
Kissinger said the chances of a repe
of the 1973 embargo are much less tha
they used to be."
He explained that the combined e
fects of "Soviet penetration" in
Ethiopia and South Guyana and i
vestments over $100 billion by Sau
Arabia in Western industry woul
minimize the chances of an embargo.
WHEN ASKED during the afternoo.
briefing set up by Griffin staffers, wh
he thoughs of U.N. Ambassador A
drew Young's work, Kissinger said, "
have heard that President Carter ha
said Andy Young is doing a good jot
and if that's ture, he must b
moonlighting."
Griffin is running against Carl Levi
a Detroit Democrat. The two wi
debate for the first time this morning i
the first of three face-to-face appearar
ces. Today's debate will be Gaylord.
More than 200 people paid $500 eac
to hear Kissinger later that evenin
The former diplomat delivered a sha
ply anti-Soviet talk and labeled Carter
foreign policy "paralyzed."
He attended a luncheon in Southfiel
yesterday for another State Republi
seeking reelection, William Broomfiel
from the 19th Congressional district.
Tennessee
escapees
captured
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP)-Two
four prisoners who engineered a darin
escape in Tennessee and ditched
hijacked airplane in Arkansas wer
seized yesterday after colliding with
police car.
The other two escapees were not i
the car and eluded capture. They wer
believed to have two hostages.
THREE OTHER hostages who ha
been taken by the fugitives at variou
points along their trail were release
unharmed.
The Universit
of Michigan
Footbal
Scrapbook

r
r

SUNDAYOCT.1 AT 8:00 PM. chicken
HILL AUDITORIUM, ANN ARBOR and a fish
and avariety of sandwiches
Tickets are $8.50,$7.50 and $6.50.Tickets oon sale beginning Monday, Sep.18
at 10:00a.m. at theMichigan union Box Office. Tickets are also available at the order ahead
Huckleberry Warty Store in Ypsilanti,and Where House Records in Ypsilanti and 663-5151
East Lansin . Sorry no personal checks. Smoking and beverages strictly prohi-
bited in Hill uditorium. MAIL ORDER INFO: Enclose a money orderor certified and pick up the
check only and self addressed stamped envelope and send to: day of the game
SANTANA
Michigan Union Box Office 335 E. Huron
530 S. State Street
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

Hai/

to

the

Victors, VANGUARD 4

"
.
"
..UM-ILLINOIS
SPECIAL...,
HALFTIME CLASSICS featuring the 0
Michigan Marching Band, produced
by the UM Music School..."
a
0

The UNIVERSITY CELLAR presents
five VANGUARD releases, featuring

the

famous

UofM

BAND.

These fine recordings are available
at our everydaylowprices!!#

Here in scrapbook form are news-
paper clippings, team portraits, game
statistics and other souvenirs cover-
ing the football seasons from 1879
through 1977.
All the things you meant to save-
but didn't.

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