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September 15, 1978 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-15

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Page 6-Friday, Septenber 15, 1978-The Michigan Daily
UPPER DIVISION
WRITING COURSES
being offered through the
English Composition Board
T RM Any LSA Student is Eligible to
for FAElect These Courses
JOURNALISM 302
"Writing for Mass Media"
Marion Marzolf

0

HISTORY OF ART 305/MARC 323
"Themes and Symbols of Western Art"
Christin Bornstein
RUSSIAN 451
"Survey of Russian Literature"
Irvin Titunik
WOMENS STUDIES 360
"Women's Identity"
Sue'Weisskopf
ENGLISH 432
"The American Novel"
Bob Weisbuck

Whist)
By KAREN BORNSTEIN
It has never happened before - it
may never happen again.
That's because an exhibition of late
works by James McNeill Whistler that
is as complex, as extensive and as
skillfully displayed as the current one
at the University, is something which
occurs only after years of planning,
negotiating and consulting, along with a
sprinkling of luck.
And, this special sense of
temporariness is all the more reason to
visit the Museum of Art, and savor the
101 Whistler masterpieces borrowed
from galleries, museums and personal
collections all over the world, and
AUDITIONS
Soloists " Chorus * Orchestra
Johann Strauss'
GYPSY BARON
Sign up Wednesday, Sept. 20, 7:30 pm
Conference Room, New Fire Station
Corner Huron and Fifth
THE COMIC OPERA GUILD
For further info: 665-6074

Ler: 'poetry
perceptively grouped together to viewer as opposed to one o
complete an unforgettable ekhibit symbols.
entitled "Whistler: The Later Years." these "nocturnes" outline
THE EXHIBITION, featured through progression to more
October 8, helps to acquaint the public landscapes, street sce
with the master's contributions to the seascapes, painted in sumpt
art world between 1879 and 1903, the with glistening streams of i
year of his death, with a few earlier from a variety of directions
works included for comparison value, the culmination of his work
This celebration of oils, watercolors, never entirely dissociated hi
drawings, pastels, etchings and nature, and people are depi
lithographs unveils that the genius of golden, sun-kissed fields by
Whistler stretches far and beyond the
famous realist portrait of his -mother,
formally titled "Arrangement in Black
and Gray." For Whistler's approach to
art was modern in thought. If was an
art of reduction and discrimination of
detail. The resulting works offer k'
strength and harmony in their
simplicity of form.
His large series of "Nocturnes
(night scenes) done in the 1670s are a
beautifully subtle overlaying of .
translucent colors which tenderly fuse " ......-
to form a single overall atmosphere.
Vague outlines add a slight sense of
orientation, and with time ands,
concentration the true reality of
"night" penetrates through to the y

of its many
Whistler's
intimate
enes and
uous colors
ght flowing
. These are
. Whistler
mself from
cted within
small dabs

of sight

of rich color, but can never be mistake
from being human entities.
Be it the setting sun, the interior of'
woman's boudoir, shopfrong
alleyways or rivers - despite 'tf1h
tranquil subjects of these watercolof
Whistler gracefully treated his scene
as complex sections of a comple
world. In many of these smaller wor
his paint is sparse, floating within a se
of untouched background, his form
sketchy and his colors few, closel,

CLASSICAL STUDIES 371
"Greek & Roman Sports
Wally Sweet

and Recreation"

the colloborative: foicldasses 1978
ALL CLASSES WILL BEGIN THE FIRST WEEK OF OCTOBER, MEET ONCE A WEEK AND LAST 8 WEEKS.

t Q tik Carol Shostak', pe'fTaught
B kMonday,6:30-8:30 P.M. , Collaborative Room
Color, design and various techniques of this wax resist medium will be
taught for beginning as well as advanced students. Lab fee $8.00.
Caigraph Barbara Tannebaum, Ph.D. Cand., Univ. of Mich.
Irph Tuesday, 7-9 P.M., Collaborative Room
Learn to write beautifully and legibly as quickly as you do now. Stu-
dents will develop a rapid italic hand for everyday use and learn the
essentials of calligraphy--how to learn an alphabet, handling a pen,
touch, stroke, and spacing.
ChineseBush Painting MyHsiu, Graduate Nan-Tou
Muay, 7-9 P.M.
Learn the traditional painting technique of the Chinese masters. This
c assic.and expressive style will be taught through demonstrations and
exercises. Oriental subjects such as rivers, rocks, trees and flowers
will be focused upon.
Susan Groce, M.F.A. Cand., University of Michigan
DraWing -Monday, 7-9 P.M., Union Gallery
This introductory course will cover a broad range of drawing including
doodling, still life, portrait, figure, fantasy, landscape and abstract
depending on the interest and needs of the individual student. Major
emphasis will be on developing the student's ability to translate visu-
al images into drawn statements. No prior drawing experience is neces-
sary.
Enameling uth Pinks, Studied with Roseanna Tendler Worth
9Wednesday 7-9 P.M., Collaborative Room
The ancient art of enameling produces objects which glow with bril-
liant colors and have a quality of depth not found in any other med-
ium. The course will include all the basic techniques of enameling,
from preparation of the metal through 'application of design, firing,
and final finishing. Students will complete several pieces of jewelry
and one or two small dishes. Lab fee $5.00. Copper and findings
$3--8.00.
Jewelr Lee Curtain, M.F.A., E.M.U.
Basic fmetalsmithing techniques of fabrication and casting will be
taught with'peciaT emphasis on the casting of natural and found ob-
jects, Lab fee $6.00.
-^Richard Marks, M.F.A., Center/Creative Studies
L.eaded Glass Thursday, 7-9 P.M., Collaborative Room
The age-old art of fitting stained glass into lead channels is now a
dynamic art medium. Students will learn techniques such as lead came
and copper foil, working in 2 and 3 dimensions to create beautiful win-
dows,, lamps, sculptures and more. Lab fee $10.00.
g Mayeve Tate, M.S., University of Californfa
9 Monday, 7-9 P.M., Collaborative Room
Colorful, bright and so warm, the auilt is an important part of our

Quilting cont. artistic heritage. Students will be intro-
duced to the vast variety of quilts and quilt-
ing techniques and will learn the basic steps in making one. A "sam-
pler" quilt will be made. Lab fee $2.50.
PL kot a E-ohsa1Instructor to be announced
. H' O'ro 9 Wednseday, 7-9 P.M. South Quad Darkroom
Open a third.eye on'the world in this introductory class. Basic tech-
niqUts including the use of the camera, film processing and printing,
negative and print evaluation and filters will be taught.Lab Fee $7.50
P t r h 1 Ben Colman III, M.F.A. Cand., Cranbrook Academy
9 P Tuesday, 7-9 P.M., South Quad Darkroom
This advanced course for persons with previous darkroom experience,
offers through slide presentations an historical perspective from 1826
to the present. Technical problems of the darkroom will be posed in
conjunction with shooting assignments.in social documentary, landscape,
portraiture and interior scapes. Lab Fee $7.50
Abbey Pachter, Grad. work in Printmaking.
Wednesday,7-9 P.M., Collaborative Room
This course is designed to involve the student in a variety of relief
printmaking techniques. These will include wood block printing (cross
and end grain), linoleum carving, collotype and glass monoprinting.
Various papers will be used, matting techniques will be taught. We
will explore the U. of M. Museum of Art's print collection. Wurk out-
side of class time will be encouraged but not mandatory.
Sculpture. Norma Penchansky, M.A., E.M.U.
"'r~'Wednesday, 1:00-3;00 P.M.
Working with terra cotta clay, students will learn to model the human
form. The figure and head will be emphasized while working from a
model. The last two classes will be held at the University of Michi-
gan Museum of Art where students will work from original art works by
famous sculptors. All pieces will be finished and fired. A lab fee
of $15.00 covers clay and model fees.
Carol Jacobsen, B.F.A., E.M.U.
Watercooi r Monday 7-9 P.M.,' Pendleton Room
A spontaneous and playful introduction to the medium of watercolor,
this class will experiment with wash techniques, imprinting, resists,
transparencies and matting.
Kathy Hutchinson, M.S., University of Michigan
n9 Monday, 7-9 P.M., Pendleton Roem
Color, texture, design, basic tapestry and loom techniques will be
taught and used in a sampler and weaving of the student's own design.
Discussions will be held on the use of the loom for functional and
creative purposes, dyeing yarn, and finishing pieces. Advanced stu-
dents are welcome. A lab fee of $5.00, payable the first day of class,
will purchase materials provided by the instructor.

"The Doorway, Venice" is among the many pieces featured in the University
Museum of Art's exhibition, "Whistler: The Liter Years."

DETROIT
PISTONS

.b--:_. _. __
-

CLEVELAND
CAVALIERS
CRISLER
ARENA
SEPT ..
24
8PM- 1
TICKETS:
UACTICKET CENTRAL
MICHIGAN UNION
LOBBY S4 &S5

resembling the style of Oriental
painting. In each of these less massive
works, the experience as a whole is
equally enchanting.
ALTHOUGH THESE smaller works
which dominate most of the exhibit
have been somewhat neglected
throughout most of the century the
portrait was also a very important
means of creative expression for
Whistler, and basically unsuccessful
when executed. When depicting ,his
subjects he neither endowed them with
qualities which were nonexistent nor
flattered certain ones that did.
Instead, he painted what he saw and
enjoyed. He was known for taking what.
pleased him, and leaving the rest. N
There is a softness in Whistler's style
of painting a portrait and one'.s
attention is always diverted to the eyes;
eyes that are deep and penetrating bllt
incredibly vulnerable and sensitive 4t
the same time, magical eyes that
slowly grip you and bring you under
their spell and don't let you go, as in his
portrait of a young girl entitled, "LittLe
Rose of Lyme Regis."
Whistler once said, "As music is tlh
poetry of sound, so is painting the
poetry of sight." A finer group of poems
may never have been painted.

_ ~t
1-~~-
Z
r~ _- .r
Workshop Fee $27.00 unless otherwise noted. w o r s
Bring a .sack lunch on long days.

ef4

Intro.to Graphic Desin Instructor to be announced.
4 Week Sessions beg. Oct. 4,Wednes ay, 7-9 P.M., Union Gallery
This beginning class in graphic techniques focuses on preparation of
bus tness cards, logos, brochures, stationary and flyers for camera-
ready production. Students will undertake their own projects with the
help of the instructor. No art experience is necessary.'
Portfolio Worksho Eric GayB.S. Industrial Design
PortolioWork hop Professional Photographer
.Lecture: Fri. Oct. 6, 7-9 PM; Workshop: Sat., Oct. 7, 9 AM-4 PM.
The portfolio has become a necessity in the acceptance of the artist .
to exhibitions and schools. This workshop is designed to instruct and
assist those interested in taking professional slides and pic-
tures for use in a portfolio. Lectures and actual practice in photo-
graphing artwork will be available to participants.
Fee: Guild members-$13.00; Non-members-$16.00.
P i i Zubel Kachadoorian
P ifnil9 Prix de Rome, 1956-59.
Sunday, Oct. 15 and Sunday, Oct. 22, llAM-5PM, Ann Arbor Art Assoc.
Zubel Kachadoorian's work strives to tell us something about who we
a-re, and why we live as we do. Earthy and yet ethereal, his paintings
express strong humanistic grounding. For this workshop, students will
bring their choice of painting media and will work from a model or :
still life. Zubel will demonstrate techniques and work with partici-
pants individually. We are co-sponsering this workshop with the Ann
arbor Art Association.
October 10. 7:30 P.M. Pendleton Room
No Admission Charge.
John Glick, potter;- an accountant; and a Guild member will discuss
the ins and outs of making one's way with bookkeeping, tax records,
financial planning and apprenticeships.

Fiber Techniques in Meta LFaculty.S
October 21-22, 10:00 A.M.- 4:00 P.Mf, Collaborative Room.
This workshop, taught by nationally known Mary Lee Hu, will explore in
metal, techniques traditionally used in fiber, examples of which are
wrapping, coiling, tatting, knitting, twining, and card weaving. Al-
though students will work on pieces of their own design during the work-
shop, the major emphasis is on exposure to ideas and processes rather
than finished work. Necessary equipment is minimal and inexpensive
copper magnet wire can be used as well as silver wire. Interested nov-
ices and accomplished metal and fiber craftspeople can benefit from this
rich exchange of ideas.
How about Hats?',Pat Williams, M.F.A., Indiana University
How o out ots? Facplty, E.M.U.
October 28-29, 10:00 A.M.- 4:00 P.M., Collaborative Room.
Headpieces can be both ritualistic and zany. Feltmaking techniques and
additional fiber ornamentation wil be taught so that you can make that
hat which reflects the real you. Slides will be shown to demonstrate '
the historical and contemporary uses of felt and headpieces. Spend a
weekend designing your head. Lab Fee $5.00 for wool.
Ann Savagea, M.F.A.
Textile M sks orthe Theatre Faculty/Residential Col.
November 18-19, 10:00 A.M.- 4:00 P.M., Collaborative Room
Theatre and dance design is an avenue for textile innovation. Bring
your favorite play or'ballet as inspiration for your masks. Partici-
pants are asked to be familiar with at least one of the fiber techniques
that will be possible to use: weaving, knitting,.crochet, plaiting, bas-
ketry, knotting (macrame), felting, stitching and stuffing. Materials
to suit the imagination include fabric scraps, threads, yarns, cords,
washed and carded fleece, wire, found objects.
Open darkroom space is available through the Collab-
Darkroom orative and South Quad. Call 763-4430 for details.

+r*

s 4444

! ,.

A 42
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31
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FOR FURTfHER INFORMATION, CONTACT THE COLLABORATIVE, 2ND FLOOR, MICHIGAN UNION, 763-4430.
$24.00 for 8 2-hr. sessions. Classes begin Oct. 2
-..-..-..---.-...--..--.-----.------------------------------------------------------- ----- ---- --------
The Collanborative Workshoo li- . -Thp (nllnknrntiv W rLkhnrn

GUARD YOUR DOOR, INSURE YOUR PRIVACY, PROTECT YOUR PROPERT
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OPEN A NEW CHECKING OR SAVINGS ACCOUNT AND ASK FOR YOL
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