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September 14, 1978 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FELLINI'S 1970
SATYRICON
The fragments that remain of Petromius Arbeter's picturesque novel of im-
perial Rome Fellini expanded into an epic vision of chaos within formal
grandeur. There is a curious insolence .about the sexually accomplished
student-hero, his boy cover and his mercenary best friend-the trio whose
wild adventures form the narrative framework of this extraordinary and
accomplished film in color!
FRI: MR. PEEPS GOES TO TOWN

Page 6-Thursday, September 14, 1978-TheMichigan Daily
Living Dead'director
Romero to spea

RECORDS.

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

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Znd Floor, Michig an Uinion
I Sept. 1 3,14,1 5-3-5 P.M. I
Sept I 4-7-9 P.M.
Find out what UA C is all about
Meet representativesfrom our committees: I
Soph Show Dorm Programming
Musket Mediatrics
viewpoint Lectures Homecoming Committee I
I Michigan Union Programming Special Events
Eclipse Jazz For more Information, TceCnta I
UAC is a student-run organization providing cultural programs
and entertainment for students of the University of Michigan.
This coupon good for 1 free UAC t-shirt at Open House

Cult films, those semi-obscure
cinematic oddities that inspire
maniacal worship among their fans,
seem to be the fad of the day. Witness
the ever-growing popularity of The
Rocky Horror Picture Show, which
recently played several weekend
showings not at Angell Hall, or some
pseudo-theater like the Matrix Theater,
but at Ann Arbor's own Briarwood
Mall. Some cult fanatics may be
slightly deranged, but there's no
dlenying that the phenomenon is coming
out of the closet of midnight showings.
As yet, one of these filmic wonders
endures as the unqualified king of the
cult circuit - George Romero's 1968
horror story, Night of !the Living Dead.
Whether seen as simply a horrific

UM Stylists
at the
UNION
Dove, Harold,
8 Chet
OPEN: MON.-SAT.
8:30 A.M.-5:15 P.M.

THE 1979 MICHIGANENSI EARBOOK
Meeting: THURSDAY, SEPT. 14-7 P.M.
MICHIGANENSIAN OFFICE, 2nd FLOOR,
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BUILDING,
420 MAYNARD
Photographers, journalists, writers, artists-we can use you and you
can use the 79 Michiganensian as a permanent portfolio for your
work. New or old staff, inexperienced or battlescarred.
--EVERYTHING IS NEW-EVERYONE'S STARTING OVER
COME BE PART OF THE FUN
OF COVERING THE UNIVERSITY
The University of Michigan
Professional Theatre Program

vision or an allegorical statement con-
cerning the Viet Nam War and the
gross decay of American institutions,
this gruesome tale unfolds on a level of
terror seldom achieved on the screen.
No other cult film - be it Harold and
Maude, Pink Flamingoes, or The Texas
Chainsaw Massacre - has struck such
a central nerve in the movie-going con-
sciousness and Night of the Living Dead
is still conceded to be the horror film
that will outlast them all.
FOR THOSE who've never seen it, the
film concerns an other-worldly
epidemic in which the newly-dead are
"woken" by radio activity, and search
the countryside to feed their insatiable
appetite for human flesh. A small group
of potential victims takes refuge in a
deserted farmhouse, desperately
utilizing all their ingenuity to fence out
the unrelenting mass of inhuman mon-
sters.
Traditional poetic justice isthrown to
the winds, as the attacks spring with no
warning or logic, and respect of
traditional values ends in no reward.
Although there are some cheap
moments of pedestrian political satire,
on the whole, Night of the Living Dead
sustains a consistency and aura of pure
insanity that marks it as a remarkable
achievement.'
George Romero, the man who
created the film ten years ago, will be
appearing at Angell Auditorium A this
evening to speak and show his new film,
Martin, which opened in New York only
several months ago. Night of the Living
Dead will be shown at 7:00, Martin at
9:00, and Romero will speak and an-
swer questions following each showing.
MARTIN, a vampire film that repor-
tedly "equates the mythical vampire
with the contemporary sex criminal,"
has been greeted by enthusiastic
reviews in Newsweek and The Village
Voice, and promises, at least, to'
provide some items that are not the
stuff of your basic Bela Lugosi flick. As
for Romero, see for yourself. If the man
is as bizarre as his films, it could prove
a most interesting evening.

t_
,.
f;ji

By MIKE TAYLOR
In a number of interviews carefully
timed to coincide with the release of his
latest album, Bob Dylan said he had
returned to the rich, organ-based music
of Blonde on Blonde, his rock 'n' roll
masterpiece of the sixeties.'
"Wow!" shouts the Dylan freak who
liked Blood on the Tracks, but felt it
was too folk-based, who enjoyed Desire,
but didn't know quite what to make of
massive fantasies like "isis,"
"Romance In Durango," and "Black
Diamond Bay."
THERE ARE OTHER reasons for
expecting the best from Street-Legal.
Dylan's performances on the Rolling
Thunder Revue tour were his best in
years, and his medley of tunes on The
Band's Last Waltz rocked with a
delightful joi do vivre.
Promises, promises. They aren't
always kept. Dylan must have been
thinking about something else when he
was making Street-Legal, for his heart
doesn't seem to be in it. Rather than a
burst of fresh energy, this album is an
aimless, confusing, ultimately boring
record. While it's not as vapid as Self
Portrait or Dylan, it nevertheless reeks
of incompetence masked by Dylan's
guise of moral superiority.
"Changing of the Guard," "New
Pony," "No Time to Think," and
"Senior ('Tales Of Yankee Power)"
make no sense to me, andthat makes
me mad. I never had any trouble
understanding what "The Times Are A-
Changin'," "Like A Rolling Stone," or
"Idiot Wind" meant, so I don't think it's
my fault. But I bet Dylan will offer no
apologies for writing such oblique,
irritatingscollections of words. If he had
any consideration for his audience, he
wouldn't have included them in the first
place.

I, -

Street-Legal
Bob Dylan
Columbia JC 35453

STREET-LEGAL ambitiously
creates a new-kind of Dylan music, and
in that sense works very well. The ever-
present harmonica has been cast aside;
instead, Dylan uses Steve Douglas'
saxophone to sweeten his melodies. To
counter-balance his still gravelly voice,
he hired three back-up singers who
sound just like the "colored girls" Lou
Reed sang about in "Walk on the Wild
Side." And, as Dylan promised, the
rolling sounds of an organ are
everywhere. Though this newq sound is
no doubt part of the game plan toward
renewed commercial success that
includes the hiring of Jerry Weintraub
as manager, I like it for its vitality and
clarity.
Once upon a time, Bob Dylan wrote
songs worth listening to. Songs like "I
Want You," "I'll Be Your Baby
Tonight," and "Tonight I'll Be Staying
Here With You." BFive of the cuts on
Street-Legal are love songs. As the first
Dylan love songs we've heard since his
marriage ended, they had great
potential for revealing feelings of ,a
man hurt and disillusioned by such an
experience. Dylan writes about Sara,
for sure, but in country-flavored, easy-
going tunes that sound little different
from the millions of love songs other
writers have penned.
"WHERE ARE YOU Tonight
(Journey Through Dark 'Heat)" opens
with a jazzy blend of percussion and
saxophone. Enter Dylan:
There's a long distance train/Rolling
through the rain,
Tears on my left and right,
There's a woman Ilong to touch/And
I'm missing her so much,
But she's drifting like a satellite .
Oooh, where are you tonight?
Dylan sings these lines with the
finger-poppin' ease of a Vegas
performer. Emotion? Sinceritt? Who
needs then when you've got a catchy
melody? Look for plenty of Johnny
Mathis/John Denver covers.
Still, "Baby Stop Crying," "Is Your
Love in Vain?" and "True Love Tends
To Forget" have awfully pretty
melodies. It's a shame their lyrics are
so hollow.
STREET-LEGAL is the first Bob
Dylan album made to be played softly
in the background while you occupy
your mind with something more
interesing, like checkers. Follow that
advice, and you'll probably find
yourself humming some of the tunes
after a while. But try to make sense of
the lyrics, and you'll get so frustrated
you might smash the record on your
floor. And where would you be then?
Join the
arts staff
The Daily Arts department is looking
for writers to cover every facet of the
Ann Arbor artistic community. If you
are interested in writing reviews,
features, or anything else pertaining to
the wealth of cultural activity in Ann
Arbor, stop by The Daily office at 420
Maynard and ask to see one of the arts
editors.
This Sunday, there will be a meeting
for the Arts staff and all prospective
writers at 6:00 p.m. at The Daily. In ad-
dition, look for various meetings next
week in different dormitories and a
mass meeting at The Daily the 19th.

BEZfILEL PORTEN
Professor of Jewish History,
Hebrew University, Jerusalem
LECTURING
Thursday afternoon at 4 P.M. 3050 Frieze
"NEW INSIG HTS INTO
AIRAMAIC TEXTS"
Friday evening at 9 P.M.
at Hillel, 1429 Hill St.
"KING DAVID'S WAITERGOTE:
THE FATAL FLAW&F
Sponsored by Studies in Religion, Judaic Studies,
Department of Near East Studies and Hillel

in the Power Center
SALLY ANN HOWES
CARL LIJ#
WRIGHTSON & HUNT
The
SOUND
Of MUSIC
O TERRY SAUNDERS
October 6-8

November 3-5

I

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4 First Prizes: Full-size Bally'Pinball Machines.
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, t &'Nusical Ztertainnent
MUSIC & LYRICS BY
STEPHEn SONDHEIM
February 2-4

STOR lBOX

sWING -INE TOT M. P O Box 2154 westbury, N.Y. 11591
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N1Important: Write your guess outside envelope, lower
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'Mfg's suggested retail price
OFFICIAL RULES: NO PURCHASEREQUIRED. Hand-
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i,,_
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