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September 07, 1978 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-07

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 7, 1978-Page 1
REGENTS APPROVE PLAN FOR MORE SPACE
Union to become student center;:
By SHELLEY WOLSON $1.50. President Fleming described the "We've quadrupled programming for programming such as coffee hous
Plans to revitalize the Union with sum as "less than the price of a movie." this year, starting with a kick-off "We also hope to arrange more lo
ore student programming are now After the proposal was unanimously night-a giant all-nighter crammed areas, and more student office spa
Iderway after the Regents approved a approved, six student leaders ex- with activities such as a raffle, movies University Cellar would also have a
udy showing a need for an activities pressed their support for Fleming's and disco dancing lessons," said Union expansion-
Theacrease wirequest that the Union be reorganized Programming Committee Chairman "It will be a place for interact
ace lnas em. e uprtdb to attract more students and that the Jeff Lebow. between students hand faculty," s

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mandatory $1.50 student fee. Vice-
President for Financial Affairs James
Brinkerhoff appointed a committee to
study the reorganization and operation
of the Union, to look into its present
status.
"CONCERNED students came to us
and said that the Union is not a warm,
friendly place that students can
gather," said committee chairman and
assistant to the Vice-President for
Financial Affairs William Sturgis.
"We're working very hard on im-
proving the food service, physical
stature, electrical and mechanical
aspects of the Union. We're also looking
into the unfortunate financial state of
the 'U' Club," Sturgis added.
The student space plan, which was
endorsed by' student leaders and ad-
ministrators, was passed unanimously
at the Regents' February meeeting.
The plan required renovationsand new
equipment for increased space in the
Plant building next to Crisler Arena
and the Student Activities Building
(SAB) workshop.
COSTS FOR THESE buildings were
estimated at $360,000 and bus service
expansion and increased maintenance
will add $24,000 to the total.,Theatre and
craft groups can also expect more
space as each student pays the required

Regents relinquish control.
Sturgis said he hopes the committee's
recommendation list will be ready to go
before the Regents' September
meeting. "We're shooting for Septem-
ber and we hope to get drafts out before
then for reactions. Our plan will try to
find solutions for the problems that
people saw," he said.
STURGIS SAID the committee had
talked to many different groups and
had received many good suggestions
for improvements.
Union programming is now routed
through the University Activities Cen-
ter (UAC). The Union Program Com-
mittee, under the auspices of UAC, has
been increasingly active in the past
year and has already sent a full
schedule of events for this year. Last
year's top events included the revival of
"Michigras," a huge all-campus car-
nival. Other activities included dances,
a white elephant sale and mini-courses.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results -
Call 764-0557

"THE UNION CAN be a nice, warm
cozy place," he added.
Some of the physical changes they
hope to implement are a student
rathskeller which would be a quiet bar
at night sometimes featuring different

Larry Pulkownik, student president of
the Union Board of directors.
"All of these new activities bring
vitality to the building. UAC progri
ammers are really working hard orb
that," Sturgis said.

LEATHER GOODS
* VESTS * POUCHES
t- f " * BOOK BAGS * BELT BUCKLES
*CUSTOM MADE LUGGAGE
WALTER DYER MOCCASINS
CRAFTk * TRAVEL BAGS
----'-- P71NCUSTOM LEATHER
LO0 WHOLESALE - RETAIL
IL-TS-5AG 665-5575 '┬░"
SRIIPCASMS OPEN MON.FRI
A1 AM -PM S UNIVERSITY
HATrs SAT AM-S PM
r1 II $ 6l11S. FOREST aAlJ4NARBOR a B R~3
ivsl off S. University a'

E-
!

University President Robben Fleming tells MERC Judge Shlomo Sperka why he -
thinks GSAs are not employees, during a hearing earlier this summer.
Judge to determine
'GSAs' worker status

6-

U

the
what, how
when, why
where of

(Continued from Page One)
students. If they are deemed em-
ployees, GSAs will be assured collec-
tive bargaining rights under the
Michigan Public Employment
Relations Act, and the University will
be legally bound to negotiate a contract
with them.
University officials, however, con-
tend, that GSAs are students. Ad-
ministrators have testified that GEO
members are not employees because
GSAs are offered their positions on the
basis of their performance in their
graduate-level classes.
UNIVERSITY Vice President for
Academic Affairs Harold Shapiro said
during testimony this summer, that
the positions are offered as a form of
financial aid. He said GSAs are not
evaluated on their ability to teach and
are given their ' "jobs" because
teaching experience "fulfills a training
function" for graduate students.
GEO maintains that its members are,
in fact, employees.
GEO President Mike Clark says, "'We
do provide services and for those ser-
vices we are paid a wage. These ser-
vices- are a profit and an aid to the
University."
THIS SUMMER'S hearings came as
a result of a MERC ruling which came
down last January. The commission
stated that it could not rule on a Univer-
sity appeal of an earlier Sperka ruling
unless evidence was heard on\ the
student-worker issue.
The appeal was made on an August
1977 ruling in which.Sperka found the
University guilty of an unfair labor
practice (ULP) for refusing to sign a
contract with GEO in November 1976.
The administration refused to sign the
pact pending resolution of two unsettled
grievances left over from the previous
contract..
Later, the union said it was willing to
drop the charges but the University op-
ted to bring the case before MERC for a
clear decision on the student-worker
question.
MERC PROCEDURE calls for an
administrative law judge to hear cases
and pass a recommendation on to the
commission as a whole, which makes a
final ruling. If either side in the dispute
objects to the recommendation, it can
appeal to the entire commission, as the
University did last September. If there
are no objections, MERC usually ac-
cepts the judge's recommendation as
its decision.
In hearings before Sperka in the
summer of 1977, University lawyers at-
tempted to enter evidence that GSAs
are students, not employees, but
Sperka would not admit any evidence
on the student-worker question,
SUBSCRIBE TO THE
DAILY-Call 764-0558

claiming it had been settled by a 1973
Michigan Supreme Court decision. In
that ruling, interns and residents at
University Hospital were found to be
students And employees - and were
allowed t? form a union.
The University appealed Sperka's
original ruling, which favored GEO, to
the full commission. MERC, however,
said it could not rule on the appeal
without hearing testimony on the
question of whether GSAs are students
or employees. Consequently, the com-
mission ordered the case back to
Sperka and explicitly ordered him to
allow evidence on the issue.
During this past summer's hearings,
Sperka has indeed allowed testimony
on the matter. But no matter how he
rules, the losing side will undoubtedly
appeal and the case could progress up
to the state Supreme Court, a process
which may take as long as four years.

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┬ęCopyright 1978

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