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September 08, 1978 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-08

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The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents at Aud. A
WEDNESDAY, September 13
THE BEST WAY
(Claude Miller, 1975) 7 & 10:33--AUD A
A beguiling comic drama concerning tronsvestismp, humiliation, and a quest for
friendship in a boy's camp. This remgrkobly assured first film by the past assist-
ant to Truffaut, Godard and Bresson has received great praise in Europe for
its perceptive rendering of childhood crises and sensitive performances. ANN
ARBOR PREMIERE. In French, with subtitles.
LANCELOT OF THE LAKE
(Robert Bresson, 1974) 8:40 ONLY-AUD A
Bresson's severe vision of the Arthurian legends of Camelot and the Quest for
the Holy Grail. He removes all the gloss and fat that Hollywood has dumped
oan the medieval romance and leaves a starkly beautiful world of clanking
armor, great piety, and impossible honor. "Bresson's latest film is on unquali-
fied masterpiece. It is a film that only he could make."-TAKE ONE. "A film to
see again and again; never have economics of composition, of editing, of bridg-
ing dialogue been more beautifully planned."-THE NEW YORKER. Critics Prize,
Cannes Film Festival, 1974. In French, with subtitles. Plus Short: TO PARISFAL
(Bruce Bilee, 1963). In a few short moments (16 minutes), Bailee captures the
essence of all great epics and quests. Music by Wagner.
TOMORROW: George Romero night. NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD and
MARTIN. The director will speak.

Page 12-Saturday, September 9, 197$-The Michigan Doily

Weak Antony buries 'aesar'

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in.

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A A _.J A.A.AA AA A A A_ A A &.A.A . J. J _ .J_ A __ A

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~Legislation.
has already raised
the drinking age to 19
effective Dec. 3, 1978; BUT a
further proposal, Proposition D,
fftewould change the drinking age to 21
effective Nov. 18, 1978-with NO grandfather *
'clause (the drinking age will be raised 3 years in
one stroke of the pen, taking the right to drink away from
over half a million young adults)-THIS MEANS YOU-
THESEODCAE
IS HOLDING A BENEFIT TO Protect the Rights of Young
Adults featuring ...
Proceeds to go to fight Proposition D.
Register Now and Vote NO on Proposition D
PROTECT YOUR RIGHTS
POLITICAL AD PAlD FOR BY Second Chance

(Continued trom rage 6
them. Pennell lends his Brutus the ap-
propriate idealist's sir, projecting him
as a deliberative Stevensonian martyr
passionately striving to remain above
the bare-knuckles power struggle
The
Peace
Corps is
live and
wuell and
for you.
All your life you've
wanted to do something im-
portant for the world. Now a
lot of the world needs you to
do it. We need volunteers with
skills and all kinds of practical
knowledge. Call toll free:-
800-424-8580. Peace
corps

swirling about him. Yet once drawn
down into the political cesspool, this
most high-minded of leaders finds him-
self pathetically and tragically lacking
in the basic hatchetman's tools
necessary for survival in a' world of
vipers.
While Scarfe's Cassius remains very
much the covetous instigator, the actor
encases him in a surprisingly sym-
pathetic tone combined with a force of
authority that proves an effective coun-
terweight to Brutus' always compelling
presence. Too often Cassius is por-
trayed as a kind of frenetic, prissy
housefly buzzing discontentedly around
the sturdy countenance of his noble
colleague; Scarfe's refreshing inter-
pretation restructures his character not
as a hate-the-world malcontent, but as
a thoughtful man who gambles for
power and loses, and is willing to accept
the consequences.
DIRECTOR WOOD'S somewhat
spare staginge and Susan Benson's
austere sets fare generally better in the
more cloistered Act II than in the tur-
bulent Act I; in the latter, a touch here

and there of Zefferelli pizazz might
have been helpful. The assassination
scene is marred by the strange decision
to use invisible daggers, thus throwing
an expressionist anomaly into an
otherwise determinedly realistic
production. The effect is .of Caesar
being mugged rather than murdered,
and the scene turns almost comical as a
result.
The unique notion of having Calphur-
nia sit by her husband's body during the
funeral oration works rather well; the
subsequent revealing of Caesar's cor-
pse as mummified and cobwebbed is
grotesque and pointless. To Wood's
credit, the conspirators' midnight
meeting is appropriately, eerie and
fraught with menace, and the final
farewell of Brutus and Cassius before
their last battle is unusually moving.
Stratford veteran Eric Donkin
acquits himself as Caesar about as well
as one could expect, since ultimately
the role is so small and symbolic as to
severely limit any real thespian,
achievement. Mary Savidge also does
nicely in the equally unrewarding role
of his wife Calphurnia. The rest of the

multi-charactered cast is competent i
not memorable, though Frank
Maraden's Casca must be singled out
for special praise. Gesticulating
engagingly with his gangly scarecrow's
body, Maraden invests his part with
such an infectious energy and humor
that in some ways his performance is
the most memorable in the show.
At the opposite end of the ledger is
Jack Wetherall, whose Bowery Boys
rendition of Octavious is a grating an-
noyance mercifully alleviated by the
relative brevity of the part. Wetherall
once again cements his standing as an
actor of profoundly miniscule talent,
and his persistent presence in major
Stratford roles must remain a vexing
mystery to the audience and an ongoing
embarrassment to a theatrical com-
pany so otherwise rich in talent.
This talent is apparent everywhere in
Julius Caesar; it's just that the creative
sparks don't really fly often enough in a
production that is on the whole perfec-
tly respectable but just a little too
thematically muddled and artistically
laid back to remain in one's memory
nearly as long as it should have.

Legionnaires disease hits N. Y.

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A Public service d
This Newspaper &
The Advertising Council

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VOCALS' CM hJ
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523 e. Iier
m n~ st' Ii9su .2 r IlNt.
994 03 SNLLIUNAS V ;

NEW YORK (AP) - Faced with five
confirmed cases of Legionnaires
disease and 50 suspected ones, city
officials announced new steps
yesterday to prevent any further
spread of the disease, which so far has
been confined to the bustling garment
district.
In Memphis, Tenn., meanwhile,
authorities at Baptist Hospital
announced the death of one of five
persons confirmed to have the
mysterious disease. Hospital
spokesman Maurice Elliott said the
The ancient Colossus of Rhodes was a
bronze statue that stood 120 feet high. It
was toppled by an earthquake in 227
B.C.

victim, a 44-year-old man, died shortly
before 11 a.m. yesterday. The hospital
also said that two of the other four
victims, three of whom remained
hospitalized, were employees of the
hospital.
FIRE Department officials in New
York opened a campaign to drain and
disinfect water towers atop each
building in the midtown Manhattan
area where 75,000 garment industry
workers are employed. Business,
meanwhile, continued in the district,
which includes Madison Square Garden
and Herald Square.
The number of suspected and
confirmed cases of the disease in New
York rose from 43 to 55 from Thursday
to yesterday. There have been two
confirmed deaths from the disease and
it is suspected as the cause of a third
death.

Mayor Edward Koch appealed for a'
end to rumor-mongering and asked
those who work and live in the nation's
largest city to stay calm.
LEGIONNAIRES disease, which is
caused by a bacterium and kills 10
cent to 15 per cent of its victims, got it
name after it claimed the lives of 29
persons who attended a 1976 American
Legion convention in Philadelphia.
Dr. David Fraser, one of the chief
investigators into the Philadelphiq
outbreak and many others since, joine
city officials in efforts to discover th.
source of the disease, which has strut
in isolated cases and in "clusters."
Fraser, chief of a special unit at thr
U.S. Center for Disease Control irt
Atlanta, said he would not speculate
why the disease sprang up in the
garment district until he coul
investigate the situation.
The announcement of the
Legionnaires disease occurrence i
Memphis was made Thursday night b,
hospital spokesman Elliott. He said
there were four suspected cases as wel
as the five confirmed ones. It was th
second outbreak of Legionnaire
disease in Tennessee. There were 2%
cases and four deaths in Kingsport last
October.
Health officials in Washington, D.C.
said yesterday they had one confirmed
and one probable case of Legionnaires
disease.
Rudrunande Ashr rn
640 OXFORD, ANN ARBOR
OFFERS INTRODUCTORY
CLASSES IN MEDITATION
AND KUNDALINI YOGA
For Further i lormation
Call 995-5483
Free hatha yoga classes are offered
every Tuesday and Thursday at 5 pm.

Ummmmmmmn

BOOK RUSH!
THIS YEAR TRY ULRICH'S.
BOOK RUSH HOURS
SEPTEMBER 5-14

MON.-FRI.
SATURDAY
SUNDAY

8:30-9:00
9:30-6:00
12:00-5:00

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