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December 09, 1978 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COMMON CAUSE HITS PRACTICE

schi v
DETROIT (UPI)' - Former Ann Arbor
;;Congressman Marvin Esch has earned $5,400 from
investments made possible by a $55,000 campaign
surplus from his 1976 race for the Senate, the Detroit
'ews reported yesterday.
The investments were perfectly legal but have been
strongly criticized by officials of the Common Cause
political reform lobby, the News said.
ISCH, 50,now a lobbyist for U.S. Steel Corp., used
leftover campaign funds to invest in high-yield
,municipal and utility bonds, to rent cars, buy
'hirplane tickets, and pay his income.tax, according to

ested campaign funds

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, December 9, 1978-Page 7
Legislature OKs
anti-bugprop'osa~l

federal records checked by the newspaper.
Esch, a Republican, called the investments a
".safeguard against inflation" and contended the
other expenses were campaign-related even though
some occurred two years after the election.
"It's just plain wrong," said Fred Wertheimer,"
.Common Cause vice president for operations. "Even
though it's legal, paying off present-day expenses
with money raised for a past campaign just doesn't
fit the spirit of the election law."
RULES ADOPTED by the Senate and House this
year forbid members from using campaign surpluses

for personal expenses, but these do not apply to
defeated candidates like Esch, who lost a race
against Democratic Sen. Donald Riegle.
Officials of the Federal Elections Commission said
that in the case of losing candidates, the only
stipulation regarding leftover campaign funds is that
they not be spent for any unlawful purpose.
Wertheimer said unsuccessful candidates should
be bound by the same rules as winners.
"Fo~r the sake of public confidence," he said, "we
have to have better controls over people leaving the
electoral system."

(Cnnhinued from Paigel1)
Womens' Hospital. Yet Hospital
Director Neva Kuehn said the phone
company must have made a mistake.
"I know there is no monitoring
system," she said. "I don't like them,
and they aren't anything I wou""l ever
want to work with."
COMMUNICATIONS Center office
manpger Janice Batalucco initially
denied that her office, which supervises
University information, employs a
monitoring system. However, in a later

conversation, Batalucco
acknowledged, "We do have a
monitoring system here - strictly for
training -it is not used on a continuous
basis.
This means the supervisors
sometimes listen in on calls, but do not
record them on tape. Batalucco said
she could not estimate how frequently
calls are monitored.

;.

Israel'i
(continued from Page 1)
strong and. free Israel-had been
realized in her lifetime. "We pray that
the second great dream of Golda Meir's
life, for which she worked and hoped
and prayed all her life, will soon be
realized: a just and lasting peace in the
Middle East," he said.
In a message of condolence to the
Israeli government, U.N. Secretary-
General Xurt' Waldheim praised Meir
for "her dedication to her country."
The gray-haired elder stateswoman
died at ,4:28 p.m. yesterday. The
hospital said family members were at
her bedside in the final hours.

s Golda Meir dies, at 80

SHE HAD BEEN in and out of the
hospital in recent months, being admit-
ted to Hadassah ,for the last time Oct.
29. It was reported then she was suf-
fering from back trouble caused by a
slipped disc. Later it was reported she
had developed a viral infection and was
being treated for jaundice, a liver
ailment.
A hospital spokeswoman disclosed
yesterday that the cancer had been
detected 10 or 12 years ago, and she was
first treated with radiotherapy and
later by chemotherapy.
There had been sketchy and uncon-

firmed reports of such an ailment but
Meir, objecting that she now was a
"private person," had forbidden the
hospital to issue bulletins on her con-
dition. She allowed only her immediate
family to visit her in recent weeks.
DEATH CAME to Israel's fourth
prime minister as this country stood on
the brink of a lasting peace with Egypt,
something that has eluded it for three
decades.
Some day peace will come, she said,
"but I doubt that I will still be here to
see it.
"One of my faults is that I cannot
deceive myself, and I do not see peace
around the corner," Meir said when she
was still caretaker prime minister after
quitting.
AS STUNNED as everyone else, Meir
lived to see the president of Egypt-her
long-time adversary-visit.Jerusalem
last Noveiber to launch direct peace
talks.
Yet she opposed the emerging peace
blueprint to the very end.
Those who saw her during the final
long illness before her death yesterday
said Meir was informed of the progress
of Egyptian-Israeli peace talks,

although she asked not to receive of-
ficial visitors in the hospital.
SHE REPORTEDLY planned to
make a strong statement against the
Camp David accords when she was
released from the hospital.
In recent months,. Meir let it be
known at party meetings that she did
not like the direction Prime Minister
Mfenachem Begin had taken in his
peace talks with Egypt. She opposed
Israel's withdrawal from all of the Sinai
Peninsula, including giving up a belt of
Sinai settlements that were built during
her five years and 78 days as prime
minister.
A year ago, however, when Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat made his
peacemaking visit to Jerusalem; his
meeting with Meir and their exchange
of jokes and small presents was one of
the warmest moments of that historic
weekend and an emotional signal that
peace was possible.
Sadat sent messages of condolence
yesterday to Israeli President Yitzhak
Navon and to Meir's family, a Sadat
spokesman said in Cairo: The
messages' contents were not disclosed.

AFRICAN QUEEN
James Agee did the screenplay, HUMPHREY BOGART won the Oscar, and
KATHERINE HEPBURN supplies the romantic interest in this enduring adventure
set on location in Africa. Bogart as a boozing-cynical riverboat captain who
rescues prim missionary Hepburn from WW I Germans is a job to watch. "We
love those two silly people on thatboat" Bogart has admitted-and it shows in
every scene. In jungle color and sound.
Sun: THE WRONG BOX & MY MAN GODFREY

JOHN HUSTON'S

1951

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 and 9:05

OLD ARCH AUD.
$1.50

AlLY EARLY BIRD MATINEES -- Adult: $1 .25
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. ti1 I:36 P.M. SUN. & HOLS. 12 Noon til 1:30 P.M.
EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25

An entertaining, yet
vacuous Pippin debuts

(Continued from Page 5)
by Benjamin Webber was, to be blunt,
;embarrassing with respect to both
pitch and cues.
The cast, too, varies widely. In the
title role, Jon Zimmerman sings quite
well, acts with verve, and dances with
heretofore undisclosed ability. Bill
Boyd as the Leading Player has his ups
and downs. Boyd moves well and sings
:rpassably, but is seriously hindered by
the often repetitious and unnecessary
movements given to him by Ganiard.
One grew tired of his repeated jump-
.kicks and step-ballchanges
(particularly during "Simple Joys").
,.In addition, it appeared that the
director and choreographer never
t

TICKET SALES
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes

really decided whether or not to have
the Leading Player engage in
continuous motion. At times Boyd slid
from position to position; at other times
he engaged in a series of unconnected
and unrelated dance steps. In all
fairness, though, it must be noted that
the opening-night audience loved him.
There are various other minor roles,
some of which are well-portrayed -
David Goldstick is notably amusing as
King Charlemagne - others of which
are not. Perhaps most important, the
chorus carries out its considerable
duties with impressive precision and
energy.
Basically, Pippin is fairly mindless
stuff, but quite enjoyable.

prior to showtifne.
2. No tickets sold later than 15

minutes

"1I

MEDIATRICS presents
THE PAPER CHASE
(James Bridges, 1973) A highly dramatic story of a first year
law student who strives for the approval of an iconoclastic
taw professor-god. He-also develops a passion for the pro-
fessor's daughter at the same time. By the end of the film;
the student, Timothy Bottoms, decides that a Harvard law
degree can only buy things-not happiness. JOHN HOUSE-
MAN won an Oscar for his role as the hard-assed prof. It's
a must for every student.

Sat., Dec. 9

Nat. Scl. Aud.
ADMISSION $1.50

7:00 & 9:00

°t
f
""^"'
:
,.".;; ":
c ".... '-
~ . .... ti

staring (Charles Delmer Brgtte I dss}, ie NdI Borgeaud Genevieve Fontanel and Leslie Caron
From Cinema 5

Angell Hall Aud. A

7:00 & 9:00

TONITE ONLY at CINEMA 11

..j

SEE Abbott & Costello Curse... SEE Mr. Spock Laugh. .
SEE Red Skeltons Cow drop a load onstage...
All this and more at
Never Before Shown Censored Scenes From Movies & T.V.!
Featuring Outtakes You'll NEVER See on Television!
1nCluding " JOHNNY CARSON * STAR TREK
ABBOTT &COSTELLO ,*BORIS KARLOFF *WC FIELDS
G RICHARD BOONE * SAMMY DAVIS. JR " JAMES ARNESS
e "'ORIGINAL" LAUGOHIN * DON RICKLES " DON ADAMS
*CRAZY COMMERCIALS * RED SKELTON " W'I LLIAM'CONRAD
*OLD TIME MOVIES * THE BEATLES *JACK BENNY

MIDNIGHT
SHOWS
FRIDAY
AND
SATURDAY
ONLY
Tickets on
sale at

I ICKeTs VO vn joie r:vv rrxi

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