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December 05, 1978 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-12-05

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i

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, December 5, 1978-Page 3

r,
FY oU S ENEWS HAPEN CALL-ArDAY
A farewell to Fleming
Outgoing University President Robben Fleming will be honored at a
reception Friday, sponsored by the University Activities Center
(UAC), and all interested students are invited to attend.The 2 p.m.
reception, which will take place in the Michigan Union's Pendleton
Room, will feature an original work by a Music.School student, as well
as performances by the Jazz Band and the Friars, according to UAC
officials. Fleming is set to leave his post in January to take over as
president of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting in Washington,
D.C
Ex 'U' V.P. plays preacher
Fromer University Vice-
President for Academic Affairs
Frank Rhodes, who assumed the
post of president at Cornell,
University in 1977, was in town
last weekend. He took on az
variety of roles, playing father of
the bride at his daughter's
wedding Saturday and preacher k
on Sunday. Rhodes delivered thei
morning sermon at Ann Arbor's
First Presbyterian Church. His'
address for the first Sunday in
Advent was entitled, "The Empty
Manger," in which he contendedy
that the image of an empty Rhodes
manger was essential in grasping
the adult Christ.
Ice skate donations
The Ann Arbor Parks and Recreation Department, together with the
Fire Department, is sponsoring a drive to collect donation ice skates
for underprivileged children and families during the Christmas
holidays. Those wishing to donate used ice skates for this cause may
drop them off at any one of the city's five fire stations. Skates can be
dropped off 24 hours a day, from now through Saturday, December 23.
Take ten
The Student Government Council SGC) voted unanimously on
December 5, 1968 to endorse a city rent strike. The strike was
sponsored by the Ann Arbor Tenant's Union, which was seeking
recognition as bargaining agent with Ann Arbo' landlords. SGC
President Mike Koeneke noted the support "clearly demonstrates"
students want "more influence and authority" in dealing with their
landlords. In 1976, SGC was replaced by the Michigan Student
Assembly. Also that day about 30 blacks took control of the campus
police office at Washington University in protest over the alleged
beating of a black student by security officers.
Happeningse
FILMS
Physiology Films-Pregnancy and Birth; Vasectomy; The
Physiology of Reproduction in the Rat, 7 p.m., N. Lee. Hall, Med. Sci.
II.
Cinema Guild - Samaurai Spy, 7,9:05 p.m., Old Arch Aud.
alternate Action - A Doll's House, 7,9 p.m., Aud. 3, MLB.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Badlands, 7, 10:20; 92 in the Shade, 8:40
p.m., Aud. A., Angell.
PERFORMANCES
Eipse Jazz-Count Basie and his Orchestra with Joe Williams, 8
p.m., Hill Aud..
Faculty Recital - Ellen Weckler, pianist, 8p.m., SM Recital Hall.
SPEAKERS
International Center - Luncheon lectures, Joel Samoff, "Current
Issues and Problems in south Africa," International Center, noon.
Environmental Studies, "self-Help Housing," 3 p.m., 1528 C. C.
Little.
1978 Zweit Lectures - Enrico Bombieri, "Ordinary Differential
Equations and Irrational Numbers," 4 p.m., 1035 Angell.
Program in Child Development, Social Policy - Evelyn Moore,
director, National Black Child Development Institute, "Political

Implications for Educating Black Children and Supporting Black
Family Life," 4 p.m., Schorling aud., SEB.
ECE/CICE - James Heaton, Process Comp. System, "Future
Trends in the (Mirco) Computer-Industry," 4 p.m., 2048 E. Eng.
MARC - Josip Matovinovic, illustrated lecture, "Plaque and
Medicine in Medieval Dalmatia, Croatia, Yugoslavia," 4 p.m., Rm.
126, Res. Col.
Great Lakes Marine Environment Seminar - Fred T. Mackenzie,
Northwestern University, "Carbonate-Seawater Reactions and
Storage of C02 in the Oceans," 4 p.m., 165 Chrysler Center.
Bioengineering - Valdimir Aleshker, "Modern Methods and
Investigations in Obstetrics," 4 p.m., 1042 e. Eng.
Science Research Program - Charles Overberger, Vice-President
for Research, 7:30 p.m., Chrysler Center.
Arch., Urban Planning - Marlene Berkoff, "Functional
Programming and Design of a Major Medical Center: The Process
and the Results," 4:30 p.m., 2104 Art, Arch. Bldg.
Inteflex Student Council - Darrell Zink, Michigan Blue Cross Blue
Shield, "Health Care Posts,". 7:30 p.m., Rackham Amph.
Society of Fellows - Horace Dverport, "Physiology at Michigan:
How It Got That Way," 8 p.m., W. Conf. Rm., Rackham.
MEETINGS
College of Engineering - faculty meeting, 3:15 p.m., Rm. 311, West
Eng.
City of Ann Arbor - Ann Arbor Economic Development
Corporation,8 p.m., Conference Rm., Fire Station.
0
Your tax dollars at work
Salt Lake City Mayor Ted Wilson has given Wisconsin Sen. William
Proxmire the "Golden Hypocrisy Award" in retaliation for the
senator's pinning a "Golden Fleece Award" on the city and a federal
agency. Proxmire said the Bureau of Outdoor recreation deserved his
award, given for alleged waste of taxpayers dollars, because it paid
for a wave-making machine for the Salt Lake City municipal
swimming pool. But Wilson says what's good for the sheep-er,
goose-is good for the gander. He said Proxmire gets his "Golden
Uxr~-ro. Ammi fnr ,'ninvincr di~i, he b 1,,v1ivrin 'Sgenatc

BLACK MALES AFFECTED DISPR OPOR TIONA TEL Y:
Suspension use to be examined
By ELEONORA DI LISCIA suspensions.

The Ann Arbor School Board has
decided to reexamine suspension
policies in the schools as a result of
prompting by the Student Advocacy
Center (SAC).
SAC is a volunteer group of parents
and others interested and concerned
with the rights of students.
According to Ruth Zweifler of SAC,
the center would like the board to
reevaluate the policy and usage of
suspensions "We question whether
suspensions are the most effective way
to alter behavior. The administration
can make more attempts to problem-
solve rather than punish."
THE REPORT presented by SAC to
the board showed that Pioneer, Huron
and Scarlett were the schools most af-
fected by suspensions. Community
High and Tappan Junior High were
among the least affected. The report
also showed that male students are
suspended much more than female and
that the percentage of blacks suspen-
ded is greater than the percentage in
the population.
According to the report, blacks, par-
ticularly black males, are more likely
to be suspended for what are called
discretionary offenses such as
harassment, threatening, disobedience,
and disrespect.
These offenses "require a subjective
judgment by the school official."
Whites, on the other hand, make up a
large proportion of the non-
discretionary offenders category which
includes drug use, smoking, fighting
and weapons.
Donna Wegryn, a member of the
School Board, said she is in favor of fur-
ther examination of suspensions. "I
don't see them as a constructive tool or
that being out of school addresses
student's needs.
Wegryn said suspension policies
would appear on an upcoming School
Board agenda.
THERE ARE differences in opinion
between various school administrators
concerning how and when to use
Look well-groomed
for the
Holidays
DASCOLA
STYLISTS
LIBERTY Off STATE ARBORLAND
S.U.-E.U. MAPLE VILLAGE

Suspensions are necessary to main-
tain order, according to Paul Meyers,
principal of Huron High School, which
has a high suspension rate.
"I think they're very necessary,"
said Meyers. "If you didn't have a
discipline policy, it would be utter
chaos. The main thing is you have to
have a good deal of supervision, things
they can and cannot do. Out of this
comes a little order."
One alternative to suspensions used
at Huron is having the offending
student pick up litter. "We give them
'alternatives when it's possible," said
Meyers.
AT COMMUNITY High, a much
smaller school with a smaller suspen-
sion rate, suspension is used as a last
possible resort - mostly in cases of

violence or drug use.
Assistant Dean Elizabeth Gray said,
"We try not to suspend. We try to talk
through things. We try to get everyone
involved to work it through. Students
have to learn to take responsibility. If
you never engage them in dialogue and
only punish that's half the process.''
According to Principal Basil Mussio
of Scarlett Jr. High, suspensions are
used "when nothing else works."
Students are given an option such as
working Saturday mornings, but if they
turn the option down, they are suspen-
ded. Suspensions are given for fighting
or complete disregard to directions in
classroom, but this is.usually handled
by phone calls or conferences with
parents, Mussio said.
At Tappan Junior High. students are

usually given work details, or parent-
conferences are held. However,
suspensions are given for "serious
bodily harm or when the student has
has warnings and is not getting the
message," said Neil Mueller, Tappan's
principal.
TAPPAN HAS a much lower rate
than Scarlett even though their student
populations are about the same size.
Mussio said this is because of differen-
ces in "the population you service.
According to Mussio, Tappan's student
population comes from upper middle
class homes where fighting and violen-
ce are considered more or less taboo.
The student body at Scarlett, however,
is from lower income families. "Their
answer is sometimes, let's fight,"
Mussio said.

UNIVERSiTi OF MICHIGAN 1978/79 OFFICIAL

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11

I.

STUDENT and FACULTY/STAFF TOUR
DECEMBER 28-JANUARY 3
SPECIAL BOWL TOUR OFFICE

UM STUDENT UNION
Main Lobby- Ticket Central Phone: 763-0070
SCHEDULE FOR SALE OF TOURSPE -
WED.-FRI. Nov. 29- Dec. 1 . ................9 AM-6PM
SAT. Dec. 2... ........................ 9 AM-3 PM UM FLINT
SUN. Dec. 3...............................Closed Classroom Office Bldg. (CROB) *H
MON.-FRI. Dec. 4-8............... ....... 9 AM-6 PM Main Floor near theatre
SALES CLOSE DECEMBER 8 December 4-10 AM-6 PM
Final documents may be picked up in the main lobby of the U-M Student Union (313) 762-3434
on December 14, 15 and 16.

-

ALES

I

UM DEARBORN
allway of Student Activities Bldg.
December 5-10 AM-6 PM
(313) 593-5540

STUDENT $439.00
BASED ON 3 OR 4 PERSONS TO A ROOM
INCLUDED TOUR FEATURES:
" Charter air transportation from Detroit to San Francisco and return
from Los Angeles including complimentary meals and soft drinks.
" Accommodations for 6 nights based on 3 and 4 persons to a room. Your
first three nights will be at the HOLIDAY INN CHINATOWN in fabulous
San Francisco, and your remaining three nights at the HYATT HOUSE
HOTEL located at the Los Angeles International Airport.
" All transfers between airports, hotels and train stations by private
motorcoach, including luggage directly to your room.
" Transportation from San Francisco to Los Angeles on Southern Pacific's
"ROSE BOWL EXPRESS" train along the magnificent California coastline.
" New Year's Eve Party-cash bar.
" Game Day Package featuring private motorcoach transportation from
your hotel to the Tournament of Roses Parade, a grandstand seat at the
parade, transportation to the game, picnic box lunch, game ticket.
transportation back to the hotel.
OPTIONAL ACCOMMODATIONS
AS FOLLOWS:
" Double Accommodations (2) ...............$32 PP addl.
" Single Accommodations (1) ............... $98 PP addl.
LAND ONLY PACKAGE ............... $214.00
(includes all tour features except air transportation)
AIR ONLY PACKAGE ................. $225.00
(limited space only) includes air transportation from Detroit to San Fran-
cisco, Los Angeles to Detroit, and transfers to from the hotels.
DOES NOT INCLUDE TRANSPORTATION FROM SAN FRANCISCO TO LOS
ANGELES

FACULTY/STAFF
BASED ON
DOUBLE OCCUPANCY
INCLUDED TOUR FEATURES:
" Charter air transportation from Detroit to San Francisco and return from
Los Angeles including complimentary meals and soft drinks.
" Accommodations for 6 nights based on two persons to a room. Your
first three nights will be at the HOLIDAY INN CHINATOWN in fabulous
San Francisco, and your remaining three nights at the HYATT HOUSE
HOTEL LOCATED AT THE Los Angeles International Airport.
" All transfers between airports, hotels and train stations by private
,motorcoach, including luggage directly to your room.
" Air transportation from San Francisco to Los Angeles on scheduled air-
lines.
" New Year's Eve Party.
* Game Day Package featuring private motorcoach transportation from
your hotel to the Tournament of Rosed Parade, a grandstand seat
at the parade. transportation to the game, picnic box lunch, game
TICKET. TRANSPORTATION BACK TO THE HOTEL.
OPTIONAL ACCOMMODATIONS
AS FOLLOWS:
" Single Accommodations (1) ............................ $98 PP addl.
" Triple Accommodations, deduct for

3rd person only.. .. $34
LAND ONLY PACKAGE ...«...........$272.00
(includes all tour features except air transportation)
AIR ONLY PACKAGE ................. $225.00
(limited space only) includes air transportation from Detroit to San Fran-
ricrn nsAnneles to Deroi, and ltransfersto from the hotels.U

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