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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 29, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY
. ~- I

,,.

Art Museum'
To Display
Arctic Work
Currently on exhibit in the
Alumni Memorial Hall is "Eskimo
Art of the Canadian Eastern Arc-
tic," which will continue through
October 11.
The exhibit was assembled by
Eskimo Art, Inc., Ann Arbor, in
cooperation with the Canadian
Handicrafts Guild and the De-
partment of Northern Affairs,
Canadian Government.
After being on display at the
University, the collection will be
circulated to museums throughout
the country .under the auspices of
the Smithsonian Institution,
'Washington, D. C.
The objects in the current exhi-
bition were made on BaffinIsland
and 'adjoining districts surround-
ing Hudson Bay in northern Can-
/ada : They represent a traditional
craft carried on through succes-
sive generations which primitive
man believed assisted him in con-
trolling his environment.
The materials include soap-
stone, amphibolite and many of
the harder stones; walrus and
narwhal ivory; various types of
bone, antler, and musk ox horn.
Simple knives made from scrap
metal and rough shaping utensils
as well as modern saws and files
are employed by the Eskimos.
"Theirs is a universal rather
than a specialized art which is
shared by the, craftsman, and the
characteristics of a particular dis-
trict may occasionally be identi-
fied by the observer faimiliar with
their work," Museum Director
Charles Sawyer commented.

Mahaia Brings Message to Audience

By MILDA GINGELL
"Have you any rivers you think
uncrossable; any mountains you
can't toil through? My God .spe-
cializes in what seems impossible
and He can do what no other
power can do."
These words sung by Mahalia
Jackson, "the world's greatest
gospel singer," also reflect the
philosophy of her life.
Miss Jackson said she is not
merely attempting to entertain,
but is trying to bring the message
of Christ to her audiences. "To
me, He's everything," she divulged.
"Sows the Seed"
"I do my part to sow the seed,"
she continued, "and many accept
it enthusiastically."
"In this confused world, we
need somebody . bigger than you'
and I, somebody we can depend
upon," the gospel singer remarked.
Although Miss Jackson once
wanted to become, a nurse, she

MAHALIA JACKSON
... enthralls audience

Rules Booklet Published;
Group Regulations Revised
(Continued from Page 1)
After functioning for one year as a colony, it can petition for
recognition as a fraternity or sorority.
In another section the whole system of chaperones for closed
social events has been made more simple. Married couples at least
26 years old and unmarried members of the faculty of the rank of
instructor or above are eligible to be chaperones.
In organized housing units with a resident director no addi-
tional chaperones would be necessary and in groups where there is
no resident director at least two chaperoning couples must be
present. Even though there are chaperones present the full responsi-
bility for seeing that University regulations are observed falls to
the officers and members of the organization.
In other areas such as those concerned with closing hours for
women students the new regulations merely brings the old booklet
up to date. These deal mainly with the calling hours for women
guests in men's residences and for the calling hours for men in
women's residences.
Also, in bringing up to date the section concerning the presence
of intoxicating beverages in student quarters the interpretation
given to it by the Joint Judic last year was included.
In this interpretation, student quarters were defined as being
University residence halls, fraternities, cooperatives, league houses
and other residences in which student groups which are recognized
by the University live. Further; the definition includes any private
room or apartment in which one or more students live who are
under 21.
As the present booklet applies pnly to student organizations
all regulations in the old booklet that pertained solely to individuals
have been deleted. This included such sections as those that dealt
with Automobile Regulations.
The present plans are for the regulations to be mimeographed
and distributed. They will be evaluated over a one year period at
which time another committee similar to the one which reviewed
the 1954 version will make the necessary alterations.

feels her rewards would have been
similar since she Is still affiliated
with God's children.
Americans 'More Expressive'
"Americans are becoming more
expressive in their religious be-
liefs now," Miss Jackson noted.
"More people attend church; re-
ligious literature is more widely
accepted now than ever before,
and most of all, they are applying
their beliefs in their everyday
life."
She seemed very happy to say
that "Catholics come to hear me
sing and invite me to their
churches. Americans are coming
to worship God as one and seem
less concerned with denomina-
tion."
Helped Humanity
Before her professional career
began with a hit . record some 20
years ago, Miss Jackson worked in
missions and revivals trying to
bring "the message" to dope ad-
dicts and alcoholics among others.
"That's the purpose of religion -
to help humanity," she empha-
sized.
The great gospel singer chooses
the songs she feels like singing
and those she thinks the audience
would like to hear.
After bringing tears to the eyes
of many in the audience, she
would break into a lively number
with the audience clapping in
time to the music.
Miss Jackson stopped in the
middle of one of her lively songs
"to show my youngsters here how
to clap with the music."
songs of this dynamic gospel sing-
The audience accepted the
er so enthusiastically that she was
obliged to sing two encores. The
final applause in the Ann Arbor
High School auditorium Saturday
must have been heard for miles
around.
Foundation
To Accept
Applications
The Danforth Foundation'of St.
Louis, Mo., invites applications for
the ninth class (1960) of Danforth
Graduate Fellows from recent
graduates planning careers in col-
lege teaching.
University President Harlan H.
Hatcher has named Prof. G. E.
Lenski of the sociology depart-
ment as the liason officer' to nom-
inate to the Danforth Foundation
two or no more than three candi-
dates for these 1960 fellowships.
The ,Foundation welcomes ap-
plicants from the areas of natural
and biological sciences, social sci-
ences, humanities and all fields of
specialization to be found in ,the
undergraduate college.
Candidates must be planning to
enter graduate school in Septem-
ber, 1960, for their first year of
graduate study.
Students with or without finan-
cial need are invited to apply.

I

DIAL NQ 2-2513

Directory
All student organizations
wishing to be listed in the Stu-
dent Directory should bring the
desired information, on a type-
written sheet of paper, to the
Student Publications Bldg., 420
Maynard, between $ a.m. and
5 p.m. daily..
No information will be ac-
cepted by phone.
U Regents
Confer Rank
Of Emeritus
The Regents have conferred
emeritus titles on 29 University
faculty members.
At Friday's meeting the Regents
expressed gratitude and extended,
to each "all the courtesies due to
emeritus members of the faculty."
Emeritus titles were conferred
on six retiring members of the en-
gineering college: John C. Brier
and Leo L. Carrick, chemical en-
gineering; Charles B. Gordy, in-
dustrial engineering; Dean E. Ho-
bart, engineering drawing; Hugh
E. Keeler, .mechanical engineer-
ing and Walter E. Lay; mechani-
cal engineering.
Receive Titles
Members of the architecture
college receiving the rank of pro-
fessor emeritus were Walter W. J.
Gores, professor emeritus of land-
scape architecture and director
emeritus of the Nichols Arbore-
tum. George G. Ross was named
associate professor emeritus of
landscape architecture.
Burke W. Shartel and Lewis M.
Simes of the. law school faculty
were declared professors emeritus
of law.
Retiring professors of several
departments in the literary 'col-
lege received the rank of profes-
sor emeritus.
Become Professors Emeritus
Emeritus titles were conferred
on Z. Clark Dickinson, of econ-
omics; William A. Paton, of ac-
counting and of economics and on
Charles F. Remer, of economics.
Verner W. Crane was named
professor emeritus of American
history; Benjamin W. Wheeler,
professor emeritus of history.
In the field of natural science,
emeritus titles were conferred on
Elizabeth C. Crosby and Bradley
M. Patten of anatomy; Felix G.
Gustafson of botany; Russell C.
Hussey, of geology; and Arthur E.
Woodhead, of zoology.
.Fred B. Wahr was declared pro-
fessor emeritus of German. Julio
Del Toro and Ermelindo A. Mer-
cado were named assistant pro-
fessors emeritus of Spanish.
Laurie E. Campbell of the
physical education and athletics
department received the rank of
education for women and profes
sor emeritus and diretor emeritus
professor emeritus of physical
in physical education.
Award Honors
Ray L. Fisher was named super-
visor emeritus in physical educa-
tion and baseball coach emeritus.
Elmer D. Mitchell received the
rank of professor emeritus of phy-
sical education and chairman
emeritus of the program of physi-
cal education for men.
Ethel A. McCormick of the Of-
fice of the Dean of Women was
named social director emeritus of
women.
and Herbert G. Watkins re-
ceived the rank of secretary and
assistant vice-president emeritus
of the University.

Russian Film
Rescheduled
The Russian-made film, "School
Days," will be reshown at 8 p.m.'
today in the Multipurpose Rm. of
the Undergrad Library.
The second showing was sched-
uled because of the overflow
crowd" attending last night's pro-
gram, William W. Kelly, of the
Audio-Visual Education Center,
explained.

By CAROL LEVENTEN
Speaking on "Chaucer as a Poet,"
Prof. C. L. Wrenn of Oxford Uni-
versity yesterday discussed his
place in the continuity of English
literature.
He emphasized the importance
of reading Chaucer's works for
their poetic, rather than historical,
qualities in this year's first Eng-
lish department lecture yesterday.
"Chaucer was one of the most
language-conscious writers," Prof.
Wrenn said, "and I would like you
to think of him in the written
tradition of English poetry." His
outlook was not that of the Ren-
aissance; he was still within the
medieval tradition, Prof. Wrenn
explained.
"When we like what he says we
point to the forward-looking
Chaucer, the man of the. Renais-
sance, but when we 'neither like
nor understand him we say he is
didactic and back in the Middle
Ages," he offered.
Moralized in Humor
Although much attention is
focused on Chaucer, the humorist,
the medieval character to which
he adhered did not object to
moralizing in its entertainment.
And there is just as much of the
"morally-edifying Chaucer whom
we ignore'as there is of the social
humori'st whom we love; the two
are one," the Oxford professor em-
phasized.
Chaucer took in simple things
that were "unexplained, unsym-
bolized, without the inner mean-
ing known," he said, "and that
attitude is just what you find -in
Old English poetry- notably in
'Beowulf'; there is a continuity in
his religious thought and his ap-
preciation of nature," Prof. Wrenn
suggested.
Qualifies Title
Since Dryden's time, Chaucer
has been called the father of
English poetry. According to Prof.
Wrenn, this should be corrected to
:read "father of early modern
English poetic diction."
"I think Chaucer has passed
some of the conventional poetic
diction of later .medieval poetry
into the English poetic tradition;
from him there is a line of con-
tinuity running through Spenser
and Milton up through the 18th
Century," he declared.
Not enough work has been done
on Chaucer as a romantic, Prof.
Wrenn suggested, referring to the
poet's "Land of magical enchant-
ment." Although Chaucer satirizes
a number of aspects of popular
and literary romances, at- times
there is evidence .that he feels a
subtle attraction to "the mys-
terious Celtic world."
Compared to Wordsworth
Chaucer was the first to bring
poetry close to conversation when
necessary, and yet keep Its poetic
value intact, Prof. Wrenn noted,
and compared this to the effect
Wordsworth announced he was
striving for in the preface to the
"Lyrical Ballads."
Prof. Wrenn emphasized the
great variation in Chaucer's style
-the deliberate use of familiar
rhetorical pattern in the prologue
to the "Canterbury Tales" as con-
trasted with the familiar, conver-
sational diction of the tales them-
selves. "In the opening of 'The
Nun's Priest's Tale," he uses the
exact speech and diction of his
time, and yet it is poetry."
"He is able to use a lyric vein,
on the other hand, and I find
him very tuneful in this," Prof.
Wrenn commented, explaining
that Chaucer, though not pro-
found in expressing the lyric

mood, could strike a more truly
lyric note when the subject ap-
pealed to him.
Dislikes Historical View
Prof. Wrenri took issue with the
current practice of reading Chau-
cer for his place in the history of
ideas, and of treating the "Canter-
bury Tales" as a "great sociologi-
cal document."
"I think Chaucer intended to be
a poet." There is no doubt that he
consciously strove after what he
calls the "art poetic," Prof. Wrenn
said.
"He is still studied for history,
and only lip service is, paid to the
meter.
"My appeal is to read him as a
poet; he thought as a poet and
tried as a poet and I think it's
only fair to give him a chance.
And he ends Troilus and Creesida

OXFORD PROFESSOR:
Wrenn Lectures on Chaucer as Poet

r r:

FAVORS
by
BUD=MOR
1103 South University
NO 2-6362

r

AHMAD JAMAL
Saturday, Oct. 3
Tickets at
BOB MARSHALL'S -DISC SHOP

i'

open evenings

with a prayer that the meter be
preserved and. the poem under-
stood whenever it is read or re-
cited," Prof. Wrenn concluded.
DIAL NO 8-6416
- ENDS TONIGHT *
ThE ONE
AND ONLY
CHARLES.
SCHAPLIN
WORLD'S GREAT
.AUONN'iC!'TUR1E
the
oldSIC D
Also "The Red BIloon"
Showsoat 7 - 9 P.M.

i

DIAL NO 2-3136

Week Day Matinees
at 1:00 and 3:56
Adults 90c
Monday Thru Thursday
One Evening Show at 8 P.M.-
Adults $T1.25

gI

SM

I

. mid
LRUREMCK

lamOFA
i~AW~flr/

I'

Civic Symphony To Rehearse
Rehearsals for the Ann Arbor held Nov. 1 in the Ann Arbor High
Civic Symphony begin this even- School auditorium. Charles Fish
ing from '7:15 to 9:30 at the Ann er of the music school will be fea-
Arbor High School. tured piano soloist.
There are still openings in the Fisher wil lplay Mozart's "Con-
orchestra for students who play certo for Piano No. 24" and Hen-
any string instrument, the bas- ry Cowell's "Symphony No. 4."
soon, French horn, trombone or~
drums. Transportation to the re- - i n s
hearsals is provided. r'a J
George C. Wilson, vice-presi-S
dent of Interlochen Music Camp,
will conduct the orchestra for the
third year.
The first public concert will be

h
-
-

tTo Perform

ALL HERE! INTACT! UNCUT!

It

ON STAGE - IN PERSON --2 NIGHTS ONLY
Direct from N.Y. and a hilarious long run at
"The Den in The Duane" in his first Theatre Engagement
"AN EVENING WITH
JACK DOUGLAS"
Former comedy writer for Jack Poor, Red Skelton, Bob Hope, Jimmy
Durante, George Gobel & others. Author of the current best-seller rock-
ing millions with laughter "MY BROTHER WAS AN ONLY CHILD."
FRIDAY, OCT. 2 and SATURDAY, OCT. 3 at 8:40 P.M. ALL SEATS
RESERVED: LIMITED NUMBER AVAILABLE. MAIL ORDERS NOW-
enclose self-addressed stamped envelope: Phone Reservations accepted,
Juniper 8-3977.
Orchestra & Smoking Section: $3.85 -3.304- 2.75 (inc. tax)
CINEMA 14-- 116 west 14 Mile Road, Clawson, Mich.
(14 Mile Road -2 miles east of Woodward Avenue)

Al

Relea edth

diktists

THUR., FRI., SAT ONLY
Opening the 1959-60 Theatre Season
THE "MUST" PLAY OF OUR TIMES
for every theatre lover and Citizen
of the free world
IAA
ANNE FRANK%
Based on the MOST ENDURING DOCUMENT OF
THE HUMAN SPIRIT from World War I1 ...
ACCLAIMED BY PROFOUNDLY MOVED audiences
throughout the world.
Three-prize winner on Broadway as'
"BEST PLAY OF THE YEAR"
"THEATRE AT ITS FINEST"
(N.Y. World Telegram)
DIAO
directed by JERRY SANDLER
Produced by ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE, INC.

/ p - -

...r

AHMAD JAMAL-Currently the nation's best-selling jazz pianist,
will demonstrate his ability at 8:30 p.m. Saturday in the Ann
Arbor High School Auditorium.

GOTHIC FILM SOCIET Y
atinouce4
170 SUBSCRIPTIONS OPEN
FOR THE 1959-60 SERIES
Oct. 5 - THE EMPEROR'S NIGHTINGALE (dir. ,by Jiri Trnka, Czech.,
1949); and LE CHIEN ANDALOU (dir. by Luis Bunuel and
Salvador Dali, France, 1929)
Oct. 26 - METROPOLIS (dir. by Fritz Lang, Germany, 1926); and
ENTR'ACTE (dir. by Rene Clair, France, 1924)
Nov. 2 - THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI (dir. by Robert Wiene,
Germany, 1919); and AUTUMN FIRE (by Herman Weinberg,
U.S.A., 1930).
Nov. 23 - BLOOD OF A POET (dir. by Jean Cocteau, France, 1931);
and NEIGHBORS (by Norman McLaren, Canada, 1954)
Dec. 14 - MILLION DOLLAR LEGS (with W. C. Fields, U.S.A., 1932);
and-SONG OF THE PRAIRIE (dir. by Jiri Trnka, Czech., 1951)
Jan. 11 - AT THE CIRCUS (with the Marx Bros., U.S.A., 1939); and
WHEN A MAN'S A PRINCE (Mack Sennett Comedy, U.S.A., c. 1916)'
Feb. 8 - THE RED INN (with Fernan el, France, 1953); and THE LOVES
OF FRANISTAN (prod. by Jules Schwerin, U.S.A., 1952)

BOX OFFICE OPEN
10:30-5:30
Call NO 8-6300

All Seats Reserved
Thurs. $1.50
Fri. & Sat. $1.65

Feb. 22 - Chaplin Shorts - THE COUNT, ONE A.M., BEHIND THE
SCREEN and THE IMMIGRANT (U.S.A., 1916-1917)
March 21 r- TEN DAYS THAT SHOOK THE WORLD (dir. by Eisenstein,
U.S.S.R., 1928); and THE BATTLE OF SAN PIETRO (dir. by
John Huston, U.S.A., 1944)
April 11 - NANOOK OF THE NORTH (dir. by Robert Flaherty, U.S.A.,
1922); and TARGET FOR TONIGHT (British documentary, 1941)
i __ % 'LVIA " UA .: LUlaeU rt'AtL rR P fv A 9 .)'

SEASON TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE

Five great theatre attractions!

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