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January 12, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Est3THE MICHIGAN DAILYTUESDAY.

TUESLIAF, "

.ndiana Halts Michigan Rally,

Wins, 77-72'

HOOSIERS CHALLENGE:
M' Swim Reign T hreatened

m t
Fred Katz, Associate Sports Editor
Slow Down and Live

(Continued from Page 1)

T1

a

ENIALBILL PERIGO, considered by many to be the Michigan
coach.with fewest reasons for a cheerful disposition, made his ap-
pearance in Yost Field House just 45 minutes before game time last.
night.
He ambled past a bench at the locker room end of the slowly-
filling arena, acknowledged the early arrivals and broke into a half-
hearted grin.
"I feel like I was sent for, couldn't come and wasn't needed after
I got there," were :his words that led to a few well-appreciated
chuckles.
Exit Mr. Perigo to the second-story room where his charges were
preparing for their likely role as sacrificial lambs to victory-starved
Indiana.
At about that time, the Hoosier coach, bushy-eyebrowed and
oft-disgruntled Branch McCracken, stood in the shadows of the end-
zone bleachers. He pulled the last shreds from a mangled cigarette
and reversed the questioning tables on this writer.
"Will Michigan slow down its offense tonight?" he asked with his
accustomed nervousness.. .
"We certainly haven't yet this year. You know Perigo is a fast
break coach," was the answer, as vague as possible.
McCracken replied only with a guttural "yeh," then walked away.
The man who could have given him a positive answer was up-
tsairs.
On the surface, one hardly would have expected such anxiety
from McCracken. Sure, his team had lost its first three Big Ten starts
after being tabbed as a co-favorite for the title with Ohio State.
But those three defeats totaled only seven points, and only two,
days earlier Indiana had battled the Buckeyes down to the final two
seconds before losing, 96-95.
It was obvious that McCracken was thinking back to his two
previous losses, when both Purdue and Northwestern successfully
slowed down the Hurryin' Hoosiers. Indiana appeared vulnerable
when forced to play someone else's game.
The fact that Michigan had had its miseries all year in compil-
ing a 2-8 record and looked destined for more of the same didn't
concern McCracken. Nor did the conservative 20-point edge Indiana
was being given enter his mind.
AS EVENTS and Perigo's strategy finally proved, every bit of the
silver-haired coach's worries were justified. It would be hard to
convince McCracken that Michigan lost by 31 to Michigan State
Saturday night.
The Wolverines executed, better than Perigo had ever dreamed,
a slow offensive pattern of play learned only the day before. In large
part it was a desperation move.
After 10 games it was obvious that Michigan didn't have the
thoroughbreds to race through 40 minutes of fast-breaking basketball.
Team speed was not present; instead the general slowness had been
a definite liability. And Michigan was far from a strong team in terms
of physical condition.
So Perigo went to the snails-pace type of play to take advantage
of his fine outside shooters.
He's found himself a new offense.
"The chances are we'll stick with this the rest of the year, if
it's as effective as it was tonight," said Perigo.
What seemed most encouraging was the quick adaptation the,
Wolverines made to a surprise Indiana defense.
"We worked over two hours on this slow break Sunday, but just
a few minutes against a zone defense: Most of the time we worked it
against the man-to-man defense we thought Indiana would use,"
Perigo explained.
If near-success can come in such a hurry-up fashion and under
the most trying of circumstances, Michigan basketball, 1959-60 ver-
sion, might yet be fun to watch.

relinquished little else. Collecting
a game-leading and personal high
of 24 points,. Farris twisted and
spun around from all areas with-
in and outside the free throw
circle. Only once did Bellamy
block his shot attempt.
On defense he was just as'fine,
limiting Bellamy to six field goals
and five free throws, despite play-
ing much of the second half with
four fouls.
Captain Terry Miller continued
to give the inspiring leadership
that has characterized his play
even when Michigan fortunes have
been at their lowest.,
The Fort Wayne, Ind. native hit
for 23, aftotal that included 10
field goals ranging in distance
from 15 to 35 feet. In addition, he
was the man who made Michigan's
new offensive system work.
Michigan was forced to over-
take the Hoosiers during almost
the entire contest after losing its
last lead, 6-5.'
Sophomore forward Dick Clark
kept the Wolverines within rea-
sonable distance in the first half
by getting all his 11 points before
the intermission.
But the uncanny Indiana hot-
shots gave little indication that
they intended to take the upstart
Wolverines seriously. Working
their fast break to the point of
devastation, the Hoosiers gradu-
ally built up a 40-29 margin, their
largest of the game, near the half
before five consecutive Michigan
points narrowed the gap.
After spotting Indiana four
quick points in the first minute of
the final period, Farris and Miller
went on their respective binges
scoring all of Michigan's next 24
points between them.
By the time they were through,
John Tidwell was set to spark the
last-ditch comeback. He did so by
sinking two free throws with 5:49
remaining to die the game at 64-
apiece.
But this knot was undone per-
m a n e n t l y as LeRoy Johnson
promptly sank one from the side.
The Hoosiers put the fracas on
ice with a stal lof their -own in the
last two-and-one-half minutes
that Michigan couldn't crack.

By HAL APPLEBAUM
Michigan swim forecast: troublea
ahead.
Although the collegiate swim
season is just under way, the pow-;
erful Michigan squad has already
discovered that this year is not
going to be a joyride like last year.
This fact was dramatically evi-
dent on Saturday when the Wol-,
verines ran head on into the
Hoosiers of Indiana in the Big Ten
Relays at Michigan State.
Coach Jim C oun n s i l m'e n 's1
Hoosiers gave Michigan, undefeat-
ed in three years, a real shock, asj
they won three of the first fourI
events and were on the verge of
pullingoff a monumental upset.
However, Michigan recovered,
winning the last five events forj
the victory, despite the thorough
scare from the Hoosiers.
Knew They Were Tough
"Before the season started we'
knew that Indiana was going to
be tough," Wolverine Coach Gus
Stager stated after the Relays,
"but now we realize how good'
they really are and what we are'
going to have to do to beat them."'
"The Relays thus showed us'
many things," Stager continued.'
"First of all, we got to see Indiana'
In action after hearing so much'
about them. They in turn showed
us how much they are out to beat
us and that nobody's going to lay
down for us just because we're the
champions."
Indiana High
"Their squad was very high, but
actually gave a strange perform-
ance," he added. "For instance,
Bill Barton swam in the back-
stroke relay for them and did an
exceptional job, even though this
is not his regular event. However,
swimming in his specialty, the in-
dividual medley, he performed be-
low par."
"Many of their other men per-
formed similarly," the Michigan
coach said.
"Of course backstroker Frank
McKinney is always outstanding
and Saturday was no exception. I
was also impressed by sophomore
freestyler Pete Sintz," Stager ad-
mitted.
"Everything now points for our
dual meet with Indiana here on
Feb. 20," the Wolverine coach
added enthusiastically.
"Despite the performance of In-
diana I was greatly impressed
with the work of Michigan State.
WCHA STANDINGS
W L T Pct.
MICHIGAN 3 1 0 .750
Denver 8 3 1 .709
Michigan Tech 7 3 0 .700
Colorado College 8 4 0 .667
North Dakota 3 4 1 .438
Minnesota. 2 7 1 .250
Michigan State 1 8 1 .150
Collegiate Hairstyles
for 1969?
Featuring:
" THE IVY CUT
" THE HOLLYWOOD
" THE NEW YORKER
" THE FLORIDA
" THE CONSERVATIVE
see our window
The .aseola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

They have a new crop of swim-
mers who are just beginning to
come through for them, they're
going to surprise a lot of people,"
Stager admitted.
"As far as our performances are
concerned, I was encouraged by
our performances on both Friday
(against Western Ontario) and on
Saturday, yet in some respects I
was discouraged," Stager critical-
ly stated.
"I was generally pleased with
the times on Friday and at the
Relays we gave many fine per-
formances, althoughsome were
below par," he said.
Four Commended
Noted for particularly good per-
formances were Captain Tony
Tashnick in the butterfly, Sopho-
more freestyler Chuck Babcock
and backstroker Alex Gaxiola,
who, strangely enough, received
his commendation for a perform-
ance in the individual medley.
"I only used Gaxiola in the in-
dividual medley because we need-
ed someone - to complete the 'B'
team and he swam the fastest leg
on the relay. I'm going to try to
work him on the individual in an
upcoming dual meet," Stager add-
ed hopefully, "I was real surprised
and pleased by his performance."

JIM COUNSILMAN
... hoosiers serve notice

E

-David Giltrow
NOT QUITE ENOUGH - Michigan center Lovell Farris (34)
stretches for a rebound in last night's - action against Indiana.
However the 6'3" Farris is unable to grab the ball as 6'7" Frank
Radovich reaches higher. The Hoosiers won 77-72 at Yost Field
House.r
Wolverine Wrestling Coach
Seeks Better Performances

Just Short
Indiana G F
Johnson 5 1-1
Radovitch 6 4-5
Bellamy 6 5-6
Wilkinson 11 1-2
Lee 0 0-0
Long 2 4-5
Hall 1 0-1
TOTALS 31 15-20

P
2
2
4
2
0
0
1
11'
P
2
1
4
3
5
15'

T
11
16
17
23
0
8
2
77
T
12
2
24
11
23
72

MICHIGAN
Tidwell
Maentz
Farris
Clark
Miller
TOTALS
Indiana
1ICHIGAN

G
5
1
8
5
10
29

F
2-2
0-0
8-10
1-1
3-3
14-16

By DAVE LYON
Associate Sports Editor
Michigan's wrestlers, having up-
set Iowa State's highly-regarded
team, are now confirmed contend-
ers in the Big Ten title scramble.
Coach Cliff Keen, whose teams
have won nine Big Ten champion-
ships, said yesterday the Wolver-
ine matmen have the potential to
come out on top when the Con-
ference teams convene here March
4-5 for the Big Ten meet.
"But we're going to have to
wrestle better than we did Satur-
day," Keen said.
He was pleased at the 14-11 vic-
tory over the Cyclones, but found
enough flaws in his men's take-
down and escape techniques to
warrant drills on them in practice
yesterday.
Keen hopes to have the matmen
in top condition for the Ohio State
dual meet at Columbus Saturday,

because it will be Michigan's last
meet until Northwestern comes
'here Jan. 30. Exams will occupy
the grapplers for the last half of
the month.
Ohio State had an 0-6 dual-
meet record last year, placing
ninth in the Conference. The
Buckeyes are not expected to im-
prove greatly over last season, but
Keen is wary.
"Two years ago we were heavily
favored over Ohio State, but we
had to come from behind to get.
a 14-14 tie:'
Defending Big Ten champion
Minnesota was surprised by Michi-
gan State, 73-59, in a quadrangu-
lar meet at Northwestern Satur-
day, and it is likely the Gophers,
with injured 147-pound veteran
Jim Riefsteck out for the season,
will be replaced at the top of the
Big Ten byr MSU, Michigan, or
sophomore-studded Iowa.

40-37-77
34-38--72

BUCKS LEAD RACE:
Iowa, Illinois, NU, Ohio State Win

Read and Use Michigan Diaily Classifieds

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By The Associated Press
IOWA CITY -- Iowa knocked
Michigan State out of a tie for the
Big Ten basketball lead last night,
breaking open a tight game with
a 16 .point. spurt just before the
half and coasting to a 92-79 vic-
tory.
MSU had a 17-10 lead midway
in the first half before the Hawk-
eyes' started hitting.
Iowa went ahead for the first
time with 3:08 left in the first
half, 30-29, when Nolden Gentry
hit a free throw.
The Hawkeyes scored 16 points
In the next three minutes and led,
46-33, going into the second half.
. * *
Illinois &1, Purdue 75
LAFAYETTE-Illinois inflicted
Purdue's first Big Ten basketball
defeat of the season last night,
SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Kansas State 54, Oklahoma St. 49
Colorado 65, Kansas 61
Missouri 69, Nebraska 61
West Virginia 94, Win. & Mary 74
Texas 72, Arkansas 66
Kentucky 68, Tulane 42
Georgia Tech 91, Mississippi 66
Tennessee 103, LSU 79
Miami (O.) 82, Xavier (O.) 74

v -f

81-75, in spite of a record 43-
point-performnance by Boilermaker
sophomore Terry Dischinger.
Illinois John Wessels and Vern
Altmeyer fouled out trying to stop
Disoringer. But balance paid off
for the Illini, left with a 2-1 Big
Ten record that matches Purdue's.
The big sophomore's total broke
the Purdue record of 36 points, set
by Carl McNulty against Indiana
in 1952.
S* .
NU 77, Wisconsin 69
MADISON - Northwestern,
powered by a balanced and ac-
curate scoring attack, outgunned
Wisconsin last night to claim its
second Big Ten basketball win of
the season, 77-69.
Four of the Wildcats hit for
double figures that kept Wiscon-
sin from being a serious contender
after the Badgers gave up a 13-9
lead at the end of six minutes of
play.
Charles Brandt and Floyd
Campbell shared scoring honors
for Northwestern with 19 and. 17
points, respectively.
* * .
OSU 109, Delaware 38
COLUMBUS - Ohio State, hit-
ting its highest score ever, wal-
loped outclassed Delaware here
last night, 109-38.
The 109 points represents a rec-

ord total for the Bucks, who con-
nected for 106 last year against
Michigan and 106 in 1953 against
Miami (Fla.).
Sub OSU forward Bobby Knight
led all scorers with 15 points.
The Buckeyes played without
their leading scorer, soph Jerry
Lucas, who was held out with an
ankle injury.
BIG TEN BASKETBALL
W L Pct.
Ohio State 2 0 1.008
Iowa 3 1 .750
Michigan State 2 1 .667
Purdue 2 1 .667
Illinois 2 1 .667
Northwestern 2 1 .667
Minnesota i12.550
Indiana 1 3 .250
MICHIGAN 0 2 .000
Wisconsin 8 4 .000

UNIVERSITY LECTURE IN JOURNALISM

CHARLES W. FERG USON
Senior Editor, The Reader's Digest

Will Speak on:
"The Case for Women in American Journalism"

Wednesday, Jan. 13, Rackham Amphitheatre
at 3 P.M.
(This advertisement paid for by the press of Michigan
through the University Press Club of Michigan)

Profile: ANTARES SKOOGLE
CANTAEoG
(This Is number one In a se- undergraduate days. "Antar- fun, met all sorts of inte
ries of interviews with distin- es was a mild mannered, even ing people (Bzzz, bzzz)
guished 'Michcigan alumni.) tempered regular guy," one of profitable too. In fact

Your Discontinued Textbooks

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Dry Cleaning
by ARMEN
The Most In Dry Cleaning

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Today we shall present Mr.
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who since his graduation from

his classmates told us.
We were fortunate enough to
be allowed a brief interview
with this outstanding exam-

money I earned enabled me to
pay the down payment on my
first globular cluster dectec-
tion set." Chuckling fondly,

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