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December 17, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.THE MICHIGAN DAILY..

THURSDAY, DECEMBER M

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17,

Iewspapers Need Press Value Overhaul,
Washington Post Editor Estabrook Says

HARVARD CRIMSON:
Scientific Research
Overcomes Humanities

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By SUSAN HERSHBERG
Scientific research grants at
Harvard have increased at a rate
disproportionately large in com-
parison to grants in the humani-
ties, the "Harvard Crimson" has
declared in a recent series of ar-
ticles.
Because of the increased pri-
vate and governmental support,
several scientists and organiza-
tions have expressed a fear that
the government will gain control
over the projects they back. How-
ever, university scientists empha-
size that they have not lost any
"large measure of authority."
Insure Freedom.
To insure its intellectual free-
dom, Harvard University does not
allow any project to be enclosed
by government secrecy and gen-
eraily does not pursue projects
proposed by the government.
There are now only two re-
search grants in the Humanities
at Harvard, both in the field of
language teaching. According to
Prof. Howard M. Jones of the
Harvard English d ep a rt me nt,
people apparently aid scientific
projects because they can see
practical results.
Give Support
Foundations that support proj-
ects in the humanities seem to
"show a great tendency to favor

the projects that make good pub-
licity releases," not necessarily the
ones of the greatest scholarly
worth, according to Prof. Reuben
A. Brower, also of their English
department.
Although humanities grants
suffer by comparison with scien-
tific grants, much optimism is felt
by those in the field of humani-
tie.s as to a future increment in
the amount of money allotted to
research in the humanities.
This money is necessary too,' as
Prof. Jones, who is also president
of the American Council of Learn-
ed Societies writes, "It requires
apparently, a higher degree of
imaginative faith to invest in the
invisible and intangible. Yet hu-
mane learning, essentially invis-
ible and intangible, is central to a
good life, a good nation, and a
good culture -- only, we take it
for granted."
DIAL NO 8-6416
NOW SHOWING

1)

SPECIAL POWERS-The University's new three-pole magnet pictured above is one of the few of its
kind in existence. It will be used by armed forces research men in the study of action of microwaves.

U' Receives Magnet

w

L'

the tri-polar magnet aligns the
crystals in one direction; straight
up.,By rotating the magnet's odd
number of poles at 120 cycles per
second, they form a resistance in
all directions but one: up.
The second and largest new
magnet is made to form a strong
yet highly accurate and control-
lable magnetic field. This magnet
is equipped with a voltage regula-
tor that will hold the magnetic
force accurate to one in 10 mil-
lion over a 10 per cent change in
input voltage.
This second magnet will be used
to determine how microwaves be-
lave in certain magnetic materi-
als and to measure the strength
of pole-seeking properties of oxy-
gen-containing magnetic ceramics
at temperatures near absolute
zero.
It will also be put to use to
measure magnetic anistrophy, or
how much force it takes to turn
the polar axis within the crystals.
The maximum power of the mag-
net is about 18,000 gauss, or a
4 tow pulling force between pole
faces.
Organization
Notices
Baha'i Student Group, meeting, dis-
cussion from "Some Answered Ques-
tions" by Abdu'l Baha, Dec. 17, 8:30
p.m., 517 Oswego. Call NO 2-3548 for
transportation.
* * *
Christian Science Organization, regu-
lar testimony meeting. Dec. 17. 7:30
p.m., Lane Hall, Fireside Rm.
Inter-Cooperative Council, Co-op
Housing Application for Spring Semes-
ter for men and women are now being
accepted. Apply Rm. 2546 SA, or
phone NO 8-6872, 9-12 or 2-5.
* *, *
Kappa Phi, Christmas dessert, Dec.
17. 7:15 p.m., meet in Residence Halls
lobbies.
Univ. Coed Horseback Riding Club,
meeting - 'Ensan picture will be tak-
en, Dec. 17. 6:50 p.m., WA.
Christmas Cards
for
last-minute
shoppers
at
Boyce Photo Co.
723 N. University
ORCH ESTRAS
by
BUD-MOR
featuring
Johnny Harberd Men of Note
Dick Tilkin Bob Elliott
Andy Anderson AlBlaser
Vic Vroom Earle Pearson
The Kingsmen Dale Seeback
plus many others
1103 S. Univ. NO 2-6362

WUS:
Donations E
Show Drop
By CAROLINE DOW
University contributions to the
World University Service are fall-
ing off drastically, Rafik Ali Khan,
student representative of the or-
ganization told the Student Gov-
ernment Council at last week's
meeting.
Last year Michigan students
contributed $232 compared to Har-
vard, Smith and Northwestern's
contributions of over $7,000 and
Western Michigan's $1,000. A ten-
tative budget of over $3 million
for this year has been set up.
Fight Ignorance
The service is dedicated to the
mutual assistance of students and
the fight against ignorance, pov-
erty, dizease, and despair in the
international community of stu-
dents and professors, Khan said.
The work of its 41 national com-
mittees is coordinated at the in-
ternational level by the General
Assembly with headquarters and
general staff in Geneva. Sponsors
of WUS in the United States in-
clude United States National Stu-
dent Association, National New-
man Club, B'nai B'rith Hillel, and
the United States Christian Coun-
cil.
Handles Lodging
WUS student lodging and hous-
ing, health, educational materials
and emergency aid. This is no
"Santa Claus" situation however.
Except in emergency situations,
groups must put up two-thirds of
the project funds to demonstrate
their need for WUS funds.
Projects for 1960 include con-
tinuance of the Algerian and Hun-
garian study scholarships, support-
ing WUS's Tuberculosis interna-
tional rest center in France and
support and construction of clinics
in the Far East and Southeast
Asia and the Middle East.
Caer plans include supporting
a revolving loan fund for South
AfV an Medical students, to care
for Algerian and Chinese refugees
in Hong Kong, Tunisia and Mor-
occo. WUS also plans to build
dormitories in Greece.
Zook Makes
Announcement
Of Appointees
Appointments of six students to
the literary college steering com-
mittee were announced yesterday
by Philip Zook, '60, chairman of
the group.
The new members are Ruth
Galanter, '63, Carolyn Hafner, '62,
Nancy Keck, '62, James Seder, '61,
Sherman Silber, '63, and Clifford
Venier, '61.
Formed about 10 years ago, the
steering committee "discusses and
evaluates college policies, holds
conferences on questions of policy
and advises the college adminis-
tration from the student stand-
point," Zook explained.

DIAL NO 2-6264

STARTING TODAY
2 ACTION FEATURES

I

* and
PHOENIX FILM STUDIO PRESETS
A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL.RELEASE
Sunday "Odds Against Tomorrow"

ALL-CAMPUS
CHRISTMAS CONCERT 3
PSERFS
FRIARS
MEN'S GLEE CLUB
U. OF M. MARCHING BAND
December 17
DiagIw
8:00 P.M.
-
COLORFUL SPECTACLES OF FUN AND DARING
* SEE 1001 WONDERFUL SOUNDS AND SIGHTSI
* 0H
rUB1APeC tU
* 0A
"Q FRESENTS A FULL LENGTH
* AWTDFAI
" THE NEARSIGHTED MISTER MACDO
j.adALDI
OIL aee*@.0e
11 owO~flM~ft

t

The Finest Christmas Yet .. . With
IMPORTED GIFTS 9
'featuring
Woodwork, screens, lamps,
trays, boxes etc.
Brass boxes, bells and trays M s,

.. ;
". J
''},..f S"A... s SL.tiv :::. ._.1 f ' j.:, .. ... :. .. ....... ...t.,._.. ' i oeeeeeaaeer$OeerrAUV ,. " ... . . ii ..... _.%1?'.!.'S

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