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December 06, 1959 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

liday Brings Cash Crop

I And Lifts Its Leafy Arms To Pray ...

For American
CHICAGO (A-Santa Claus has
long been recognized as the great-
est boon to merchandising since
the invemnion of the departmenta
store.
Now he is making his presence
felt in fields far distant from the
merrily r'nging cash' registers of
the cities. lie's added a cash crop
to the traditional production of
American farms.
New Year's
Has Double

Farmers

Meaning
By SANDRA SWIFT
Although New Year's is an oc-
casion of much gaiety, it has re-
ligious significance as well.
For members of the Roman
Catholic and Anglican churches,'
it is the day of the "Feast of the
Circumcision of Our Lord."
A practice of the Methodist
church which has now spread to
other denominations is the hold-
ing of "watch night" services to
see in the New Year.
In many European countries,
such as Spain, France, Sweden,
and the Netherlands, church at-.
tendance is common on either
New Year's Eve or Day.
Russia celebrates New Year's
(as they do all their holidays) 13
days after. the American festivity.
For. a short time in Anglo-
Saxon England, New Year's was
Dec. 25, but William the Conquer-
or ordered that Jan. 1 be celebrat-
ed. Later, however, England be-
gan its year on Mar. 25.
Having New Year's in the
spring was symbolic to the an-
cient people because the year be-
gan with the rebirth of the land
. then. The first recorded festival
of the New Year took place in
Babylon in 3000 B.C.
The autumnal equinox was
chosen as the first day of the New
Year by the Egyptians, Persians,
and Phoenicians. Later the
Greeks and ancient Romans
started their year on the winter
solstice, Dec. 21.
In September or the beginning
'of October, the Jews celebrate
their new year, Rosh Hashonah,
which begins 10 days of self-ex-
amination and repentance, cul-
minating with Yom Kippur, the
Day of Atonement.

According to a survey by the
U.S. Forest Service, more farmers
are raising Christmas trees this
year than ever before. Farmers
own about 70 per cent of the 225,-
000 acres in the United States
planted solely to Christm'as trees.
U.S. farmers grew a third of the
39 million trees - with a retail
value of about 52 million dollars-
marketed last year.
The remainder of the crop was
cut from Canadian forests/ and
U.S. public lands-federal, state
and county.
Ten years ago only 28 million
trees were sold.
The states bordering Canada,
North Dakota excluded, produce
most of our Christmas trees. Mon-
tana, the only state to report
production figures over a period of
years, in one season shipped to 31
states. Even Cuba received a sup-
ply of Montana-grown evergreens.
Under normal conditions,, Montana
can maintain an annual output of
about three million trees.
More than 12 million trees are
imported annually from Canada,
Newfoundland and Laborador.
Some tree dealers in ;he United
States own or lease forested areas
in Canada for cutting Christmas
trees.
The northeastern and middle At-
lantic states and the Pacific north-
west are the two biggest Christmas
tree producing areas in the coun-
try. But trees by the million also
are cut in the Great Lakes region
and in the South.
t The most popular trees are
Douglas fir, balsam fir, eastern
red cedar, black spruce and Scotch
pine, in that order. The Scotch
pine is a. plantation-grown tree
and not native.
Because farmers have shown in-
creasing interest in Christmas
trees, 20 states issue bulletins on
how to plant and harvest trees.
There are 12 state or regional
Christmas tree associations who
help with such items as marketing,
research and grading.
Builds. Church
At Birthplace
'The Church of the. Nativity,
built by Emperor Constantine in
330 A.D., ik the .most ancient sac-
red edifice of Christendom and is
the site of the first Christmas; a
brief inscription reads: "Here
Jesus Christ was born of the Vir-
gin Mary."

-Daily-Ted Makler
A PROCESS OF TRANSFORMATION-At first the tree stands in the forest-proud, tall, and a contrast of green branches frosted with
light snow. The tree is also unaware because it cannot realize that people will come, chop it down, and take it away from its natural
surroundings. The white snow is replaced by tinsel; brightly colored balls hang from the branches; gifts are spread beneath the tree, A
bright star gleams at the top. The tree retains its beauty by spreading joy-a joy soon forgotten when the season is over and the tree
thrown out--aged, brown and naked.

To Broadcast
Yule Shows
WUOM, the University's radio
station, will broadcast several pro-
grams appropriate for the Christ-
mas season.
The annual University Musical
Society performance of Handel's'
"Messiah" will be broadcast "live"
at 2:30 p.m. today.
The world premiere of a Christ-
mas oratorio, "Rex Pacificus," by
the Rev. Emile Martin will be
heard on "Masterworks From
France" at 9:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Dec. 22.
At 7 p.m. on Christmas Eve, a
performance of Bach's "The
Christmas Oratorio" will be heard.

Tartanfa e .
Ring bag 7.95. Capezio skimmer 10.95.
Cummerbund 5.95. All in Royal

Stewart (red) Drummond (brown

).

i-

For

I'

H"
*

.* . . .........t 2
F I ;3.~+

s Christmas
MEN'S SPORT SHIRTS. Holiday-
bright colors,festive patterns and newer-
than-new styling. Choose from lustrous
silk and cotton blends, cotton flannels
and corduroys ..
$2.98, $3.98, $4.98
MEN'S DRESS SHIRTS. Awhite
Christmas and merrier too, for no man
can have enough! All collar and cuff
styles, in broadcloths, oxfords. Wash'n'
wear fabrics too . .. ..
$3.35, $4.25, $5.00
HOSE AND TIE SET. Sure toplease
--sure to fit every man on your gift list.
Nylon stretch hose and matching embroi.
dered tie are coordinated to give an
extra touch of elegance to your man's
appearance . .......... 250
INITIALED HANDKERCHIEFS.
Large, luxurious white handkerchiefs,
hand embroidered in white or colors. A
personal touch that means so much to
every man. Gift boxed ..
3 for $1.50

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TH4!ILJAU STORE
BIRMINGHAM: MI 4.7100 * GROSSE POINTE: TU 4-7180
205 Pierce St. 6$ Kercheval
SAGINAW: PL 24797 * ANN ARBOR: NO 8-8682
109 S. J e rson 1205 S. University

,'fir lw i "i ' . it r7 il" : '. Xi " r 3 r f:fi X :R Fi3 F

By appointment,
Smanufacturers and
distributors of
THE OFFICIAL
U UNIVERSITY
SOF MICHIGAN
J CLASS RINGS
Ample stock for
Christmas Delivery
at
SBurr-Pall & Co.'I
1209 South University

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a
w '«
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---
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ver hear of a

woman with loo many
Probably not. We know we never have.
Skirts seem to be one of the things
that women never have quite enough of.
All the more reason they make wonderful
Christmas gifts. So if you have a skirt
connoisseur on your shopping list, chances are
we have the skirt or skirts that will be a
welcome addition to her collection. Come
and see ... choose from everything that's new.4

..s..r : .:

11

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