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December 02, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER

Wolverine

Cagers

Open

Season

at

Pitt

Tonight

p

ung Michigan Team Faces Panthers;
re Sophomores Make Traveling Squad

Freshman Gymnasts Team with Seniors
In Intra-Squad Meet Tonight at IM Gym

By TOM WITECKI
k youthful Michigan basketball
m will open its 1959-60 season
dght with a contest .against
tsburgh.
'ive sophomores were on the 11
n traveling squad that flew to
tsburgh at 5:00 p.m. yesterday.
hough none of them are in
ach Bill Perigo's starting line-
a, few of them may be before
night is over.
rop yearling candidates are
ward Scott Maentz and guard
3k Clark, who are r'ated as the
th and seventh men on the
dlverine squad.
rust a few weeks ago 6'3"
entz was catching passes for
mp Elliott's squad, and it has

amazed Perigo how
rugged sophomore has
changeover.
Top Shot

fast thej
made the

Clark, who is 6'1", was rated
one of the top shots 'on the fresh-
man squad last winter. Another
versatile athlete, this sophomore
is rated a top infield prospect for
the Wolverine nine this spring.
Maentz will fill in occasionally
for forward Rich Donley while
Clark is slated to spell Rich Rob-
bins in the guard slot.
Donley and Robbins earned let-
ters as sophomores last winter
when they both saw limited ac-
tion. Donley, at 6'5", will be the
tallest. player , in the Michigan
starting lineup, while the speedy

iseball Team To Train
Arizona This Spring

6'1" Robbins should add to the
Wolverines' fast break attack.
The other three starters, Terry
Miller, John Tidwell and center
Lovell Farriss, will probably play
without relief, barring injuries
and excessive fouling.
Team Captain Miller will be
playing with a taped knee and
Tidwell still feels occasional pain
in the knee he injured last winter.
However, Peirgo thinks they both
will be able to put in full-time
duty.
This twosome are the highest
scoring players returning from last
year's squad and are the key men
on the Wolverines fast break of-
fense.
More Sophs
The three remaining sopho-
mores are Dennis Robison, Steve
Schoenherr and Richard Lyons.
Perigo describes the 6'5" Robison
as a "good faker in the pivot posi-
tion, but needing more work on
defense." Schoenherr and Lyons
are both guards.
Rounding out the traveling
squad is Richard Myers, a 6'5"
junior.
Despite its overall lack of
height, Perigo seems optimistic
about the team's chances this win-
ter. He said, "This is one of the
hardest working squads I have
ever had. It is faster than last
year's team and its overall shoot-
ing is better."
However, with their lack "of re-
bounding strength it is question-
able how many times the Wolver-
ines will get a chance to exhibit
their shooting talents.

OPENER TONIGHT-John Tidwell drives in for a layup shot in
a game against Minnesota last winter. The high-scoring Junior
will be in the starting lineup for Michigan's game at Pittsburgh
tonight.
SPORT SHORTS:
Cannon, Lucas Receive
College Football Awards,

By CLIFF MARKS
Michigan's far-flung freshman
gymnasts will team with the
seniors tonight in an'intra-squad
meet against the sophomores and
juniors at 7:30: p.m. in the I-M
auxiliary gymnasium.
The nine freshmen are spread
intersectionally from Canada to
Tucson, Ariz., with only two from
Michigan. Only one of the var-
sity's nine is from the Wolverine
state.
Coach Newt Loken attributes
this lack of home grown gymnasts
to the fact that there isn't much
of a high school gym program in
the state of Michigan as yet.
Participation Increases
"However, the past four or five
years has seen a great increase in
gym participation here in. Mich-
igan," Loken said, "and another
few years should see more gym-
nasts here from the home state."
The three Michigan boys now
on the squad, frosh John Buss
from Ann Arbor and Lewis Fenner
from Port Huron, and junior Tom
Francis from Birmingham were
products of this recent upsurge.
As for the other seven fresh-
men, four of whom are from Can-
ada, Loken said that his recruit-
ing policy is a combination of
various factors.
"I usually manage to see a few
.high school meets every year, in-
cluding Canadian ones, and the
Chicago Invitational (two frosh
are from the Chicago area) and
that's where I see a lot of the
boys. I also get letters from in-

t e r e s t e d people, usually high
school coaches, about prospects,
Numerous Frosh
Loken ranks this year's fresh-
man team one of his best, "as a
group." "The fact that there are
nine of them, instead of the usual
two or three is outstanding in it-
self," the coach said.
Tonight's meet, the second in-
tra-squad affair, will feature the
freshmen, who lost to the varsity

earlier, 75-34, in their respective
events.
Competing will be Gil LaRose,
Jim ,Hynds and Bob Harris in the
all-around event; Buss and Bary
Spicer in the free exercise and
tumbling; Fenner and Jim Sprow
in the side horse; Mark Ernberg
on the trampoline, and Norm Sak-
amoto, another tumbler.
The meet will be the varsity's
final tuneup before Saturday's
Midwest Open at Chicago.

w

Swim Gala Rescheduled
For Saturday,_Dc.12

.8

4

At least ten and probably 12
ames will keep Michigan's var-
lty basebaliers busy during an in-
mnsive eight-day training "session
i Arizona this spring.
The move, announced yester-
ay, is a departu're from the Wol-
erines' usual journey to Florida.
"In scheduling 10 to 12 games,
e can be sure of getting them all
z with the terrific weather out
here," explained Freshman Coach
[oby Benedict. "Rain in Florida
mited us to seven games there
st year."
Improved conditioning is ex-

pected to be the major benefit of
the change in training sites.
"Naturally, the more games you
can get under your belts, before
the season starts, the better shape
the ballplayers will be in," Bene-
dict said.
Wyoming, Arizona and Arizona
State will form the Wolverines'
opposition in games at Tucson
and Tempe.
Tentative plans are for the team
to leave the Thursday night pre-
ceding'the beginning of spring va-
cation:and to return the Saturday
beford classes resume.

The 25th Annual Michigan"
Swim Gala, originally scheduled
for December 5, has been resched-
uled for Saturday, December 12,
because of conflicts with home
basketball and hockey games.
The Gala, presented by Gus
Stager and his NCAA Champion
swimming team and diving coach
Dick Kimball and the Michigan
diving team, is a show complete
with brilliant competition, swim-
ming and hilarious comedy.
Coach Stager will send his squad
against the best swimmers in the
Mid-West in the Michigan AAU
championships. The preliminaries
start at. 11:00 a.m. with some of
the finals slated at 4:00 p.m. and
the others as part of the evening
show.
The divers will compete in the

one meter championships at 3:00
p.m. and will present an exhibition
of three meter and platform div-
ing in the evening.
However in the evening the
swimmers and divers also turn to
comedy. The hilarious stunts
pulled by the divers from the plat-
form last year drew raves from the
full house that packed. they Varsity'
Pool bleachers.
The tickets are priced at $1.00
general admission and $.60 for
students. One, ticket admits the
holder to all events and the eve-
ning show.
NBA Scores
Minneapolis 103, New York 100
St. Louis 106, Syraeuse 101

_a..

{'

By The Associated Press

NEW YORK - Billy Cannon,
Louisiana State's hard - running
halfback with a flair for climactic
performances, yesterday was
named winner of the Heisman
Trophy as the best college foot-
ball player of the year.
The trophy committee an-
nounced that the 6'-2", 210-pound
all-purpose star was picked by a

SUCCESSFUL ROAD TRIP:
M' leers Display Balanced Attack

By MIKE GILLMAN
Michigan's Wolverines came out
f 'last week's road trip in fine
tyle, taking three games in four
tarts and showing the best bal-
rnced scoring attack in recent
ears.
On the swing through the East,
dichigan averaged six goals a
Robertson,
WestStar
[n Opener s
By The Associated Press 5
The college basketball season
pened last night by taking up
vhere it left off last year.
Leading the parade of last
ear's top college teams who con-
inued to win was West Virginia.
'he Mountaineers beat Tennessee
3-78 with All-American Jerry
Nest scoring 21points and col
ecting 22 rebounds.
Two time All-American Oscar
Robertson, with 45 points, led
incinnati to a 107-62 victory over
ndiana State.
, Last year's Big Eight cham-
ions, Kansas State beat South
)akota State, 85-52.
Molt of the Big Ten teams
nade successful -debuts. Purdue
utclasoed Valparaiso, 70-57. Ohio
State edged Wake Forest, 77-69.
rorthwestern vanquished West-
mi Michigan, 80-66. Wisconsin
ell 88-82 to Butler.
Detroit's great sophomores beat
assumption, 106-50.

game, but the most pleasing aspect
of the scoring to coach Al Ren-
frew, was the fact that all three
lines showed punch, each line tak-
ing the major share of the glory
in one of the three wins.
The only problem arising out of
the trip was the loss of Carl White
for four weeks with a broken
thumb suffered in the Clarkson
contest.
'Shut Out
The Wolverines started their
season off with a bang, as they
whitewashed St. Lawrence in their
first of two meetings, 6-0.
Fully recovered from a rocky
plane ride, the Michigan squad
showed a balanced attack, out-
shooting the Larries in every
stanza and scoring in each frame.
The sophomore line of Al Hin-
negan, Jerry Kolb and Joe Lung-
hammer produced half of the eve-
ning's output.,
The ice was broken in a fairly
even first period when Gary Matt-
son, firing from the corner, car-
omed a shot off the shoulder of
the St. Lawrence goalie.
In the second stanza, the Wol-
verines really poured it on and
tallied three goals as Michigan
goalie Jim Coyle had only eight
saves to make on his way to his
first shutout since his junior
hockey days.
Breakaway
Steve Bochen, Lunghammer and
Pat Cushing scored in this period.
Cushing's breakaway after a pass
from Dale MacDonald, was the
backbreaker for the St. Lawrence
team.
Early in the last frame, the Wol-
verines got a chance to practice
their power play as a penalty put
the Larries shorthanded. It took
only 46 seconds for Michigan to

cash in, as sharp passing'in close
finally gave Kolb an opening and
he took it for his first goal in a
Michigan uniform.
Lunghammer dented the net for
the second time of the evening at
8:40 of the last period to round
out the rout of St. Lawrence.
Coyle Stars
In the second game, played at
Clarkston, the Wolverines kept
pouring goals into the nets and
Jim C'oyle kept the opposition's
shots out as Michigan racked up
its second shutout in two nights,
8-0.
This was the night for the "yel-
low line," Bill Kelley, MacDonald
and Cushing, to shine. Kelley and
MacDonald each dumped in a pair,
of goals into the Clarkson nets
and Cushing got three assists for
his evening's work.
White, Mattson, Hinnegan and
Watt each lit the red light once
to fill out the scoring.
Penalties Hurt
Coyle had his work cut out for
him in the dying seconds of the
game, as the Wolverines were short
two men because of penalties. But
the defensemen gave him beauti-
ful cover and cleared the puck four
times in the last minute and a half
to stretch his unscored upon
streak to 120 minutes.
Returning to Canton to face St.
Lawrence on Saturday, the Wol-
verines ran into an entirely dif-
ferent club. The fired-up Larries
outskated a tired Michigan squad
throughout most of the game.
Watt counted the first goal of
the evening, but St. Lawrence took
advantage of the fact that Michi-
gan was playing its third game in
three nights and played a race-
horse brand of hockey, scoring

three times in both the first and
third periods.
The Wolverines came to life in
the last frame and almost pulled
it out of the fire. Trailing 4-2, they
knotted the score only to have the
Larries score two more quick goals
on breakaways.
With two minutes left, Bochen
tallied to bring the Wolverines to
within one goal, but the clock ran
out with Michigan trying vainly
to catch up.
Still smarting over the loss to
St. Lawrence, Michigan ended its
road trip by methodically taking,
apart Toronto, 5-1.
This weekend's twin bill with
Colorado should give Michigan
fans a cliance to see how the Wol-
verines will fare in the tougher
Western Collegiate Hockey Asso-
ciation.

substantial margin over his clos-
est rivals -quarterbacks Richie
Lucas of Penn State and Don
Meredith of Southern Methodist.
* * .
PHILADELPHIA-The Maxwell
Memorial Football Club announced
yesterday that quarterback Richie
Lucas of Penn State has been
selected to receive its trophy as the
outstanding college player of 1959.
Lucas, of Glassport, Pa., an All-
America candidate, guided Penn
State to an 8-2 record and a berth
in the new Liberty Bowl in Phila-
delphia December 19. Army All-
America halfback Pete Dawkins
won the award last year.
* * *
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.-Bobby
Thomson. the man who hit the
pennant winning homer for the
19b1 "miracle" New York Giants,
yesterday was traded by the Chi-
cago Cubs to the Boston Red Sox
for right handed pitcher Al
Schroll, as the new inter-league
swap rule stirred up more base-
ball business.
The deal was the second between
the two clubs since the new trade
rule became effective Nov. 21.
Earlier, the Red pox shipped first
baseman Dick Gernert to the Cubs
for pitcher Dave Hillman and first
baseman Jim Marshall.
PHILADELPHIA - A puzzled
Steve Sebo was fired as Penn foot-
ball coach yesterday and Rutger's
John Stiegman named to succeed
him.,

His Christmas s o
The No. I n the nation-
Jantzen Canadiens.
This four-button wool cardigan is 7
the newest and most wanted (
sportswear of the season. Your
man will appreciate your thought-
fulness in choosing this gift. See
, *M. the new colors. $15.95
R Tye ' Other cardigans from $9.95
"Open Friday and Monday
evenings until 8:30"
607 E. LIBERTY-Next to Michigan Theatre

};

Detroit Selects Harper
In Pro Football Draft

3
1

Michigan left halfback Darrell
was "very surprised" at son with a 41-yard average. He
Harper wsvrsurse athis also place - kicked seven extra
selection by the Detroit Lions inapoinsand -kiedgs;
the. National Football League play- points and two field goals.
e drata FPhilaliageterday- The Lions, although having an
er draft at Philadelphia yesterday. established punter in defensive
"I would be very interested in halfback Yale Lary, have been
accepting an offer - if there is hurting for an accomplished field
one," said Harper, the only Michi- goal kicker this season.
gan player drafted so far. If Harper survives the training
Harper, notified of his selection camp next summer, he will join
by telegram yesterday, was the Michigan alumnus Terry Barr on
Big Ten's leading punter this sea- the Detroit pro squad.
-

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CHRISTMASTI DE"

.'s got the look
ey like!

.I

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'

°' .:'
°' <

]Formal time is here
The After Six PLAYBOY is the
All-American Campus favorite.
Excellent style, good fitting
characteristics'and popularly
priced at $45.

THE MAN WHO
CARES

a

r' .r......
s
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His shirts must be just so.
He tolerates no wrinkles, no limp collar with
curling points.
His shirts must be crisp, sparkling clean.
He demands perfection.
He is assured of that perfection when his shirts

"IVY"
bY Afterr
It's the "Playboy," with that
natural "Ivy" look... natural
shoulders, slender lines,
unpleated trousers. It's the
"casual" look of luxury!
This is the look and feeling of
comfort you'll like, too! In very
lightweight Dacron*-Rayon.
Black-of course!

go to Kyer's, because Kyer's inspectors pass

III

SI1

1/ff

I

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