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September 23, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A

_TE_.MCIGAN _DAILY~

AY,

PUS ORGANIZATIONS:
eligious Centers Start,
rograms of Worship

By MILDA GINGELL
With the beginning of classes,
e religious centers on campus
so begin their programs of wor-
ip, instruction, discussion, and
llowship.
"Guild' House" is the meeting
ace for students of the. Congre-
,tional, Evangelical and Re-
rmed, and Disciples of Christ
iurches. This association meets
SSunday evenings at Bethlehem
aurch.
Catholic students are bonded to-
ther i an organization known
the Newman Club. Classes such
Christian morals and church
story, as well as parties and
nces "arenheld in the Father
#chard Center.°
The Campus Chapel, sponsored
U' Alunus
aumes Editor
'or Ma gazine
Norman S. Mangouni became
anaging editor of the Michigan
lumnus magazine Saturday.
Announcement of his appoint-
.ent came from John E. Tirrell,
mneral secretary of the University
lumni Association and editor-
-chief of the magazine. Man-
mini, who received his bachelor
arts degree and journalism
,rtificate here in 1954, replaces
arold M. Wilson.
Resignation from the editor-
ip. will allow Wilson to spend
rore time as Class Officers Coun-
1 secretary developing more
.umni groups Within the Uni-
rsity's schools and colleges, Tir-
l1 explained. He will continue
serve the magazine as contri-
ating editor.
Mangouni is currently a copy
litor for the Ann Arbor News
here he has 'also written sports
ad farm and county news since
D57. He first worked for the paper
the summer of 1954, before en-
ring Columbia University gradu-
e school.
U' Schedules
xamination
n anguages
Doctoral degree candidates must
ke a preliminary spreening ex-
mination in foreign languages
o 3:05 P.m. Mon. in Aud. C
rAngelI :hall.
Prof. "Leta Jane Lewis, newly
pointed foreign languageexam-
er for graduate students, has
mAounced that candidates must
ass the preliminary, obective4
'r" examination before ichedul-
i the-main test.
The~ foreign language examina-
on is ordinarily required in eith-
Yrench or German of all candi
aes foe the doctoral degree. The
axt screening test will not be
heduled for another month,
rof. Lewis said..
Candidates aould call the Uni-
rsity, extension 309 if they plan
.take the preliminary examina-
on..
Prof. Lewis succeeded Prof.
irsch Hootkins, former language
%aminer, who retired July 1.
Ensian Wants
>hotographers
Student -photographers inter-
ted' in working on the Ensia
uould attend the first meeting of
ie semester at 7:30 p.m. today in
ie Esian editorial office, photo-
'aphy- edito Dave Giltrow, '61ie,
as announced.

"Experience is helpful but not
quired. The darkroom work is
one by a paid technician," Gil-
,ow explained.
~This permits a maximum
mount of time for taking quality
ctures as well as studying for
ams," he added.

by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan, attempts to
delve into the varied facets of the
Bible. A 10 a.m. and a 7 p.m. wor-
ship service is held every Sunday.
Fellowship and spiritual growth
are offered by the American Bap-
tist Student Group, while South-
ern Baptists may offer devotion
or find friendship at the Baptist
Student Union which meets the
first Sunday of each month at 9
p.m. at Lane Hall.
Offers Suppers
Presbyterian Student Fellowship
offers suppers and programs Sun-
day evenings for members of the
Presbyterian Church.
The Inter-Varsity Christian Fel-
lowship enables students to re-
examine what they believe and to
look deeper to find a principle up-
on which to base their lives. It is
not 'affiliated with any church.
All students are invited to the
Wesley Student Fellowship, the
campus organiaztion of the Meth-
odist Church, and the Evangelical
United Brethren invites students
to the Stamm Foundation.
Tries Solving Problems
Grace Bible Church attempts to
relate the ancient faith to modern
everyday experience along with
trying to solve the problems en-
countered in student life.
The Ann Arbor Mennonite Fel-
lowship presents a variety of
meetings at 7 p.m. Sundays in
Lane Hall.
Young Friends Fellowship meets
Sunday evenings to discuss cur-
rent national and international
problems ' as related to religious
thought.
Stresses Allegiance
Allegiance to God in every as-
pect of life seven days a week is
the idea stressed by the Christian
Reformed Church.
Episcopal students are aided in
their worship and fellowship
through St. Andrew's Church and
Canterbury House.
The Lutheran Church-Missouri
Synod holds several Sunday serv-
ices as well as sponsoring Gamma
Delta, the student organization.
"Your home away from home"
can be the Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter Day Saints.
Assists Students
Assisting students with prob-
lems and discussions is only one
of the many functions of the Lu-
theran Student Center and
Chapel, the local unit of the Na-
tional Lutheran Council.
The Moslem Religious A
tion encourages Muslim students.
to think of Islam. as a way of life.
Lecturers and representatives of
this and many other faiths are
brought to campus to enrich and
enlighten the lives of all the
students.
Meet at Lane Hall
Christian Science meetings are
held :Thursday evenings at ane'
Hall.
For those students whose reli-
gious interests are naturalistic
and humanistic, there is the Uni-
tarian Student Group.
TheEastern Orthodox Student
Society offers worship, study and
social affairs to students of the
Orthodox faiths.
Teachings of the Baha'i Faith
and other world religions are dis-
cussed at the Baha'i Student
Group.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation.
"the campus within a campus,"
offers an immense number of serv-
ices and facilities to students of
the Jewish faith.

GOSPEL SINGER-Mahalia Jackson, billed as having "the great-
est Jazz voice since Bessie Smith. will make her first local ap-
pearance at Ann Arbor High School at 8:30 p.m. Saturday. Miss
Jackson concentrates on spirituals.
'Great est azvoice'
Refuses To Sing Blues

PEACE GROUP:
Statement
Urges UN
Affiliation.
The United Nations should en-
courage all regimes exercising
governing -power, including Com-
munist China, to assume the ob-
ligations and take part in the ac-
tivities involved in UN member-
ship, a research commission re-
port has averred.
Prof. Inis L. Claude Jr. of the
University political science de-
partment served as chairman of
the committee drafting this re-
port of the Commission to Study
the Organization of Peace.
The report recognizes the ag-
gressive tendencies of the Chinese
Communists, but suggests that
thesem canbe better handled if the
mainland regime is represented
within the organization.
Titled "Organzng Peace in the
Nuclear Age," the ' report reads:.
"Doubts concerning the Commu-
nist government's prospective obe-
dience to the obligations of UN
membership strengthen , rather
than -weaken the case for partici-
pation; lawbreakers are the last
persons to whom one should grant
even the semblance of exemption
from the law.
"Refusal to recognize the (Chi-
nese Communists) as the agency l
responsible for the participation
of mainland China in the UN
weakens the case for regarding
that regime as bound by the (UN),
Charter," it continues.
The report also suggests that
the U.S. make the International
Atomic Energy Agency the focal
point for development of peace-
ful atomic energy uses, in other
countries. The value of the UN
for promoting peace depends on
the, use to which it is put by
statesmen, the report states.
+ r.
City'~ss Play
To Audiio
Auditions for the Ann Arbor'
Civic Theatre production of Noel
Coward's "Nude with Violin" will
take place in Rm. C104 of Ann
Arbor High School today from 7:30
to 10:00 p.m.
"Nude with Violin," in which the:
author starred on Broadway, is a
comic satire on modern art. Audi-
tions are open to University stu-
dents as, well as to Ann Arbor resi-
dents.

Economic
Conference
To Convene
The University's seventh an-
nual conference on the Economic
Outlook will concentrate atten-_
tion on effects of taxation on eco-
nomic growth when it meets here
Nov. 12-13.
The two days will be filled with
talks to be held in Rackhain Am-
phitheatre by professors and eco-
nomists and a dinner scheduled
for Thursday at the Union.
Local Group
To Present
Five Play
The Ann Arbor Civic Theatre will
present five plays this season,
Charles Chadwick, president, said
recently.
"The Diary of Anne Frank," by
Frances Goodrich and Albert Hac-
kett, winner of the 1956. Pulitzer
Prize, Antionette Perry Award and
the Drama Critics Circle Award,
will be presented Oct. 1-3. It will
be directed by Jerry Sandler.
Noel Coward's "Nude with Vio-
lin," which will appear Nov. 5
through 7, will be directed by pill
Taylor. Coward starred in the
comic satire, of modern art on
Broadway.
The recently revived "Major
Barbara" by George Bernard Shaw
will be presented Jan. 14-16, with
Jerry Sandler directing.
"A Streetcar Named Desire,"
Tennessee Williams' Pulitzer Prize
Drama, will be directed by Ted
Heusel and presented Feb. 18
through 20.
The season's last production, a
musical comedy, will be announced
at a later date. It will be presented
April 14 through 16.
Individual tickets, all reserved,
are $1.50 for Thursday evening,
and $1.75 for Friday or Saturday;
season tickets are $6.00 for Thurs-
day and $7.00 for Friday and Sat-
urday. All the plays are performed
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.

Look For

NEXT WEEK

I.

ENDS
THURSDAY

DIAL
NO 2-25

This is your story as Paddy Chayefsky
listened to it with sympathy and set
it down with boldness.
Here is the motion picture that says it all-
with all the "Stops!" out!

COL M MIA PICTUMSprmnft'

KIM
NOVAK

FREDRIC
MARCH

ONE OF THE MOST ACCLAIMED DRAM
OF THE DECADE
to open the 1959-60 theatre season
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

FRIDAY: "THE DEVIL'S DISCIPLE"

SPECIAL
ENGAGEMENT
STARTING
TODAY

ll 1l i ","'h
Emil t i ~ i
Illnntlllli, m

DIAL
NO 8-6416

"Anybody that sings the bluesv
is in a deep pit yelling for help,
and I'm simply not in that kind
of a position," Mahalia Jackson
insists.
- The gospel singer, who grew up
in New Orleans and is billed as
having "the greatest jazz voice
sincc Bessie Smith" has rejected
the New Orleans heritage of jazz-
GrantsOen
TloFaculty
University faculty m e m b e r s.
teaching graduate work may now
apply for three types of research
grants.I
Application for graduate re-
search funds must be filed by Oct.
8. Papers are available in Rm. 118
of the Rackham Bldg.
Proposals for 1960 Summer
F a c u 1 t y Research Fellowships
must be entered by Oct. 1 in the
Graduate School Office, where ap-
plications are available.
The Phoenix Project is prepar-
ing additional grants, for which
application is also due Oct. 8.
Blanks may be obtained at the
Project Office, 3034 Rackham
Bldg.

aad blues, refusing' to sing them
or to perform in night clubs.
Miss Jackson concentrates on
spirituals. Critics note her ability.
"to communicate an honest emo-.
tional experience;" she sees the
gospel songs as an affirmation of
her own religious enthusiasm.
Uses Phonograph
Her only musical training came
from a neighbor's phonograph, on'
which she heard and studied the
voices of blues artists: her fath-
er, a part-time stevedore, part-
time barber and part-time Baptist
clergyman, allowed only sacred
music in his home.
She began singing in a church
choir when she was five years old,
and soon became a local attrac-
tion: later, in New Orleans and
Chicago, she worked as a laun-
dress, baby-sitter and maid hop-
ing eventually to become a nurse.
While in Chicago, a choir di-
rector featured her in a Gospel
quintet,and here began her pro-
fessional singing career.
Sings Spirituals
Miss Jackson sings her spirituals
in a free-swinging manner, giving
them as proof of her own "hope,
happiness and joy."
She :will' make hier first local
appearance at Ann Arbor High
School at 8:30 p.m. Saturday.
Tickets are available at local book
and record stores.

THE ONE,
AND ONLY
CH, APLIN
WORLD'S GREAT
LAUGHING PICTURE
I MUCANDwRD
Written, Directed and Produced by CHARIES CHAPLIN-Distributed by Lopert Fitms,inc.
subscribe to'

HOLD,

ON

The Michigan Daily

I

U

,+
DIAL Nt) 2_ 1 !

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

INTACT!
UNCUT!

PLATFORM ATTRACTIONS

1959-1960

HILL AUDITORIUM

i ii

VA.

1

Distinguished Celebrities

Dramatic Entertainment

Piodumedby Dmted by ScreenIy by f
PAUL OSBORN cL
BUDDY AD[ER IOSIIA LOGAN A MAGNA Prodiwtioin u >~
Week Day Matinees Monday Thru Thursday
at 1:00 and 3:56 One Evening Show at 8 P.M.
Adults 90c Adults $1.25

I

I

GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY
. hhi'Urce4
200 SUBSCRIPTIONS OPEN

FOR THE 1959-60 SERIES
Oct. 5 - THE EMPEROR'S NIGHTINGALE (dir. by Jiri Trnka, Czech.,
1949); and LE CHIEN ANDALOU (dir, by Luis Bunuel and
Salvador Dali, France, 1929)
Oct. 26 - METROPOLIS (dir.by Fritz Lang, Germany, 1926); and
ENTR'ACTE (dir. by Rene Clair, France, 1924)
Nov. 2 - THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI (dir. by Robert Wiene,
Germany, 1919); and AUTUMN FIRE (by Herman Weinberg,
U.S.A., 1930).
Nov. 23 - BLOOD OF A POET (dir. by Jean Cocteau, France, 1931);
and NEIGHBORS (by Norman McLaren, Canada, 1954)
Dec. 14-- MILLION DOLLAR LEGS (with W. C. Fields, U.S.A., 1932);
and SONG OF THE PRAIRIE (dir. by Jiri Trnka, Czech., 1951)

JULIEN BRYAN-Oct. 22
Presenting his latest dramatic movie "POLAND THEN AND NOW"
BETTE DAVISland GARY MERRILL-Nov.19
with William Wintersole and guitarist Clark Allen
In the brilliant stage presentation, "THE WORLD OF CARL SANDBURG"
SIR DONALD WOLFIT and ROSALIND IDEN-Jan. 9
Noted English Shakespearean actors in costume show, "SCENES FROM SHAKESPEARE"
JOYCE GRENFELL - Feb.12
England's most engaging comedienne in her popular one-woman show
"AN EVENING WITH JOYCE GRENFELL"
HAL HOLBROOK-Feb. 27
In his Broadway hit one-man show, "MARK TWAIN TONIGHT!"
A SIXTH ATTRACTION TO BE ANNOUNCED LATER
SEASON TICKETS ON SALE TODAY 10 A.M. - Prices: $8.50 and $7.50 (Reserved Sections)

i

Jan. 11 - AT THE CIRCUS' (with the Marx Bros., U.S.A., 1939); and
WHEN A MAN'S A PRINCE (Mack Sennett Comedy, U.S.A., c. 1916)
Feb. 8 - THE RED INN (with Fernandel, France, 1953); and THE LOVES
OF FRANISTAN (prod. by Jules Schwerin, U.S.A., 1952)
Feb. 22 - Chaplin Shorts --THE COUNT, ONE A.M., BEHIND THE
SCREEN and THE IMMIGRANT (U.S.A., 1916-1917)
March 21 - TEN DAYS THAT SHOOK THE WORLD (dir. by Eisenstein,
U.S.S.R., 1928); and THE BATTLE OF SAN PIETRO (dir, by
John Huston, U.S.A., 1944)
April 11 - NANKOOK OF THE NORTH (dir. by Robert Flaherty, U.S.A.,
1922) * , n TAREtT FR TOAIrGH:lT (ritishL -..... , 1941

1

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ollege man should be without atdur-
plastic, TENT FOR TWO! Perfect for
:ball games, etc. Whenever storm.
ids gather, you and your date huddle

11ON

II

I

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