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November 14, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY.

THE MCHIGN DALY ATTRDY {r

ViLL C11 lrL T L' lIL L' n lY j J
1

iehigan,

Indiana

Meet

Today
Hosts Given
Slight Edge,
(Continued from Page 1)

cOME TO c HUIJcH
O THE SABBTH

back Stan Noskin will have an-
other good day playing on opposi-
tion soil. His best performances
this fall have come in the away
games against Minnesota and Illi-
nois.
On defense the Wolverines will
be up against a single wing offen-
sive formation for the second time
this fall. The first encounter
proved to be a successful one,
with Michigan winning over Ore-
gon State 19-7.
Key men in the Hoosier offense
are tailbacks Ted Smith and John
Henry Jackson. Smith, the In-
diana Captain, and Jackson, just
a sophomore, have been successful
all season with their passing from
the tailback slot.
Michigan will also have to keep
its eyes open for quick kicks as
both Smith and Jackson have let
loose on second and third down
punts several times this fall.
As if some what of a tradition,
bad weather played a big part in
last year's game at the Michigan
Stadium when the Hoosiers edged
the Wolverines, 8-6 In a muddy
battle.
| Today's Lineups

"O come, let us worship and bow dowri; let us
kneel before the Lord our maker." Psalm 96, 6.

HERE'S HOW-Darrell Harper (41) is caught in the act as he booms a punt downfield against Illinois. At the right he has received
the snap from center, in the middle picture he has just dropped the ball and is about to bring his right foot up through the ball. At
the left the ball is seen on its way downfield. Harper is one of the nation's top punters with a 41.3 yard average.

STANDPOINT
D aye Lyon, Associate Sports Editor
X An Unconunon Visit
Michigan, though listed as a slim underdog in its game at Indiana
today, must win to"uphold-tradition.
The Wolverines have never been beaten at Bloomington.
This is-not saying a whole lot, since Michigan has only played
one game there in the 25-game series which dates from 1900.
Indiana hosted the 1932 encounter and lost, 7-0, to a Michigan team
that swept through eight games that season on its way to a Big Ten
and national championship. Coach Harry Kipke's eleven allowed only
13 points to be sdored against it during that season, and the victory
over Indiana was just one of six shutouts.
Today's game is thus only the second football appearance for
Michigan at Bloomington and its 35,325-seat Memorial Stadium. The
Hoosiers have been content throughout the rest of the Michigan
series to play at Ann Arbor's commodious arena, where they have
drawn an average attendance about double that of their own sta-
dium's capacity.
Customers mean money, of course, and since both schools split
gate receipts equally, both take a financial beating if they play in
Bloomington's small horseshoe. (They did in 1932. Attendance was
10,440.) So they play here.
Why are they passing up financial benefits to play at Indiana this
year?
When schedules were being drawn up for the 1959 season a few
'years back, Indiana was preparing to construct a new open-at-both-
ends 47,000-seat structure to replace Memorial Stadium, the oldest
(1911) and smallest football stadium in the Big Ten. The new facility
was slated for completion in time for the 1959 season, and Michigan
was invited to come to Bloomington to-play in the stadium's dedica-
tion game.
So the game was' scheduled with that understanding. But wet
weather and labor troubles caused construction of the new stadium
to lag well behind schedule. When it became known that it would
not be ready in time, it was too late to have the game switched back
to Ann Arbor.
Thus today's contest is being played at 48-year-old Memorial
Stadium. The game with Purdue next week will be the last in that
place, since the new facility, located a half-mile north of Memorial,
will definitely be ready next year. Despite the fact that a good-
drawing team (Michigan) is 'playing at Indiana's homecoming,
Memorial Stadium today will not be filled to its limited capacity. Only
about 30,000 fans are expected to be on hand.
But even that crowd will be the largest in some time to attend
an Indiana home game.
One wonders why Indiana should go to the expense of replacing
a stadium that is more than adequate to handle the home-game
crowds.-
Apparently, Indiana believes it is time to retire the old structure,
before it collapses, on the basis of age. But that's not the whole
,answer.
It is a time of optimism at Indiana, and this partly accounts for
the decision to build a new football arena. The Hoosiers have never
drawn well because Indiana is not primarily a "football school."
(Hoosiers teams have had only 22 winning seasons out of 67.) But
with football fortunes soaring under Dickens' direction, Indiana offici-
als apparently believe an attendance upsurge is on the way. (Where
else to go but up?)
Since so many people in the state of Indiana have been willing to
stay away from Bloomington on Hoosier home football Saturdays in
the past, the people who count gate receipts want to make sure there
is plenty of room to accommodate the larger crowds forecast for the
future. And perhaps the fascination of sitting in a new stadium will
draw additional customers.
At any rate, no new stadium will be dedicated at the Michigan-
Indiana gridiron tussle today. The Wolverines have journeyed to
Bloomington today with but a single purpose-to win a football game.
If only to uphold tradition.

Wisconsin Battles Illinois;
Spartans To Host Wildcats

The Big Ten, back in its cus-
tomary scramble after last week's
upsets, will attempt to settle the
issue this afternoon as Michigan
State plays host to Northwestern
and Illinois travels to Wisconsin.
The Badgers and Wildcats now
stuck in a first place tie follow-
ing Wisconsin's 24-19 victory over
NU last week, now are faced with
the problem of winning their last
two games and hoping for an as-
sist from someone else to gain the
undisputed title.
Michigan State will also be
fighting to retain their slim
chance at the roses this after-
noon. The only way they can go
to California is to have both Wis-
consin and Northwestern lose
their remaining games, while the
Spartans win both.'
Dean Look will lead the Spar-
tans against Northwestern. Look
passed for two touchdowns last
week as MSU upset Purdue, 15-0.
Northwestern, despite the loss
to Wisconsin still has strong am-
bitions of a California New Year's
celebration. With Ron Burton and
John Talley running and passing
out of the NU backfield the Cats
look too strong for MSU.
Over at Madison, Wisconsin
will be fighting to maintain the
edge they won last week at Evan-
ston. The Illini, upset by Michi-
gan, have yet to pull a major up-
set this fall and retiring coach
Ray Eliot may have something up
his sleeve for the burly Badgers.
However, Illinois has yet to run
into a line with the proportions
of the Wisconsin forward wall.
The Badger line has been the big
factor in their success this season.
'M' Harriers
Run Fifth
By The Associated Press
Michigan finished fifth in the
Big Ten cross country champion-
ships yesterday as Michigan State
swept to a record breaking vic-
tory at Washington Park in Chi-,
cago.
The Spartans led by Crawford
Kennedy, an easy individual win-
ner, swept the first three posi-
tions as well as taking fifth and
sixth places to establish a record
point total.
Iowa was second with 49 points
followed by Minnesota, 93; In-
diana, 94; and Michigan, 103. The
other Big Ten teams were either
not represented or had only par-
tial squads.

In the other two conference
games today Ohio State is at
home to face Iowa and Minne-
sota is at Purdue.
The Hawkeyes, out of the race,
but possibly the best team in the
conference at this point want re-
venge. Ohio has defeated' Iowa.
two years in a row. The gentle-
man who personally demolished
two good Iowa lines is back in the
person of fullback Bob White.
In the final game Purdue, its
hopes smashed by Michigan State
last week, will attempt to regain
some lost pride at the expense of
Minnesota.

MICHIGAN
Halstead
Jobson
Genyk
Smith
Callahan
J. Bushong
Johnson -
Noskin
Harper
Julian
Rio

LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB

INDIANA
Aucreman
Leo
Caldwell
Lauter
Noone
Gray
Faison
Scott
Jackson
Smith
Jones
(EST),

Kickoff--2:30 p.m.

Broadcasts: WUOM, WHRV,
WPAG, WWJ, WKM.

PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
AT FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow NO 2-3580
Wrn. S. Baker, Campus Pastor.
Patricia Pickett, Raja Nasr, counselors.
Sunday morning worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 11:50
"The Christian Life," David Van Winkle at
9:00
"Life's Hardest Lesson" George Laurant at
10:30 and 11:50..
Seminar discussion, "Life is Commitment,"
.10:30.
Student coffee hours 11:30.
Presbyterian Student Fellowship supper and
discussion, "Judo ism"-Dr. Herman Jacobs,
speaker. (Joint meeting.)
THIS WEEK IN THE CAMPUS CENTER
Tuesday 9-11 P.M. Coffee and discussion, 217 S.
Observatory.
Wednesday 7:15 P.M. 8th session of course in
Religious Beliefs. Lewis Room.
Friday 6:30 P.M. Grad group supper and discus-
sion-"Mental Health and Religion," The
Reverend Ballinger.
8:30-11 P.M. Young Married Couples Social
evening at the Campus Center.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH AND
THE EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and sermon for
students, followed by breakfast in Canterbury
House (Morning prayer on first Sunday).
11:00 A.M. Morning. prayer and sermon (Holy.
Communion on first Sunday).
5:00-Prof. Paul Spurlin, French Department,
Sartre - "Existentialism and Human Emo-
tions."
7:00 P.M. Evening prayer and commentary.
MEMORIAL BAPTIST
411 Fountai6 Street
Rev. William Nicholas, Pastor
and Student Advisor, NO 3-6098
9:45 A.M. Sunday School.
1 1:00 A.M. Morning Service.
6:30 P.M. Training Union.
7:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
Student evening class studying "Acts of the
Apostles."
Co-operating with Southern Baptist Convention
Wednesday,' 7:30 P.M. Mid-week prayer service.
Thursday and Friday, 5:15 P.M. Vesper, Lane
Hall.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, NO 2-1121
Rev. William C. Bennett, Th.M., Pastor
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
8:45 and 11:00 "The Secret of Staying Power."
3 :1 5 P.M. Special Vesper Service.
5:30 P.M. Student Guild.
5:45 P.M. Jr. and Sr. High Youth Groups.
7:00 P.M. A panel on "How To Know the Will
of God for My Life" by Dr. Pike, Mr. Art Kat-
terjohn, Miss Mae Morrison and Mrs. Nooma
Morgan.
7:30 P.M. Wednesday Prayer Meeting.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL.
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Minister
Orville Schroer, parish minister
9:30 A.M. Seminar-"Symbol," Rev. J. Edgar
Edwards, Guild House.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship, Rev. Ernest Klaudt.
Student Coffee Hour in Lounge after Service.
5:30 P.M. Cost Supper; Discussion-"Neglect or
Serve?" beginning at 7:00 P.M., Guild House.

Texas, Syracuse, USC
Eye Additional Victories

By TOM WITECKI
Only three teams remain un-
beaten in collegiate football ranks,
following last week's surprise-filled
Saturday that saw Louisiana State,
Northwestern and Penn State ab-
sorb their first losses.
And only one of this charmed
trio, Texas, is in serious danger
of losing this afternoon. The sec-
ond-ranked Longhorns meet a
tough Texas Christian squad that
is spoiling for an upset. An im-
pressive victory by Texas could
boost it 'into first in the national
rankings since they trail first-
place Syracuse by just a few
points.
Orange Face Weak Opposition
Syracuse, whose schedule is far
from the toughest in the country,
faces a weak Colgate squad in a
game that should do little more
than keep the Big Orange's statis-
tician busy.
The third team with a perfect
record, Southern California, faces
a hot and cold Baylor squad at Los
Angeles. The Trojans with the two
McKeevers, Marlon and Mike, are
tough, but the Bears can surprise
people as they did last week in
their near upset over Texas.
Volunteers Surprise
A big game involving two mem-
bers of the top ten is a contest
scheduled between fifth-ranked
Mississippi and ninth-ranked Ten-
nessee. One of the season's biggest
surprises, the Volunteers have al-
ready knocked off third-ranked
LSU and eighth-ranked Auburn.
The Tigers of Baton Rouge
should have an easy time re-
bounding from last week's big
upset as they face Mississippi
State in a game that should chal-

lenge the Syracuse contest for
pure one-sidedness.
Two intersectional contests fea-
ture ordinarily powerful teams
that are having off years. One
game pits Army against Oklahoma
and the second sends Notre Dame
against Pittsburgh.
Smith Wins
Grid Honor
This week Sports Illustrated
honored Michigan center and
linebacker, Gerald Smith, - by
naming him Lineman of the
Week.
Smith was cited for his strong
defensive play in Michigan's 20-
15 victory over Illinois last week-
end.
The Illini still had Rose Bowl
aspirations as they entered the
contest with Michigan.
With Illinois ahead 9-6, 187
pound Smith grabbed off an Il-
lini pass to set up Michigan's
winning drive. Later on Smith
added two more interceptions to
his defensive work and in doing
so squelched potential Illinois
scores.
The loss to Michigan dampened
all of Illinois' Rose Bowl hopes as
they now have two Conference
losses.
Smith is the first Michigan
player since Gary Prahst to be
honored with the Lineman of the
Week award. Prahst received his
award for outstanding defense in
last year's game with rival Mich-
igan State.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Services: 9:30 and 11:00, "Who Is Roy Riggles?"
-Dr. Fred E. Luchs preaching.
Bible Lectures 10:20 A.M. and 7:00 P.M. by
Mrs. Luchs.
Church School, crib through 9th grade, 9:30-10:40
and 10:55-12:00.
Student Guild: 5:30 supper at Guild House fol-
lowed by program.
Dr. Luchs speaks over WOIA, 1290, at 5:00 P.M
during November.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M., 12:00
'noon and 12:30 PM
Holyday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 noonknd 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 6:3, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wdnesday evening, 7:30 P.M
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes in Catholic Doctrine, Philosophy, Church
History, Scripture, Medical Ethics and Nursing
Ethics taught at the Center on weekday eve-
nings.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, minister to students.
Morning Worship, 9:00 and 11:15 a.m. Dr. Ru-
pert preaching, "A Testing Time forLoyalties"
The service is broadcast over WHRV 11:30-
12:15 A.M.
Student Discussion group, 10:15 "Meet the Pro-
fessor." Dr. Gerhard Lenski, Prof. of Sociology,
Speaking on "Individual Freedom and Sociolo-
gical Perspectives." Pine Room.
Student Fellowship supper at 5:30 p.m. Cost 40c.
Pine Room.
Student Worship and program at 7:00 pm. in
Wesley Lounge. Dr. Vaughn Whited, "A
Christian View of Man."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL & CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missou'i Synod)
Alfred Scheips, Pastor.
David Schramm. Vicar.
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the vicar, "Behold, I Come
Quickly."
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45: Bible Study groups.
Sunday at 6:Q0: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Founders' Day
Ceremony, commemorating 25th anniversary
of Gamma Delta, with former chapter presi-
dents as guests.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks, and the Rev. Hugh D.
Pickett, Ministers
SUNDAY-
11:00 Morning Worship-
6:45-The American Bpptist Student Fel-
lowship-
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Phone: NO 87622
SUNDAY-
9:00 A.M. Worship Service.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service & Communion,
7:00 P.M. Slides and Talk on Russia.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
9:30 A.M. Seminar, "Symbol," Rev. J. Edgar
Edwards. Guild House.y.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship - "Spiritual Eco-
nomics," Rev. Russell Fuller.
5:30 P.M. Cost Supper;'Discussion-"Neglect
or Serve?" beginning at 7:00 P.M., Guild
House.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Donald H. Meyer, Ministerial Interne -r

10:00 A.M. Adult Group-Ralph M. Gibson on;
'Minority Group Housing in Ann Arbor."
11:00 A.M. Services-Rev. Edward H. Redmar)
on: "Humanism and Theology."
7:00 P.M. Student Group-Folk Songs with Mr.
Grey Austin.

j

I,

Y

EVANGEL TEMPLE
(Assembly of God)
409 South Division
Burt Evans, Pastor

It

Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
C:A. Youth Service 6:30 P.M.
Evangelistic Service 7:30 P.M.
Wednesday: Bible Study and Prayer 7:45 P.M.
'You are most welcome!
"A Friendly Church Where Christ is Preached"
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
YMCA Building, 110 N. 4th Ave.
Rev. Raymond Weiss, pastor. NO 3-0348
10:00 A.M. Morning Worship, "The Christian's
Thank-Offering."
11:20 A.M. Student's Bible Class.
7:30 P.M. Evening Worship, "Breaking the
Witness Barriers."
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M. Geneva Student Fellow-
ship, Lane Hall.

U

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Big Ten Standings
W L T Pet.
Wisconsin 4 1 0 .800
Northwestern 4 1 0 '.800
Michigan State 3 2 0 .600
Purdue 2 2 1 .500
Ohio State 2 2 1 .500
Illinois 2 2 1 .500
MICHIGAN 2 3 0 .400
Iowa 2 3 0 .400
indiana 1 3 1 .300
Minnesota 1 4 0 .200
TODAY'S GAMES
Northwestern at Michigan State
MICHIGAN at Indiana
Illinois at Wisconsin
Purdue at Minnesota
Iowa at Ohio State
SCORE
Miami 26, S. Carolina 6

E
A
EAN
CASUAL~
HEAD WEAR

FOOTBALL MOVIES
of
1959 MICHIGAN
vs. ILLINOIS
Narrated by WALLY WEBER,

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgwood
Lester F. Alien, Minister
SUNDAY-
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
1 1 -()OA A M Sin..,A, Anrnn .;Prv ..ap

ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1416 Hill Street
NO 8-8802
10:30-11:30 Meeting for Worship.
10:30-11:30-Sunday School.
10:00-10:30 Family Worship.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH

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