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November 08, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY NO

VEMI

Wolverine 20-15 Win Led
jo, Harper, Julian Account for Wolverine Touchdowns
Ls Smith, Callahan Combine To Halt Illinois Aerials
(Continued from Page 1)

by Four

Interceptions
the game's the thing!
Fred Katz, Associate Sports Editor

The hosts failed their extra
dnt attempt but they held on de-
nsively for the remainder of
at period and most of the see-
id to put Michigan's football
>pes at their lowest since the
ichigan State runaway.
Michigan Comes to Life
As the minutes of the first half
aned, Michigan suddenly came
life for the first time.
With Michigan in midfield, Nos-
n unleashed a desperation pass
Benny McRae on a third down

and ten situation. Marshall Stark,
who had earlier intercepted Sta-
mos' pass was called for shoving
McRae and Michigan had an
automatic first down on the Illi-
nios ten.
The Wolverines, however, were
to be denied as an Illinois line
stopped the Rompers on the one-
yard line.
But this was the spark Michi-
gan needed. The next time the
Maize and Blue got the ball, they
were a fired-up, hard-hitting
team.

Noskin typified this by firing
three straight first down passes-
hitting Bob Johnson, John Hal-
stead, and Rio. The aerials moved
the ball 31 yards to the Illinois 13.
Noskin Fires Complete
For his fourth play, the little
passer fired another shot to John-
son who was in the end-zone.
Johnson deflected the ball. But
before Illini fans could sigh in re-
lief, opportunist Rio dove for the
falling ball and caught it. It was
Rio's first college touchdown.
Noskin was stopped on a con-
version run.
Michigan scored again in the
opening minutes of the second
half, after center Jerry Smith set
up things with an interception -
the first of three grabbed off yes-
terday. On the previous plays
Johnson and Halstead forced a
passing situation by throwing Il-
lini back for losses.
Smith Returns the Ball
Smith returned the ball to the
Illinois 26. Julian gained eight on
a sweep and Harper shocked the
foe with a ten-yard blast behind
right guard George Genyk.
Noskin called Harper for the
same play and he bowled himself
into the end-zone in one of his
best power runs of the year. Har-
per also place-kicked the point,
and Michigan led 13-9.
Now Illinois had to resort to an
offensive weapon they don't have
-passing. And their weakness be-
came a Michigan strong point as
Rio, Paul Raeder, Smith, and Alex
Callahan batted down some passes
and intercepted others.
Callahan Intercepti
A Callahan interception and a
barreling 43-yard runback to the
Illinois 28 by the guard set up
Michigan's insurance tally.
Nine plays later, Noskin called
Julian to run a play similar to
Harper's score, and the right half-
back scored from the one. En route
Noskin threw a 13-yard pass to
Julian for one first down and
carried seven yards on a fake pass
for the other.
Harper kicked the point.
Illinois rebounded immediately,
with an eight play, 65-yard drive.
The drive was sparked by John
Easterbrook who broke Michigan's
back with a pair of touchdown
passes last year. He hit Sparks
with a screen pass and the play
gained 39 yards.
Fullback Bill Brown took charge
from there and punched the ball
over. The point try failed, and the
scoring ended.

But the game was far from over.
There were 10:17 minutes remain-
ing.
The first-stringers began play-
ing a dual role. From offensive
aces they quickly converted to de-
fensive stalwarts. The line became
hard-charging pass defenders and
linebacker Smith cooperated by
intercepting two of the rushed
passes of Easterbrook.
Smith drew in the first one aft-
er guard Paul Poulos caught Eas-
terbrook for two consecutive losses.
He intercepted the second after
Genyk stormed in on the stubby
quarterback and forced him to
throw hurriedly.
After each interception, the "Go
Team" stalled the clock with cau-
tious routine running plays.

'I' on the Ball
Mich.

III.
11

FIRST DOWNS
RUSHING YARDAGE
PASSING YARDAGE
PASSES
PASSES INTERCEPTED
FIRST DOWNS
PUNTS
FUMBLES LOST
YARDS PENALIZED

13

102
79
7-11
BY 4
13
5-34.9
2
23

152
80
5-12
1
11
4-24.5
1
54

-Daily-Fred Shippey
REVERSE THE DIRECTION--That's exactly what's happening.
as Darrell Harper (41) intercepted a key pass off the fingertips
of Illinois quarterback John Easterbrook in the fourth quarter of
yesterday's game.

Improved olverines Receive Much
Praise from Elliott after Big Upset

-Daily-Fred Shippey
THE STATUE CRUMBLES-The statue in this instance refers to
the "Statue of Liberty" play in which Fred Julian (16) snatched
the ball from the hands of quarterback Stan Noskin. Blocking
the way is Jerry Smith (51) who played an outstanding game
both offensively and defensively,

By DAVE LYON
Associate Sports Editor
Special to The Daily
CHAMPAIGN -- Jubilation ran
rampant through the Michigan
dressing room after the Wolverines
had stunned a crowd of 45,600 by
thumping Illinois yesterday 20-15.
A smiling Coach Bump Elliott
praised the whole team and many
of its individuals for contributing
to the upset win.
Michigan's offensive and defen-
sive play were improved noticeably
over last week. Instrumental in
this improved offensive and defen-
sive showing were the Wolverine1
linebackers, and Elliott was high
in his praise of them. He especially
singled out Mike Fillichio, Gerry
Smith, and Alex Callahan. The last
two accounted for all four of
Michigan's interceptions.
The pass defense was sharply
improved, but not as markedly as
the offensive improvement. "What
really boosted us today was our
offense," Elliott said.
* * *

highlighted by the return of Stan!
Noskin to good passing form. As
in the victory at Minneapolis two
weeks ago, Noskin was regularly
hitting his receivers,;instead of the
defenders.
"Stan played a great game,"
Elliott said.
Also 'standing out was fullback
Tony Rio, "He played one of his E
finest games," Elliott stated. Rio

I

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College Scores
GRID PICK SCORES
Michigan 20, Illinois 15
Michigan State 15,aPurdue 0
Ohio State '0, Indiana 0
Iowa 33, Minnesota 0,
Wisconsin 24, Northwesteri 19
Georgia Tech. 14, Notre Dame
Missouri 13, Air Force 0'
Iowa State 18, Nebraska 6
Syracuse 20' Penn State 18
Harvard 14, Princeton 0
Pennsylvania 28, Yale 12
Clemson 6, Duke 0
Tennessee 14, LSU 13
Vanderbilt 11, Kentucky 6
Arkansas 14, Rice 10
Texas f3, Baylor 12
SMU 14, Texas A&M 11
Oregon 20, California 1I
Southern Cal. 36, W. Virginia
UCLA 55, Stanford 13

I

caught a deflected pass on his
shoetops in the end zone for
Michigan's first touchdown which
put Michigan back in'business.
Rio also batted a long Illinois
pass away front the intended re-
ceiver in Michigan's end zone in
the fourth quarter.
* * *
Each team fumbled four times,
most of the bobbles coming in the
first period. This frequent fumbl-
ing was partly due to the numbing
25 degree cold and partly to hard
tackling.
"Illinois has always had hard
tackling teams," Elliott said. "But
we held on to the ball after the
early stages of the game."
And when the Wolverines stop-
ped fumbling, they began scoring.
The joy in the Michigan dress-
ing room after the victory was
extreme as was the thickness of
the gloom in Illinois' locker room.
Losing Coach Ray Eliot was a
man of few words after the defeat,
saying only, "We played a lousy
game."

And Along Came Smith
CHAMPAIGN-Michigan yesterday incorporated enough irony in
itse victory script to satisfy the fussiest of movie directors.
In no particular order of sequence or significance, the Wolverines:
1) Rocked favored Illinois 20-15, thus ending a string of four
games in Memorial Stadium in which they themselves had been upset;
2) Cleared the air of further Rose Bowl talk and hopes by
giving the Illini their second Conference loss. Michigan had all but
reserved hotel space in Pasadena in 1955 when Illinois made like
the dog in the manger with a 25-6 bubble-buster;
3) Proved that the Big Ten's worst defense is better than, the
Big Ten's worst offense. Before the game, Michigan was reclining on
the bottom rung of the ladder of defensive statistics; Illinois was there
on offense;
4) Used the identical weapon, the intercepted pass, that Wis-
consin employed against them last week.
This final item is worthy of greater elaboration because the most
prolific interceptor of the day, Gerry Smith, has finally earned the
headlines his teammates will insist he has deserved all season.
As a center in the Big Ten, the 5'10", 187-pound Smith is a
physical misfit. He is underfed and near-sighted ("I feel like a midget
out there.")
Maybe that is why Mike Haadad, his high school coach at Detroit
Pershing, had him at quarterback on offense and at safety on defense.
Haadad's a great humanitarian.
Smitty (all popular guys named Smith are subjected to this uni-
formly individual nickname) must have gotten an inkling as to the
more hazards awaiting him when he became known as a fullback in
Wolverine coaching circles.
For what's most likely to happen to a seldom-used fullback on a
team where filling the center position becomes necessary? You guessed
it. Just move him about four giant steps in a straight-T formation
and a pivot man is born.
That's how Ernie Vic (Michigan, '21) became -an All-American.
Jim Dickey and Jim Byers (Michigan, '58) were no All-Americans, but
the principal, was the same. And in between those 37 years, many a
Wolverine fullback eventually found himself manning the position
that generally handles the ball only before the play begins.
It was with a belligerent disapproval of this recognized rule of
centering that Smitty the Midget establisled himself yesterday as
David among the Goliaths of his trade.
HREE TIMES he hugged to his white-shirted bosom wayward
footballs intended for blue-shirted Illini.
The first of his thefts helped put, Michigan in the lead perman-
ently.
The last two interceptions assured him the life-long animosity
of quarterback Jonasthon Easterbrook. Smitty shouldn't-be too worried
though, because if he is a midget, -Easterbrook (5'8" 156-pounds) is
Tom Thumb.
Midway through the fourth quarter; Illinois was making one of
its. final panicked attempts to eliminate a 20-15 deficit. On a third-
and-twenty ,situation, Easterbrook lined a pass to Johnny Counts at
midfield. It hit Counts' chest and bounced farther than -a bad check.
Smitty's knuckles must have scraped the ground but his hands
were, there before the truant pigskin could touch the 50 yard marker.
Michigan thus was able to eat up valuable time. By the time
Illinois got the ball again, it was -on its own 19 with less than three
minutes left.
Smitty's second encore sent the frozen spectators towards the
exits. Ie hauled in Easterbrook's pass on the Michigan 44 to complete
his threestage masterpiece of mid-afternoon banditry.
While the Champaign County Sheriff's Office was putting up
warrants for Smitty's seizure, Dad Smith stood with his arms around
his grimy son in the lockerroom, displaying the affection only a father
could have for a robber.
Did Smitty use any secret weapon, like radar, geiger counters,
or divining rods?
"Nope," he revealed, "I just polished up my contact lenses.
This is one guy we wouln't toast with "Here's mud in your eye."

k

4

10
0

I The offensive resurgence

was

SHOW
OPH

P reie l/

1

"ONON
TOUCH
OFF
VENUS"

Big Ten
Wisconsin
Northwestern
Michigan State
Purdue
Illinois
Ohio State
Iowa
MICHIGAN
Indiana
Minnesota

Standings
W L T Pet.
4 1 0 .800
4 1 0 .800
3 2 0 .600
2 2 1 .500
2 2 1 .500
2 2 1 .500
2 3 0 .400
2 3 0 .400
1 3 1>.300
1 4 0 .200

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Members 75c
Non-members $1.25

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Nov. 12-14
8:00 P.

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