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November 07, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

wolverines
M' Offense Must Jell
To Crack Illini Defense

Seek

Upset

Victory

t

NU To Face Wisconsin;
Rose Bowl Bid at Stake

COME TC
O"N Hth SABBATH3

(Continued from Page 1)
lowed four league opponents an
average of only 188 yards (best
defensive record in the Big Ten)
and a total of 39 points. Michi-
gan has given up twice as many
points and nearly twice as many
yards.
Defense Not Ineffective
The Michigan defense should
not be thus rated as twice as in-
effective as Illinois'. Many of the
points scored by Wolverine op-
ponents this season have resulted
from Michigan offensive mistakes,
such as intercepted passes and lost
fumbles in Michigan territory.

And, since the 34-8 Michigan
State pasting, Michigan coach*
Bump Elliott has developed a unit,
the "Raiders," specializing in de-
fense. This platoon, which gave;
up no first downs against Wiscon-
sin, has helped give Michigan de-
fensive respectability unknown
since the 1956 season.
The Raiders and Michigan's two
offensive units will try to contain
an Illinois offense that revolves
around the running of sophomore
halfback John Counts and junior,
fullback Bill Brown.
Counts, 170 - pound left half,'
scored Illinois' only touchdown
against Purdue on a 22-yard run.
During the 72-yard scoring march,
Counts carried six times for 63
yards. He has a 4.7 season average
with 213 yards in 45 carries.
Brown Has 4.2 Average
Brown, a 210-pounder, sports a
4.2 average compiled on 210 yards
in 50 cracks at the line. Sopho-
more quarterback Mel Myers
passes - sparingly but effectively.
He completed four of seven tosses
against Purdue for 69 yards.
Michigan may be able to stopl
the Illini attack, but defense can't4
do the whole job for the Wol-
verines. To wil, they must score
some points. Michigan coaches are
hopeful that senior quarterback
Stan Noskin can regain the pass-
ing form he showed against Min-
nesota two weeks ago but failed
Correction
The score of Thursday
night's I-M volleyball game
between Sigma Alpha Mu and
Phi Sigma Delta was 4-2 in
favor of the Sammies and not
the reverse as was incorrectly
printed yesterday.

'4.

PAUL PALMER
S* . *looks for receiver
to show last week against Wis-
consin, when he had five passes
intercepted.
Last in the Big Ten in rushing
offense, Michigan's hopes for an
upset win today will depend to a
large extent on the passing arms
of Noskin and soph Paul Palmer,
who will again direct the Wol-
verines' second offensive unit.

Northwestern battles Wisconsin
thi; afternoon before the first
sell-out crowd in Evanston, Ill.
since the 1949 Michigan game, in
the contest that should decide the
Big Ten championship and the
Rose Bowl bid.
The unbeaten Wildcats, ranked
second nationally, will be gunning
for their first undisputed confer-
ence title since 1936, and their first
Rose Bowl bid since 1948. They
also will be attempting to break
the school record for a football
winning streak, thelongest previ-
ous one being six games by the
1936 championship team.
Wisconsin also has plenty at
stake. They are looking for their
first undisputed crown since 1912,
and want the bowl bid badly to
avenge the 7-0 defeat suffered in
the 1953 classid at the hands of
Southern California. The loss is
the only one ever charged to a
Big Ten team in tpe current Rose
Bowl series.
Can Wisconsin Stop Speedsters?
The big question in today's game
is, can the huge Wisconsin line
contain the fleet Northwestern
backfield. With Ron Burton, Roy
Purdin and Mike Stock playing
like All-Americans, the opportune
Wildcats have managed to come
up with the winning touchdown
every week despite close calls from
Minnesota, Michigan and Notre
Dame.
With the exception of Dick
Thornton, who is lost for the sea-
son, the Cats will be at full
strength. Burton, who was out for
three games with an ankle injury,
proved he is healthy again as he
returned a punt 67 yards for a
touchdown last week.
The Badgers are also in top
shape. They came out of the game
with Michigan last week with only
a few minor bruises. Dale Haek-
bart, their star quarterback and
a leading contender for All-Ameri-
ca honors, had a bad day against
the Wolverines but will probably
not have two in a row as he is the
key to the entire Wisconsin of-
fense.
Other Contests Scheduled
In the other Big Ten games,
Minnesota travels to Iowa, and
Indiana is at Columbus to face
Ohio State before more than 81,-
000 fans in Ohio Stadium. Purdue,
still hoping for a share of the
title, is at East Lansing to engage
Michigan State.
This game in Spartan Stadium
may well be an extremely im-
portant one. Should Wisconsin
beat Northwestern, the Boiler-

makers would be back in the race
as they hold the only win over
the Badgers. However, in order to
preserve their slim chance, they
must win over Michigan State.
Michigan State, on the other
hand, was eliminated from the
bowl picture last week at Ohio, but
would like nothing better than to
upset Purdue, a team that has
twice spoiled perfect seasons for
the Spartans.
Prestige at Stake
In Columbus the only thing at
stake is prestige. Ohio State will be
trying to regain theirs, and Indi-
ana will be hoping to avoid an-.
other loss to the Buckeyes. Ohio
State has beaten the Hoosiers
seven consecutive times, and
poured it on last year by the
whopping score of 49-8.
In Iowa City, a sell-out Dad's
Day crowd of 60,000 will watch
Iowa and Minnesota battle to get
out of the cellar in their annual
tradition-packed battle. At stake
is a sacred old trophy, Floyd of
Rosedale, a battered old brass pig
which Iowa now holds.
The Hawkeyes are favored to
retain possession this afternoon
as they boast too much speed
for the oversized, leadfooted Goph-
ers. Coach Forest Evashevski prob-
ably has the best last place team
in the country as proven by last
week's 53-0 rout of Big Eight team
Kansas State.
'Dukes Signs
With Pistons
MINNEAPOLIS W) - Walter
Dukes, seven-foot center of the
Detroit Pistons pro basketball
team, finally signed his contract
yesterday, ending a holdout which
began Oct. 14.
Dukes. agreed to terms with
General Manager Nick Kerbawy of
the Pistons over long-distance
telephone, and will play in his
first game Tuesday against the
Boston Celtics at St. Louis. (Note:
The Daily previously reported that
Dukes quit, which he himself an-.
nounced, but now it appears that
he is going to play.)
NBA SCORE
Detroit 118, Minneapolis 113
(2 overtines)
COLLEGEFOOTBALL SCORE
Miami 14, North Carolina 7

kneel before the Lord ou

r maker." Psalm 96, 6.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL & CENTER

Probable Lineups

MICH.
Halstead
Jobson
Genyk
Smith
Callahan
Schopf-
Johnson
Noskin
Harper
Julian
Rio

LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB

"O come, let us worship and bow down; let us

ILLINOIS
Wood
Roberts
Burrell
Stapleton
Gremer
Rutgens.
Patrick
Meyers
Blackaby
Counts
Brown
(CST)

BILL BROWN
.. star Illinois fullback

Kickoff: 1:30 p.m.

LSU TRIES FOR NUMBER EIGHT:
Undefeated Penn State, Syracuse Clash.

.

By TmOM WITECKI

Only six major teams remain
unbeaten with the college football
season well past the half-way
mark, although at least one of this
tsextet will have tasted defeat
before this afternoon's action sub-
sides.
One perfect record is certain to
be ruined at University Park,
Penn., where Penn State plays host
to Syracuse in the top Eastern
game of the '59 season.
The Orangemen, who are the
nation's fourth-ranked team, will
have to contain the efforts of
Penn State's brilliant quarterback,
Richie Lucas, if they hope to down
the seventh-rated Nittany Lions.
LSU,After Eighth Straight
The country's number one team,
Louisiana State, has run over seven
straight opponents this fall and
should make it eight this afternoon
when tL. meet Tennessee. But,
don't count the Volunteers short.
They are capable of springing an
upset, especially if the Tigers are
suffering a letdown after last
week's "big" win over Mississippi.
Sparked by speedy halfbacks
Jack Collins and Rene Ramirez,
third-rated Texas will also be
seeking its eighth consecutive win
of the season today against Baylor.
Sixth-ranked Southern Califor-
nia will try to keep its slate clean
when it meets West Virginia in an
intersectional contest, while the
sixth undefeated team, Northwest-
ern, number two in the nation,
meets ninth-ranked Wisconsin at
Evanston.
Mississippi, Auburn To Loaf
Two Southern members of the
country's top ten, number five Mis-
sissippi and number eight Auburn,

face relatively soft touches in
Chattanooga and Mississippi State,
respectively. In contrast to this,
tenth-ranked Clemson faces a
tought opponent in Duke - the
team that upset Georgia Techlast
week.
Speaking of Georgia Tech, the
"Rambling Wrecks" will be in
South Bend this afternoon to face
the Fighting Irish of Notre Dame.

A top game in Ivy League circles
will be the contest between Penn-
sylvania and Yale, both of whom
were unbeaten until last Saturday
when the upset axe fell.
The televised game of the week
will feature once-beaten and tied
Air Force against the Missouri
Tigers, last-second conqueror of
Michigan in the season opener for
the Wolverines.

PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
.OF THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
Wm. S. Baker, Campus Pastor.
Patricia Pickett, Raja Nasr, counselors.
Sunday morning worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 11:50
"Trumpets, Please!"--Dr. Kuizenga.
Seminar discussion - "Life is Commitment"
10:30.
Student coffee hours 11:30.
Presbyterian Student Fellowship supper and
discussion-5:45 "The Nature of the
Holy Scripture"-David Van Winkle.
THIS WEEK IN THE CAMPUS CENTER
Tuesday 9-11 p.m. Coffee and discussion, 217 S.
Observatory.
Wednesday 7:15 P.M. 6th session of course in
Christian Beliefs.
Friday 6:30 P.M. Grad group supper and discus-
sion-'"'Contemporary Literature and Religion"
-Tony Stoneburner, speaker.
7:00 P.M. Meet at Cmpus Center toleave for
Dodge House Work Camp.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Phone: NO 8-7622
SUNDAY-
9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services. Dean
Robert Long, Guest Preacher.
7:00 P.M. Speaker: Dean Robert 0. Long,
Wittenberg University.
FRIDAY-
8:00 P.M. Party at the Center.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, minister to students.
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Church Services-'Stand
By the Church," Sermon by Dr. Rupert.
10:15 A.M. Student Discussion Group. "Meet the
Professor." Dr. John Reed, Prof. of Law,
"G. P."
5:30 P.M. International Fellowship Supper, In-
donesian Cuisine.
7:00 P.M. Worship & Program. "Religion 6 Poli-
tics," Dr. George Peek, Prof. of Pol. Sc.
Service Broadcast over WHRV Detroit 11:30-
12:15 A.M.
EVANGEL TEMPLE
(Assembly of God)
409 South Division
Burt Evans, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
C. A. Youth Service 6:30 P.M.
Evangelistic Service 7:30 P.M.
Wednesday: Bile Study and Prayer 7:45 P.M.
You are most welcome!
"A Friendly Church Where Christ is Preached"
A ANN ARBOR REFORMED CHURCH
YMCA Building 110 N. 4th Ave.
Rey. Raymond Weiss, pastor. NO 3-0348
10:00 A.M. Morning Worship "The Church Cares
for Man's Physical Needs." (Nursery during
Morning Worship) /
11:20 A.M. Students' Bible Class.
7:30 P.M. Evening' Worship. "God Hates Hy.
pocrisy."
For transportation call NO 3-1561, Lloyd, Ext.
2543.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, NO 2-1121
Rev. William C. Bennett, Th.M., Pastor
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
8:45 and 11:00 "The Silence of God."
5:30 Student Guild.
5:45 Junior and Senior High Youth Groups.
7:00 "The Superiority of Christ."
7:30 Wednesday Prayer Service.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty. Reading room hours are 10:00 A.M.
to 5:00 P.M. daily, 7 to 9 Monday evening.
BETHLEHEMEEVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.

Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Minister
Orville Schroer, parish minister
7:00 P.M. Student Guild
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship, Rev. Ernest Klaudt
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, pasto
10:00 A.M. Morning Worship Service.
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour.
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service.

i

1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred Scheips, Pastor.
David Schramm, Vicar.
Sunay at 9:15 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "The Evangelical
Christian Looks At Darwinism." (Holy Com-
munion in Both Services).
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45: Bible Study groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, cordially invites international students as
guests for the 6 o'clock supper and the pro-
gram following, featuring the showing of "A
Place To Go," a movie on medical missions.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks, and the Rev. Hugh D.
Pickett, Ministers
SUNDAY-
11:00 Morning Worship-""To Share in the
lnheriance of the Saints"-The Rev.
Hugh D. Pickett.
6:45-The American Baptist Student Fe-
lowship-There is no meeting planned,
however the house will be open for any-
one who would like to come.
THURSDAY-I-.
4:00-Prayer group.
FRIDAY-
Ali Church Square Dance-all are invited.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M., 12:00
noon and 12:30 P.M.
Holyday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 noon and 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A,
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening,7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classesin Catholic Doctrine, Philosophy, Church
History, Scripture, Medical Ethics and Nursing
Ethics taught at the Center on weekday eve-
nings.
MEMORIAL BAPTIST
411 Fountain Street
Rev. William Nicholas, Pastor
and Student Advisor, NO 3-6098
9:45 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Morning Service.
6:30 P.M. Training Union.
7:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
Student evening class studying "Acts of the
Apostles."
Co-operating with Southern Baptist Convention
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M. Mid-week prayer service.
Thursday and Friday, 5:15 P.M. Vesper, Lane
Hall.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH AND
THE EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 AM. Holy Communion and sermon for
students, followed by breakfast in Canterbury
House (Morning prayer on first Sunday).
11:00 A.M. Morning prayer and sermon (Holy
Communion on first Sunday.
5:00 Supper. The Rev. Edward A. Roth, Chaplain
Metalious, PEYTON PLACE.
7:00 P.M. Evening prayer and commentary.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Services 9:30 and 11:00-"INVEST"-Dr. Fred
E. Luchs preaching.
Bible Lectures: 10:20 A.M. and 7:00 P.M., Mrs.
Luchs.
Church School, crib through 9th grade: 9:30-
10:40 and 10:55-12:00.
Student Guild: 7:00 Guild House. "Does Drama
Speak To You?"
Dr. Luchs broadcasts over station WOIA each
Sunday during November at 5:00, 1290 on
dial.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Donald H. Meyer, Ministerial Interne
10 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group-Prof. Carise
Freud of School of Social Work: "What Does
a Community Owe to its Youth?"
11 A.M. Services. Rev. Edward H. Redman preach-
ing on "Our Judeo-Christian Heritage."
6 P.M. Unitarian Student Group-Dinner 50
cents. Transportation at 5:45 P.M. from
Dorms.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgwood
Lester F. Allen, Minister
SUNDAY-

10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00, A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening worship.
WEDN ES DAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1416 Hill Street
NO 8-8802
10:30-11:30 Meeting for Worship.
10:30-11:30-Sunday School.
10:00-10:30 Family Worship.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
i131 Church St.

4

5 1

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You're looking for a job. Not just any job,
but one where you know for sure you'll be
doing exactly the kind of work you are most
interested in. One that will give you every
chance to grow with the company.
Sure, fringe benefits are fine.Link Aviation
offers as good or better than the rest. But
how about the day-to-day operation? What'
kind of assignments will you get? Check these
opportunities available right now at Link:
" servo-mechanism design work
" analog computer design, solving linear and
non-linear diferential equations.
" function generator problems using 1, 2 or 3
variables, utilizing both digital and analog

Many of the above techniques are used in
current Link projects, such as building jet
simulators for the Boeing 707, Douglas DC-8,
Convair 880, Lockheed Electra, the Navy's
A3J jetfighter, or the fire control on the B-58.
And there are others that we can't talk about
just yet.

If thoughts of financial planning
leave you feeling this way, you
should do something about it now.

You may be surprised how little
money you need to begin your
lifetime financial program. Life
insurance is the perfect founda-
tion because it offers protection
and savings features.

There they are . . . some of the current op-
portunities at Link, both in Binghamton, New
York, and in Palo Alto, California. If these or
similar positions interest you, contact your
Placement Office 'for an interview in advance.
Link Aviation will be on the University of
Michigan campus on Wednesday, November 11,
or if you prefer, forward a brief resume of your
qualifications to:

EMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
corner of E. Washington & 5th Ave.

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