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November 06, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

GRID SELECTIONS
As usual on Friday, a guest among the predictors. He is Tom
Curner, Daily Editor, who has shifted to sports for the day.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES
(Consensus Picks in Caps, Consensus, 81-39-.675)

Phi Alpha Kappa To Meet,
Nu Sigma Nu in Grid Final

Pro Standings

Lucas Leads Penn Stc

Man
Bost
Det3
Tor
New
Chic

L. MICHIGAN at Illinois (Score)
2. PURDUE at Michigan State
3. Indiana at OHIO STATE
4. Minnesota at IOWA
5. Wisconsin at N'WESTERN
6. GA. TECH at Notre Dame
7. AIR FORCE at Missouri
8. NEBRASKA at Iowa State
9. SYRACUSE at Penn State
0. PRINCETON at Harvard

11. YALE at Pennsylvania
12. Duke at CLEMSON
13. LSU at Tennessee
14. KENTUCKY at Vanderbilt
15. ARKANSAS at Rice
16. Baylor at TEXAS
17. SMU at Texas A&M
18. California at OREGON
19. W. Va. at SOUTHERN CAL.
20. UCLA at Stanford

SPORTS STAFF SELECTIONS
TOM WITECKI (80-40-.667)-Michigan, Purdue, OSU, Iowa,
>rthwestern, Ga. Tech, Air Force, Iowa State, Syracuse, Princeton,.
nn, Clemson, LSU, Kentucky, Arkansas, Texas, SMU, Oregon, S.
il., UCLA.
JIM BENAGH (Sports Editor, 80-40-.667)-Michigan, Purdue,
SU, Iowa, Wisconsin, Ga. Tech, Air Force, Nebraska, Syracuse,
arvard, Penn, Clemson, LSU, Kentucky, Arkansas, Texas, SMU,
regon, S. bal., UCLA.
* * * *
DAVE LYON (Associate Sports Editor,' 79-41-.659)--Illinois,
irdue, OSU , Iowa, Wisconsin, Ga. Tech, Air Force, Nebraska, Syra-
ise, Princeton, Yale, Clemson, LSU, Kentucky, Arkansas, Texas,
MU, Oregon, S. Cal., UCLA.
MAL APPLEBAUM (75-45--.625)-Illinois, Purdue, OSU, Iowa,
orthwestern, Notre Dame, Air Force, Iowa State, Syracuse, Princeton,
enn, Clemson, LSU, Kentucky, Arkansas, Texas, SMU, Oregon, S.
al., Stanford.

By BILL PHELPS
As a result of their overwhelm-
ing victories yesterday, Phi Alpha
Kappa and Nu Sigma Nu advanced
to the first place finals in the I-M
professional fraternity football
playoffs.
Quarterback Jack Faber scored.
22 points and passed to ends Hank
Visser and Tom Newhoff for 14
niore as Phi Alpha Kappa beat
Alpha Kappa Psi, 38-0.
Sharp-passing Francie Gutman
and speedy Harold Netzer led Nu
Sigma Nu to a 28-0 victory over
Delta Sigma. Delta.
Sethi-Finals
In the second-place semi-finals,
Phi Delta Phi and the Falcons
came through with winning efforts.
IPhi Delta Phi end Len Treash
was high-scorer as he accounted
for all 12 points to shut out Delta
Theta Phi, 12-0. Bob Topp's two
touchdowns inspired the Falcons
to their 20-0 win over Phi Rho
Sigma.
The third-place final will be a
battle of dentists and lawyers. Psi
Omega and the Law Club won
their semi-final games over Phi
Chi and Phi, Delta Epsilon, 1-0
and 2-0, respectively.

Gamma Alpha beat Delta Sigma
Phi, 32-6, and Alpha Chi Sigma
beat Phi Delta Chi, 30-0, in the
semi-finals for the fourth place
championship. Right half Jerry
White contributed 12 points and
right half Dave Haartz eight to
Alpha Chi Sigma's winning effort.
Alpha Omega gained the right
to play for the fifth place cham-
pionship as they won by forfeit
over Tau Epsilon Rho.

WVL TPts. GFC
ntreal 9 2 3 21 48
;ton 7 5 1 15 48
trolt 6 3 3 15 28
onto 6 3 2 14 30
vYork 2 9 2 6 33
cage 1 9 1 3 19
LAST NIGHT's GAMES
Montreal 8, New York 2
Boston 8, Detroit 3
EASTERN DIVISION
W L Pct. G
ton 5 0 1.000
ladelphia 3 0 1.000 1
w York 22 .500
racuse 2 3 .400
WESTERN DIVISION
Louis 2 2 .500
roit 2 3 .400
cinnati 2 4 .333 1
nneapolis 1 5 .167

Ros
Phi
New
Syr
St.
Det
Cii
Min

TONIGHT'S GAME
Detroit at Minneapolis

GA
31
43
23
25
50
34
1
2% !
3
1
2

I

L
t)
tt
u.
Q
h
c:

the game's the thing!#
Fred Katz, Associate Sports Editor

He Who Lives by the Sword .. .

When the blue jerseyed Nittany
Lions of Penn State Universityk
trot onto the turf of Beaver Field
to face the powerful Syracuse Sat-
urday, 60,000 eyes will be focusedt
on one man.
His name is Richie Lucas.
The tall senior quarterback<
holds the key to Penn State'st
chances of upsetting the fourth-
ranked Orangemen in the east's1
top football attraction of the sea-,
son.
His coach, Rip Engle, said, "He's
the best all around back in the
country." The statistics on Lucasl
verify this statement..
Unbeaten RecordI
In leading Penn State to their
unbeaten record Lucas has thrown
six touchdown passes, scored five
more himself, and set up a half
dozen more scores with his alert
offensive and defensive play.
Against Missouri Lucas com-
pleted 10 of 11 passes, against Vir-
ginia Military Institute he hit on
eight of 11. He was masterful in
the Nittany Lions' 17-11 victory
over Army and scored twice in
their 21-12 win over Boston Uni-
versity.
His best game came at Cleve-
land as the Lions roared past Il-
linois, 20-9. Besides intercepting
two Illini passes in a starring qe-
fensive role, he ran for 66 yards,
passed for 77 more and finished
the day by scoring Penn States'
final touchdown.
A national magazine at the
start of the season called him
"The East's top quarterback, a
solid old-fashioned triple threat."
Engle has called him, the best
back he ever coached, and Engle
has coached some good ones, in-
cluding Baltimore Colt star Lenny
M~oore.
Moore.At His Best
However, Saturday Lucas will
have to be at his All-American

best as the tough Syracuse team
is also unbeaten. The rough Or-
angemen have rolled over six foes
and in the process have managed
to become the nation's top offen-
sive and defensive team.
Coach Floyd Schwartzwalder's
strong team has held opponents
to an average of 96 yards rushing
and passing, while their offense
has averaged 426 yards per game.
They rank far above all other ma-
jor college teams in the battle of
statistics.
To match Lucas, Syracuse will
have bruising Ernie Davis running
at full steam from his usual half-
back position. The Orangemen
have beaten good teams like West
Virginia by huge scores, downing
the Mountaineers, 44-0, two weeks
ago.
But as Lucas goes so goes Penn
State and he has yet to have a1
bad day.

RICHIE LUCAS
, . . best in the East

Volleyball Scores

1

* * * *
BUZ STEINBERG (73-47-.609)--Illinois, Purdue, OSU, Iowa,
Northwestern, Ga. Tech, Air Force, Iowa State, Syracuse, Princeton,
Yale, Clemson, LSU, Kentucky, Arkansas, Texas, SMU, Oregon, S.
Cal., UCLA.
MIKE GILLIAM (72-48-.600)-Michigan, Purdue, OSU, Iowa,
Wisconsin, Ga. Tech, Air Force, Nebraska, Syracuse, Princeton, Penn,
Clemson, LSU, Vanderbilt, Arkansas, Texas, SMU, Oregon, So. Cal.,
UCLA.
CLIFF MARKS (70-50-.583),-Illinois, Purdue, OSU, Iowa, North-
western, Ga. Tech, Air Force, Nebraska, Syracuse, Harvard, Yale,
Duke, LSU, Vanderbilt, Arkansas, Texas, SMU, Oregon, S. Cal., UCLA.
* * * *
TOM TURNER.(Guest Selector, 66-54-.550)--Michigan, Purdue,
OSU, Iowa, Northwestern, Ga. Tech, Air Force, Nebraska, Syracuse,
Harvard,, Yale, Clemson, LSU, Kentucky, Arkansas, Texas, SMU,
Oregon, S. Cal., UCLA.
*, * * *
FRED KATZ (Associate Sports Editor, 63-57-.525)-Michigan,
Purdue, OSU, Iowa, Northwestern, Ga. Tech, Air Force, Nebraska,
Syracuse, Harvard, Yale, Duke, LSU, Kentucky, Arkansas, Texas,
Texas A&M, California, S. Cal., UCLA.
A eolum of hscid nfal infr igenco
by ocv /brmd
"THE woRM TURNS"
Shakespeare said it this wayr
"The smallest worm will
turn,-beingtrodden on.'
But Miguel de Cervantes
beat him to it in"o
Quixote", Part I, Book 3:
"Even a worm when trod
upon, will turn again."

Bus. Ad. 6, Soc. Research 0
Cooley 'A' 6, Psych. 'E' 0
Psych. 'A' 6, English 'B' 0
Nat. Resources 4, Romance Lang. 2
Psych. 'C' Zoology 'B' 0
Geology 6, Sociology 0
SOCIAL FRATERNITIES
Delta Sigma Phi 6, Tau Kappa Ep-
silon 0
Acacia 6, Delta Clii 0
Theta i 6, Phi Kappa Sigma 0
Phi Sigma Delta 4, Sigma Alpha
Mu 2,
Lambda Chi Alpha 6, Trigon 0
Chi Psi 6, Phi Kappa Psi 0
Kappa Sigma 6, Delta Kappa Epsi-
Ion 0
Alpha Epsilon Pi.5, Triangle 1
Delta Upsilon 5, Tau Delta Phi 1
Alpha Delta Phi 5, Sigma Phi 1
Psi Upsilon 4, Zeta Psi 2
Phi Gamma Delta 6, Beta Theta Pi 0
Sigma Phi EpsiloU 4, Beta Theta Pi 2
Zeta, Beta Tau 4, Sigma Chi 2
Ua

jUST A LONG forward pass from Illinois' Memorial Stadium is a
J cemetery. Michigan's football teams of both the distant and recent 1
past will tell you this is symbolic.+
To them the double-decked horseshoe arena is more than a1
gridiron-it's an appropriately-placed annex to the burial ground.
Plowed beneath this 100-yard stretch of Prairie State loam are
enough Wolverine championship hopes to fill a good-sized family plot.
Athletic Director and Head Coach Fielding H. Yost must have
had his suspicions raised the first time he took his Michigan charges,
onto the Illini's present field.-
It was the Stadium's dedication day in 1924. The players across
the line from the Wolverines were real enough. Unfortunately, so
was the 39-14 score.
Only the damage was inflicted by a "ghost"-a carrot-topped
apparition visible to all but the 11 Michigan men on the field. For
euphonics sake he was dubbed the "Galloping Ghost."
Red Grange's many trips down the sidelines that day 35 years
ago should have been the tip-off to the ghoulish mischief Illinois
teams were to perpetrate in the future.
We can skip over the 1930's and '40's, not because Illinois didn't
occasionally look like world-beaters at home against Michigan; but
because the Wolverines will be in Champaign tomorrow to put an end
to nonsense that has occurred the past decade.-
Beginning in 1951, and in every other year following, Michigan
has invaded the Illini open-air wigwam. In- each of those seasons,
the Wolverines were the bookies' darlings in pre-game point-spread
estimates.
Return of Big Ten victory trophies to Ann Arbor weren't con-
sidered unlikely if . . . if the Illini hurdle could becleared.
But the Wolverines tripped every time.
In '51 it was a Tommy O'Connell-to-Rex Smith pass in the
swirling snow that put Michigan title talk in cold storage. Illinois 7,
Michigan 0.
J. C. Caroline was an All-American in 1953. The Wolverines will
tell you he earned it. Illinois 19, Michigan 3.
Abe Woodson wasn't accorded much high national honors in 1955.
He would have been had he played the Wolverines every Saturday.
Illinois 25, Michigan 6.
Bo'jby Mitchell was no disgrace to the long line of Illinois' death-
dealing halfbacks in 1957. Illinois 20, Michigan 19.

McNitt To Replace Inured
Tureaud in 'M' Backfield

This afternoon at 2:30 Coach
Bump Elliott and his beleaguered
Wolverine squad will leave for
Champaign where they will try
for their third victory of the sea-
son Saturday against Illinois.
However, Ken Tureaud will not
be making the trip because ,of a
shoulder injury received in the
Wisconsin game. In his place at
left half in the second team back-
field will be Gary McNitt. Elliott
also named Paul Palmer to take
over the second string quarter-
backing duties formerly held by
Don' Hannah, who will not make
the trip.
Others who are making the trip
for Michigan are: Jerry Bushong,

Reid Bushong, Alex Callahan,
Keith Cowan, Guy Curts, Tom
DeMassa, Don Deskins, Guy De-
Stefano, Mike Fillichio, Dennis
Fitzgerald, George Genyk, Todd
Grant, Lee Hall, John Halstead,
Darrell Harper, Willard Hilde-
brand, Tom Jobson, Bob Johnson,
Fred Julian and Gary Kane.
Also, Jim Korowin, Scott
Maentz, Bennie McRae, George
Mans, Gary McNitt, Harry New-
man, Stan Noskin, Paul Palmer,
Lou Pavloff, Paul Poulos, Paul
Raeder, Tony Rio, Jon Schopf,
Gerry Smith, John Stamos, Steve
Stieler, Bill Stine, Bill Tunnicliff
and Rudd Van Dyne.

i

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Supply Continues -. .
LLINOIS' Coach Ray Eliot still hasn't run out of speedsters. He'
call on sophomores Ethan Blackaby and John Counts tomorroi
to carry on the tradition against Michigan.
But one thing Eliot won't be able to do is to pull his favorit
upset shenanigans. Illinois is a one-touchdown favorite.
Through the years, no coach in the country has acquired
reputation to equal Eliot's for inspiring a team to dizzying heights o
one or two Saturdays a year.
Eliot is far from popular with the lay critics in Champaign an
outlying districts. Many have felt he's been a poor successor to Bo
Zuppke the past 17 years. There was silent rejoicing among thei
when Eliot announced last year that this would be his last season o
the field.
That he's lasted there as long as he has can be attributed in n
small way to his skills of oratory in the locker room.
Michigan hasn't been the only one to feel the indirect effect
of his powers of persuasion and mesmerism. In 1956, his Illini am
bushed Michigan State, 20-13, then ranked number one in the countr
This alone was enough to quiet the wolves who might have otherwis
been displeased with an overall 2-5-2 record.
And it wasn't such a long time ago, 1957 to be specific, tht
Minnesota was thought to have the best football team in the lan(
Most everyone believed it until Illinois shouted "It's a lie!" an
pasted the Gophers, 34-13, for proof.
Michigan, underdogs in'Illinois' Stadium for the first time i
many moons, would deem it only fitting and proper that it bid a fins
adieu to Mr. Eliot using his favorite weapon-the upset.

11
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"MUSIC HAS CHARMS"
The 17th Century playwright, William Congreve,
was the first to set down this classic metaphor
concerning the powers of sound and rhythm.
You'll find the whole quote in "The Mourning
Bride", Act I, Sc. 1:
"Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast,
To soften rocks, or bend a knotted oak."
"RHYME OR-REASON"
Edmund Spenser, 16th Century poet, expected a
pension. He didn't get it. So he wrote this rhyme:
"I was promised on a time/To have reason
for my rh yme;/From that time unto this season,/
f received nor rhyme nor reason."

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