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November 01, 1959 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY s

Pi l! t1 Y ,

ew Sweaters Featuring Exotic

Textures Popular

Big News in Men's Shoes;
Warm, Stylish Chukka Boot

Ly colors and exotic tex-
re the outstanding qualities
year's sweater.
most appealing new arrival
sweater scene is the wide
muted colored, brushed
ietland variety, which seems
naking such a hit with the
ity men and their femin-
interparts.
sweater seems to 1ll the

bill on all counts. It is pleasant
to the eye and to the touch, as
well as available at all prices.
The women's brushed wool
sweaters are a bit more conserva-
tive in style, if not in color. Most
of them are sans stripes, but make
up for this defiiciency with a
series of brilliant hues that out-
class the Undergraduate Library.

For those who can afford it,
there is the new, absolutely lush!
cashmere bulky knit, which comes
in beige and gray. This sweater is
simply and richly made, of double-
ply cashmere material that feels
like swansdown.
And of course, last year's striped
knitted vest is back, sporting hew
and gayer colors. .

For those with a yen for the
new and different, novelty
sweaters have been turned out by
the score. Enormous plaid bulky-
knits are coming into vogue, as
well as interesting new tweed ef-
fects.,
Double-collar turtle necks, which
first appeared last fall, seem to be
really making the scene this year,
as a pleasant medium between the
stark, Boh jersey and the mohair
or wool wide collar job which
makes so many girls look more
like geese.
Sweatshirt Sweater
Another newcomer is the furry,
sweatshirt-like article, w h i c h
seems to be able to cover a multi-
tude of sins. This sweater usually
comes in the new olive drab, or
brown, and has a startling, if en-
veloping effect.
Following the Paris trends to-
ward brevity, the new sweater is
not nearly so long 'as last year's
flapper variety, and leaves a lot
more room for the little skirt there
is left to show.
The Beat Generation has taken
over this year's sportswear. The
black turtleneck jersey mentioned
above has been joined by varia-
tions in black and white on the
same general theme.
Summing up: brushed wools,
colors, both muted nad extreme,
stripes, plaids and giant squares-
all seem to have it this season.
Classic Crewneck
But with all this new variety in
the sweater's style and design, it
is easy to overlook the classic
crewneck. This sweater, like the
Bible, remains a best-seller; for
no matter how many newer or
flashier articles appear on the
reading and wearing markets,
these two items seem to maintain
their hold.
And new versions of the crew-
neck appear from time to time,
(just as do new versions of the
Bible),. helping both to maintain
and reinforce their general appeal.
The crewneck is featured in heath-
ered colors and in heavier wools
than ever this season. Yet they re-
main the least bulky of the bulky
knits and are thus easiest worn
under winter coats.

The chukka boot is the biggest
news in University men's shoe
wear.
Its popularity can be attributed
to its warmth for winter weather,
as it goes above the ankle, and
it is durable and water repellent.
Another added feature is that it is
relatively inexpensive.
The chukka, which originated
from a desert boot, comes in more
colors than most shoe styles, but is
generally preferred in dark grays,
tans, greens and browns, with gray
being number one.
The increased popularity of this.
style may also be attributed to
the increased vogue for brushed
leather. This has increased the
casualness of the shoe and in-
creased it versatility.
In loafers, long-plug-slip-ons
have increased in popularity. This
bandless loafer is definitely on the
upswing as a dressy type of shoe as
well as .a casual one.
In the dressy shoes, cordovans
have taken the biggest lead, ap-
pearing both in plain toe and
wing-tipped brogues. These shoes
will be appearing in brown and

black colors as wel as the usual
ox-blood.
Its popularity can be attributed
to its resistance to scuffing and
to the degree of high polisl- ob-
tainable.
Also appearing more on the
dressy scene will be square toe for
the Continental look. And, too, the
saddle shoe, with brown tip and
black sole and saddle has caught
hold.
The true brown shoes, as well as
the black shoe with brown detail-
ing, are beginning to make a real
dent into black leather.
Of course, tennis shoes are still
very popular, and here there is
little change in style.
For very cold wear, such as for
after skiing, a chukka boot has
been produced with brushed nylon
fleece lining for added warmth.
Here is a case where, a desert boot
has been transformed into an ef-
fective protector against wintery
blasts.
As for color trends, despite the
added variety of colors in the
chukkas, brown and black tones in
shoes will follow the general trend
in clothing.

°

CASUAL AND COMFORTABLE -- The bulky wool sweaterF
provides all the. warmth needed for an autumn afternoon out.
of-doors. The heavy wool sweater is no longer restricted to the
classic crewneck but is now being featured in a variety of styles,
such as the wide turtle neck.

i

, I

A.

Brighter Colors
In Shoestrings
Gone From View
Where have plaid shoestrings
disappeared? They were seen oft-
en only a few years ago, but now
the only string the shoe sports are
those that match its color exactly.
Dirty white, brown, and black is
now the extent of shoestring col-,
ors. The shoe outlook is drab in-
deed.
new styles in the popular
'PIN-UPS
by
A ""
-S~l

Only for those seeking the Unusual-
JEWELRY - Handcrafted Ebony and Eterling
ART-Oil On Wood .. Sculptured by Lke
Also, Imported Iterns
LRHCDCGB

209 South State Street

(Below Bob Marshall's Bookstore)

-Dailuy--.Tim WarnekIa
BULKY KNITS-The bigger, the better seems to be the byword in sweaters for both college men
and coeds on campuses everywhere. Here at theUniversity, which is relatively close to good ski area,
these sweaters can serve a double purpose on campus and on the slope. Bulky sweaters are featured
in a variety of ways this season; bright colors and exotic textures are especially popular.

[1moll

N'

Al

.the mark of
a sOmplete wardrobe

i1

\Y
So,?

for the Persroiul Touch :
COMPLETE
MONOGRAM SJERVICIE
Bath Towels, Handkerchiefs
also bring us your
SWEATERS, BLOUSES, BLAZERS

t
i/
fi

THE QUARTER COAT, one of
the most popular members
of our ZERO KING family of
finest quality outer coats.
The shell is the finest American-grown
self-sealing SuPima* cloth. The
resistance to the weather is built
right into the fabric.
The lining is luxurious Orlon* pile, noted
for its light weight warmth.
$35
Other styles in. ZERO KING coats to meet
every requirement, from $29.95 to $80.

Bathtowels,
NOW
order your

See our, line. of
Dresser Scarfs and Throw Rugs
. .. is the perfect time to
Monogrammed Christmas gifts.

*,

Smart pin-ups neatly center
the tie and reflect the
wearer's good taste. Many
styles including cultured
pearls, gem-cut stones and
novelties. $1.50 to $5.
OC down Ps F. Tax
5 weekl
201 S. Main at Washington

GAGE UNEN SHOP
11 Nickels Arcade

4.
~-*1

I' '.

\\\\\\\

THE ZERO KING QUARTER-COAT

STATE

S T R E E T

A T L I B E R T Y

w

A

.Our classical repertory
gives you an unusually wide choice
of herringbones, stripes and sharkskins
in a great variety of
greys, olives, blues, browns.
Suits of imported fabrics, including vest.
from $75.00.

,£1

wj

, . .e

4,

' - ..
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# *

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