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October 20, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

III

$tL E

!IIES

ft

Crisler Ready To Become Commissioner
Of New American Pro Football League

by Jim Benagh, Sports Editor

,

I

IANT QUITS PISTONS-Walter Dukes, seven-foot center of the
etroit Pistons, announced yesterday to tlie'NBA pro basketball
am that he was not coming back. Dukes is a four-year veteran
the NBA, and probably will be traded.
istons Lose Former Star
.S Dukes DropsDetroit
}I

DETROIT (P) - Walter Dukes,
ren-ft. Detroit Pistons center,
t the team yesterday.sh
T'he big veteran missed the

Nma f ,C" \\ , I
Pennies!
Siart
Today 1,

club's opening basketball game in
Minneapolis Sunday after a con-
trat disagreement with General'
Manager W. Nick Kerbawy. Dukes
walked into the club's offices yes-
terday and announced.:he was re-
turning to his home in New. York.
Kerbawy. said the Pistons would
try to trade Dukes at a later date.
Dukes and the Pistons have
been about $2,500 apart in nego-
tiations.- The forme Seton Hall
star, a veteran of four seasons in
the National Basketball Associa-
tion, last met with the club. last
week for five hours.
Hairstyling to please:
Try us Cor:
* CREW-CUTS
* PRINCETONS
* PERSONALITY CUTS
* 11HAIRCUTTERS
The Dascola Barbers
near:Michigan Theatre

Man in the News
THE WAY THINGS appear right now one of the most controversial
figures of college athletics-H. 0. Crisler-will step down from the
post he has held with domination since 1941.
In those 18 hectic years, the man has made many friends but also
has aggravated many others. He has channeled Michigan Stadium
receipts into some worthy University projects, but has left vast poten-
tial fall to the wayside.
Mr. Crisler had a wonderful record as a coach-a record based on
brilliant tactical sense acquired over many years at Chicago; Prince-
ton and Michigan. He was a progressive man in coaching; he is still
sometimes a progressive man in the athletic directorship of football.
But football is only part of the athletic scene of a great university
like Michigan. And even Michigan's football position has been as-
sumed by cross-state rival Michigan State- which, ironically, is taking
quite a bit of Michigan'sall-sport domination away because of the
progressive attitude of Mr. Crisler's old line coach, Biggie Munn.
(Biggie, incidentally, is as proud a man as Mr. Crisler. But he
can sit down and listen to others, as well as explain, about his athletic
plant. This is knowledge acquired by the writer in his contacts with
both men over the past few years.),
As for football, Michigan State has taken over dominance in the
state by public relationing Michigan into submission. Half of this
particular difference is Biggie's eagerness to build good relations; the
other half is the marked coldness that Mr. Crisler projects to people.
The cold attitude of Mr. Crisler has defeated Michigan especially
in the metropolitan press of the state and also in outstate circles. He
will not even give his campus newspaper-a paper that has faithfully
been behind Michigan athletics in their most critical moniments-a
friendly look.
The athletic department plays favorites with certain newspapers
after Mr. Crisler squabbles with their chosen few opponents. Mr.
Crisler probably will make any announcement about the Commis-
sioner's position with a certain newsman he has singled out, according
to very reliable sources.
A Thing Called Progress,
WORST YET, Mr. Crisler has no warm relations with the most im-
portant figures in college athletics-the athletes themselves.
Many of them jokingly refer to Mr. Crisler as "God."
Yes, Biggie has been talled God, too, by East Lansing folks. But
Biggie has given his followers rain when they asked for it.
Mr. Crisler could, too, but doesn't. He has the greatest assets in
the college athletic world to produce with:
1) Over 100,000 alumni, most of them who are quite interested
in both athletic and University affairs.
2) A 101,001-seat stadium, which was built by this alumni in-
terest-and not, contrary to some schools of thought, by Mr. Crisler.
With Michigan's tradition, ay athletic director could fill Michigan
Stadium.
3) An interested student body.
This latter has been getting the worst treatment by the athletic
director's staid policies. Students are treated to: the grimy condition
of Yost Field House when they want to attend a basketball game.
Walking into the building, they can see soiled 1905 footballs in musty,
dimly-lit "show cases."
There is no halftime show-an obvious lack of planning, even
though the student body could come up *ith some of the country's
best talent if there was a progressive man requesting it. Paint is un-
heard of and the rest rooms are unclean.
Schedules at Michigan sare miserably conflicting for those who
like.-more than one sport.
Mr. Crisler is rarely seen at any sporting event other than foot-
ball, television basketball, baseball (which he once played proficiently),
or an occasional guest appearance at the attractive Varsity Swim
Pool.
Along with the failure to develop Michigan's vast potential, the
Crisler Myth of purity can be exploited. When he needs a fast back
to fill spacious Michigan Stadium, he does not disregard one who has
a 1.7 average.
He also puts his foot dowi when there is a possibility of a non-
athletic member getting a position on the Board in Control of Inter-
collegiate Athletics. Most of the student members have little say and
the Board holds many meetings on Friday nights when football play-
ers are not allowed to attend because of training rules.
Mr. Crisler has been a strong opponent of allowing pro football
to use college facilities. The Detroit Lions were denied permission a
couple of years back. But aren't the Detroit Red Wings, who play
against Michigan's hockey team here, just as professional?
Sometimes history is judged by what a man did. But a waste of
potential should also be recognized at an institution where progress
is cherished . . . especially when others (i.e., MSU) of less potential
begin to pass you up in many areas.

Ex-'M' Coach
Set To Leave
(Continued from Page 1)
Michigan athletic names have al-
ready been mentioned as likely
candidates once the post is va-
cant.
Heading the list is Bennie Oos-
terbaan, present assistant athletic
director and head football coach
from 1948-58.
One newspaper stated yester-
NFL Planning
For Expansion
CHICAGO (P) -- Plans for ex-
panding the National Football
League were announced yesterday
by George Halas, but several of-
ficials implied he just was having
growing pains.
Halas, owner-coach of the Chi-
cago Bears and chairman of the
Expansion Committee, said plans
call for enlarging the 40-yr.-old
league from 12 to 14 teams in
1960. He said the decision was
based, on a poll of club owners,
who also favored considering ex-
pansion to 16 teams in 1961 or
1962.
We are pleased to have MR.
MAPLES with our staff of fine
barbers. He is specializing in
crew cuts and is one of Michi-
gan's best.
TRY HIM!
715 North University

day that Oosterbaan had oncet
said he would not be interested in t
the position.
But Oosterbaan said last night
that he "certainly would consider
it"' if it was ever offered to him.E
He is the only prospective candi-
date that is still active in the ath-
letic departnent.c
Harry Kipke, the coach whom
Crisler replaced in 1938, is also-
mentioned as being in line for the i
job. However, it would be difficulti

to understand why he would ac-
cept.
Gets Large Salary
He now commands a salary as,
an executive with a Chicago soft
drink firm that nearly Uiples
what he would earn as athletic
director.
Another name that has been'
prematurely tossed into the hop-
per is that of Doug Roby, Sr., vice-,
president of the American Olym-

pic Committee, and a former
teammate and roommate of Kip-
ke's.
Roby Lives Near
Roby currently lives just outside
Ann Arbor and is an executive
with 'the American Metal Corpor-
ation.
Ivy Williamson, present athletic
director at Wisconsin and who
spent his student days at Michi-
gan, is still another possibility,
several insiders have said.

HAS YOUR. BIKE HAD
A FALL. CHECKUP?-
Bring it to the campus pedalatricians.
We also have 600 models-among which
you will find a brontosaurus.
YOU CAN'T MISS THESIGN.
Beaver's Bike & Hardware
605 Church St. NO 5-6607

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