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October 16, 1959 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Students Organize USNSA After War

Russians May Protest Lack of UN Positio

By WILLIAM N. OATIS
Associated Press Starl Writer

tion, the USNSA wished to further
international understanding.
Bring Nations Together
The Association first began
bringing together faculties and
students of various nations and
cultures in international meetings
and exchanges.
These efforts were not enough
and soon the trans-Atlantic travel
program became part of the
USNSA and Educational Travel,
Inc. was born.
"Through our educational travel
programs, we hope to promote
world unity and to achieve peace
through mutual understanding,"
stated Jean McConochie, field re-
presentative of USNSA, ETI.'
Arranges Tours
"Students can be our best am-
bassadors in stimulating under-
standing in other countries as well
as our own," continued Miss Mc-
Conochie.
For approximately $1;100 a stu-
dent can tour six nations in Europe
for 11 weeks. This includes hous-
ing, in hotels not frequented by
American tourists, but mostly by
Europeans.
NSA trips are unchaperoned and
usually only half a day is spent
on guided tours through the var-
ious European cities and with the
remainder of the day free for the
student to explore on his own.

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. -You
can expect the Russians to com-
plain again almost any day now
that Secretary General Dag Ham-
marskjold isn't giving them enough
United Nations jobs.
Hammarskjold has just put out
a report that shows that whereas
Soviet nationals ought to have be-
tween 140 and 187 good posts, they
have only 34.
That makes them even worse off
than they were last June 25, ,when
Soviet delegate Georgy P. Arkadev
put in his last complaint on the
subject, He said they should have
137 to 182 jobs and they had 35.
To Hold Debate
They will get a chance to speak
their piece in-public debate when
the General Assembly's adminis-
trative and budgetary committee
takes up Hammarskjold's report--
a complicated thing called "geo-
graphical distribution of the staff
of the secretariat of the United
Nations."
To show them he was trying, he
said in it that the case of the
Soviet Union, White Russia and
the Ukraine, "The Secretariat has
been striving for a considerable
period to recruit additional staff."
"Although sustained efforts have
been made, with the assistance of
the governments and their delega-
tions, the results have so far been
rather limited," he said.
"It appears that earlier joint

efforts are now beginning to pro-
duce results, and it is hoped and
expected that the steady progress
will continue to gain momentum."
U.S. over Quota
Meantime, though, the report
showed that the United States
with 356 jobs was well within its
quota of 334 to 445 jobs and Bri-
tain with 132 was near the top of
its quota of 80 to 133.
One of the things the Russians
complained about the last time
was that the Americans and Brit-
ish were doing better than they
were in getting Secretariat jobs.
But the report-depicting the
situation as of Aug. 31-brought
out that 'many smaller countries
were doing better than all three.
Bolivia, Burma, Ceylon, Chile,
Colombia, Cuba, Denmark, Ecua-
dor, Greece, Haiti, Iran, Israel,
Jordan ,the Netherlands, New Zea-
land, Norway, Pakistan, Peru, the
Philippines, South Africa, Thai-
land and Yugoslavia were over
quota-not to mention India.
Deficits Seen
On the deficit side along with
the Soviet Union were Albania,
Bulgaria, Cambodia, El Salvador,
Guinea, Honduras, Hungary, Laos,
Libya, Romania, Tunisia and
White Russia, which had no posts;
Hungary, Indonesia, Malaya, the
Ukraine and Venezuela, which had
1 to 3; Italy, with 18 (against a
quota of 23-29), and Japan, with
21 (against 22-37).
Each UN member country is en-

titled to a quota of posts in the
nine levels from under secretary
down, the range is determined by
the share the country contributes
to the UN's annual budget,
Most Hold Jobs
He reported that 71 of the UN's
82 members had nationals on the
UN staff as of Aug. 31-25 above
quota, 38 within quota and &
below it.
Regionally, both Eastern Europe
and North America were below the
medians of their desirable ranges,
the former ,by 69 per cent and the
latter by 24 per cent. All other
regions were over.
When it came to posts at the
three highest levels, the United
States was in the same boat with
the Soviet Union and the Ukraine.
All three had a deficiency of more
than five posts-the Ukraine 16,
the United States 37 and the
USSR 92.
Hammarskjold said that to try
to spread the jobs around better,
he sent have-not governments a
list of' current vacancies last
spring and asked them to propose
people for them. He also dis-
patched officials on recruiting
tours of the Far East and Eastern
Europe.
But one difficulty, he said, was
that newly independent countries,
especially, needed trained person-
nel themselves and so coup not
always spare any for the UN.

11

I

The Student Zionist Organization
and
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
present
"THE TRUTH ABOUT EXODUS"
A PANEL DISCUSSION featuring
JAMES GINDIN, Ass't Prof. of English
Sunday, October 18, at 8 P.M.
at HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street

Yours for Pennies!
Washed
and Ironed '
Only 30c Each
KYER MODEL LAUNDRY
AND CLEANERS
627 S. Main St. 1023 Annt.
Phone NO 3-4185.

h.

IN DETROIT

UN SECRETARIAT-The General Assembly floor is not the only
scene of Russian-created tension in the United Nations. Now, the
Russians are claiming that they are being shorted in the distribu-
tion of Secretariat jobs.

ALFRED DELLER TRIO
Music for Counter-Tenor, Lute, Viola de gamba
and Harpsichord
ART INSTITUTE AUDITORIUM
'FRIDAYOCT.23... 8:30
Tickets: 3.50, 2.75, 1.80... at Disc Record Shop

ee end..

the Paint tAvU**ott
Number I Campus Location

s family celebration
* extra guests
* special girl
Entertain them in the modern, spacious
Dining Room of
THE MICHIGAN UNION
featuring steaks, lobster, rib roast,
special dinners and inexpensive luncheons
** * * *
SERVING HOURS:.Monday thru Saturday
7:30 to 9:00; 11:45 to 1:30; 5:45 to 7:45. Sunday
8:00 to 10:00; 12:30 to 2:30; no evening service.

ITALIAN SPAGHETTI
CHICKEN-IN-THE-BASKET
to take out...
THREE DECKER SANDWICHES
HOME-MADE PIES

SERVING BETTER DINNERS FOR LESS
Serving Dinner: 5:00-7:15 Daily

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1300 E. Catherinae . . OPEN 7 A.M.-8 P.M. ... 7 days a week

Closed Sunday

On State Street

{

dine at

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f few Pi;ja tnj

DEL Rio RESTAURANT
Also
STEAKS - CHOPS - CHICKEN
SPAGHETTI - RAVIOLI-- LASAGNE
BEER and WINE- (In or Out)
Closed Monday

Roasts expertly prepared
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superb cuisine

r

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122 W. Washington

Phone NO 2-9575

300 SOUTH THAYER

;;:o
LEo PING SAY:
Don't worry about the shots at the moon, Kate. It will still
be coming over the mountain, just as sure as Leo Ping will
still be serving grand food.
Enjoy the finest in f
Canitonese and
American Food

When Important People come to town
highlight their visit with luncheon or dinner at the
Corner House -where food, service and surroundings
meet your every wish. Tuesday through Saturday. 11:30
to ?:00 and 5:00 to 7:00. Sunday: Dinner, 12:00 to
3:00. May we suggest that you
telephone for reservations?
Vihe Corner Jioudoe
S. Thayer at Washington in Ann Arbor
A block west of Rackham Bldg.--NQ 6-6056

I.

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'4

4

CHUCK WAGON

IL

Mouth-watering, isn't it? And this
tender, juicy roast is only one of a
number of delicious selections on
our menu. Why don't you come to

LUNCH and DINNERS Fine Salads & Sandwiches
A &kA^~ 1 ' DD^A P C CC

I

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11

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