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October 16, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIAY, OCT()

AC SPARK PLUG, THE ELECTRONICS
DIVISION OF GENERAL MOTORS, has
IMMEDIATE openings for permanent positions
in MILWAUKEE and FLINT for engineers
and designers on Thor and Mace missiles
as well as other advanced projects. If you have
a BS, MS or Ph.D. degree in EE, Physics, Math,
or ME, you may qualify for one of the
positions listed below.
You can exploit your talents to the fullest
degree at AC. For every AC engineer has
access to the finest equipment ... at
all AC facilities.
AC and GM gladly assist your career progress
through financial assistance for graduate study
at first class engineering schools in nearby
locations. In addition, you will have the
opportunity to take exclusive on-the-job course
work on the advanced state of the art.
DIGITAL COMPUTER ENGINEERS-Logic
design of special purpose computers ...
Pulse Circuit Design ... Airborne Digital
Computers ... Memory Design .. .
Analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog
conversion. Milwaukee
TRANSISTOR APPLICATION ENGINEERS
-Applied development in the field of
transistor circuitry. Flint and Milwaukee
GYRO ENGINEERS-Work on floated,
integrating gyroscopes and gyro-accelerometers
for inertial guidance systems for missiles.
Milwaukee
INFRA-RED DEVELOPMENT--Development
of the theoretical concepts that will advance
the state of the art of infra-red system
applications. Flint
SYSTEMS ENGINEERS-Systems design,'
analysis and instrumentation of inertial
guidance. Milwaukee
OPTICS-The development of optics and .
optical instrumentation. A general knowledge
of military optical systems and commonly used
optical and mechanical components is required.
Flint
PRODUCT DESIGN ENGINEERS-Design,
development and test of electronic components,
servos and circuits. Flint and Milwaukee
TEST ENGINEERS-Design and development
of production test equipment... environmental
test instrumentation and data reduction...
ground support equipment. Flint and
Milwaukee
FIELD ENGINEERS FOR FOREIGN AND
DOMESTIC ASSIGNMENTS-Electronics
technicians or recent technical graduates may
qualify for top training on inertial guidance,
bombing navigational systems, gyro
computers, etc.
TECHNICAL WRITERS-Electro-mechanical
or electronic writing experience. Must be able
to work with engineers in the writing of service
manuals. Flint and Milwaukee

PERIGO SMILES DESPITE WOES:
wolverine Cagers Hold First Drill

By MIKE GILLMAN
Michigan's basketball coach,
Bill Perigo, is perhaps the only
coach in the Wolverine ahtletic
departmert who manages a smile
as he recites his tales of woe.
Perigo greeted his 20 varsity
cage candidates at their first
practice yesterday with a smiling
face but the cheerless thought
that "the coming season will show
us the toughest schedule ever

played by the University of Mich-
igan."
With but six returning letter-
men, Perigo faces a first-class re-
building job. And if you don't be-
lieve this, just ask him.
With no one assured of the cen-
ter job and experienced big men
lacking at, the forward spots, the
Wolverine mentor has his only as-
surance in a plentitude of back
men.

LEADS WOLVERINE CAGERS-Terry Miller will captain this
year's Michigan basketball squad. Miller is one of six lettermen.
Football and Cross Country
Hig gt Yesterdays I-M
By JOHN KOLESAR 6, Alpha Omega 0; Allen Rumsey
and BILL PHELPS 41, Prescott 0.
Plenty of I-M action went on at Cross Country
Ferry Field yesterday. Wally Scherer of Phi Gamma
The outstanding game was Delta won the I.M cross country
played between Delta Upsilon and race yesterday in an unnofficial
Zeta Beta Tau, with the former 10:23.
winning 6-0 in a thrill a minute In his first try as a harrier,
contest. The score was made on a Scherer led his teammates to their
30-yard pass play from quarter- second athletic championship of
back Ken Deck to right end Hay- the season. The Phi Gams' 14
men during the closing 30 seconds points put them well ahead of
of the game'. Delta Tau Delta (44), Theta Xi
Other "A" action was as fol- (49), and Sigma Alpha Epsilon
lows: Phi Alpha Kappa 28, Delta (56). Last year's champion Sigma
Phi 0; Nu Sigma Nu 20, Tau Ep- Chi finished ninth.
silon Rho 0; Phi Delta Chi 22, Phi Anderson Wins
Delta Epsilon 2; Chi Rho Sigma Anderson took over from Michi-
12, Phi Chi 0. "B" action was as gan as the new champions in the
follows: Kappa Sigma 14, Sigma residence hall division. Their low
Nu. 0; Delta Sigma ;Chi. 24, Zeta total of 22 points edged out Adams
Psi 0; Simmer 8, Wesleyans 0. Beta (25), Taylor (34), and Allen Rum-
Theta Chi 18, Phi Kappa Tau 6; sey' and Gomberg who were tied
Tau Delta Chi 1, Chi Sigma Del- with 44 points.
ta 0. Scherer's winning time was a
Wines Field Action full minute faster than the pre-
At Wines Field Phi Gamma Del- vious, best listed time for the
toand igmadPhi EGsilonsu course. Stiff competition from over
plied all the action. The first score 200 runners on a smooth, dry
of the game was made near the course produced the best race and
srf hl y'RfV fastest time of recent years.

Perigo lost three regulars in
M. C. Burton, George Lee and
Gordie Rogers via graduation and
junior Dale Kingsbury by way of
the books. This leaves Terry Mil-
ler (captain), John Tidwell and'
Lovell Ferris as the only three re-
turnees who saw extensive actionj
last season. Other letter winners
returning are Rich Donley, Rich
Robbins and Gary Kane. Kane, a
football end, will be lost to the
team until the grid season ends.
Rebounding Problem
Said Perigo, "Our real problem
is going to be rebounding. At cen-:
ter we'll be trying Donley and
Ferris both for a while."
While Donley has the height
and Ferris the weight, Perigo
mentioned another possiblity who
has enough of both, Bob Brown.
"We'll have to see how Brown's
leg shapes up. He hurt it when he
was out for football. He may be
able to help us under the boards
if it comes around," said Perigo:
"It really hurt to lose Burton
and Lee in the same year. They
were two of the best rebounders
in the Big Ten, and Burton was
the top scorer.
Deep in Guards
"This year I'd like to move Tid-
well back to guard, but we've got
a lot of guards now, six good ones
(including Miller, a regular last
season). So we may have to move
him up front. I hate to do it, be-
cause he may lose a little of his
effectiveness under the boards. We
had to do the same thing with Lee,
though, and he did well- there.
"John himself doesn't care
which he plays. I think he'll prob-
ably go a little at both positions
as he did last year," Perigo added.
Even .with all these problems
staring him in the face, Perigo
lived up to his nickname of "Smil-
in' Bill" as he went onto the floor
of the Sports Building, beat his
varsity squad in a set shot con-
test, and returned to the sidelines
with a grin.
-
Dodgers, Sox
Split Record
Series Money
By The Associated Press.
The World Champion Los An-
geles Dodgers and the losing Chi-
cago White Sox will receive rec-
ord shares for the 1959 World
Series. Each ,Dodger player voted
a full share will get $11,231.18
while each White Sox full share
is worth $7,275.17, Baseball Com-
missioner Ford Frick announced
yesterday.
The rSeries set a record of $893,-
301.40 for the largest players'
share ever distributed.
The Dodgers voted 29 full shares
and the White Sox 31.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
$.
9.
10.

NU at MICHIGAN (Score)
Minnesota at ILLINOIS
INDIANA at Nebraska
IOWA at Wisconsin
NOTRE DAME at Mich. St.
PURDUE at Ohio State"
OKLAHOMA at Missouri
TENNESSEE at Alabama
Auburn at GEORGIA TECH
ARMY at Duke

11. Texas A&M at TCU
12. AIR FORCE at Oregon
13. California at UCLA
14. Wash. St. at STANFORD
15. SO. CALIFORNIA at Wash.
16. Kansas St. at KANSAS
17. PITT at W. Virginia
18. Holy Cross at SYRACUSE
19. YALE at Cornell
20. Iowa St. at COLORADO

SPORTS STAFF SELECTIONS
TOM WITECKI (41-19-.683)--Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Wis-
consin, Notre Dame, OSU, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Auburn, Army, TCU,
Air Force, UCLA, Stanford, S. Cal., Kansas, Pitt, Syracuse, Yale,
Iowa St.
MIKE GILLMAN (41-19-.683)--Northwestern, Minnesota, In-
diana, Iowa, Notre Dame, Purdue, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Ga. Tech,
Army, TCU, Air Force, UCLA, Stanford, Wash., Kansas, Pitt., Syra-
cuse, Cornell, Colorado.
JIM BENAGH (Sports Editor, 38-22-.633) -- Michigan, Illinois,
Indiana, Iowa, MSU, OSU, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Ga. Tech., Army,
TCU, Stanford, S. Cal., Kansas, Pitt, Syracuse, Cornell, Colorado.
CLIFF MARKS (38-22--.633) - Northwestern, Illinois, Indiana,
Iowa, Notre Dame, Purdue, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Ga. Tech, Duke,
Texas A&M, Air Force, UCLA, Stanford, S. Cal., Kansas, Pitt, Syra-
cuse, Yale, Colorado.
DAVE LYON (Associate Sports Editor, 37-23-.617) - Northwest-
ern, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, MSU, Purdue, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Ga.
Tech, Army, TCU, Air Force, UCLA, Stanford, S. Cal., Kansas, Pitt,
Syracuse, Cornell, Iowa St.
HAL APPLEBAUM (35-25--.583)-Michigan, Minnesota, Indiana,
Wisconsin, Notre Dame, Purdue, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Auburn, Duke,
TCU, Air Force, California, Stanford, S. Cal., Kansas, Pitt, Syracuse,
Yale, Iowa St.
BUZ STEINBERG (34-26-.567)-Northwestern, Illinois, Indi-
ana, Iowa,.Notre Dame, Purdue, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Auburn, Army,
Texas A&M, Air Force, California, Wash. St., S. Cal., Kansas, Pitt,
Syracuse, Yale, Colorado.
AL JONES (Guest Selector, 34-26-.567)-Michigan, Illinois, In-
diana, Iowa, MSU, OSU, Missouri, Tennessee, Ga. Tech, Duke, Texas
A&M, Air Force, UCLA, Stanford, S. Cal., Kansas, Pitt, Syracuse, Yale,
Colorado.
FRED KATZ (Associate Sports Editor, 27-33-.450)-Michigan,
Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Notre Dame, Purdue, Oklahoma, Tennessee,
Ga. Tech, Duke, TCU, Air -Force, UCLA, Stanford, S. Cal., Kansas,
Pitt, Syracuse, Yale, Iowa St.

GRID SELECTIONS
Time is running out on this week's fourth Grid Picks contest
as the readers have only till midnight tonight to get their entry in
The prediction on the score of the Michigan-Northwestern game
should be made very carefully as last week's winner was decided on
the basis of the Michigan score.
As has been the usual way to send your entry in, simply mail to
Grid Picks, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, or else
come to The Daily today and fill out a blank. Be sure to include your
name and address with your entry, and remember that you can only
enter once.
In answer to an inquiry, it must be reported that yesterday's 20th
game was an error, and should have been Iowa State at Colorado
This week as is the custom there is another guest editor, and a
very familiar one to Daily readers. He is Al Jones, last year's Sports
Editor of The Daily and currently a member of the Board in Control
of Student Publications.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES
Consensus Picks in Caps (Consensus, 38-22-.633)

11

.,
',.

A

SEE YOUR
PLACEMENT OFFICER
TO SCHEDULE
GENERAL MOTORS
INTERVIEW
Oct. 23, 1959

4

NHL SCORES
2

Spark Plug
the Electronics Division
of General Motors
Milwaukee 1, Wisconsin
Flint 2, Michigan

Montreal 4, Toronto

Detroit 2, Chicago 1

dnc oz Ln an ny E igms
The Phi Gams tied it up with less
than two minutes to play. The Phi
Gams then won in overtime 14-8.
Other games played at Wines
Field were: Law Club 10, Alpha
Chi Sigma 0; Falcons 6, Psi Ome-
ga 0; Delta Theta Phi 28, Phi Ep-
silon Kappa 0; Delta Sigma Delta

A

LUCKY STRIKE'

nrpeqpnts

-t

IGNew breakfast drink
you can keep in your room!

DR. PROOD'S MORAL OF THk MONTH
Things worth having are worth working for. For example; If you
want a football letter, find a football player and ask him to write
you one.

EARLY ELLkN: I get up so early
tM study that a glass of TANG
tides me over until breakfast. It's
delicious-and wakes you up bet-
ter than a cold shower.

ALWAYS HUNGRY HAL: I'm abe-
fore-and-after-meal TANG man.
It really fills in where fraternity
food leaves off. Buy two jaris.
Your friends need vitaminC, too!

LAST MINUTE LOUIE: A fast
TANG and I can make it through
class ...'til I have time for break-
fast. Fast? All you have to do is
add to cold water and stir.

DEAD BEAT DON: I have to put
in a lot of hours on njy Lit. But
since I have TANG on my book-
shelf it really keeps me going
even through the longest hours.

Dr. Frood, Ph.T.T.

Dear Dr. Frood: I am a 35-year-old
freshman. Should I wear a beanie?
Worried
Dear Worried: If I were a 35-year-old
freshman, I'd wear a mask.
C02 C* C*3
Dear Dr. Frood: Nobody likes me. Girls
despise me. Men can't stand me. Profs
detest me. Dogs snap at my cuffs. What
should I do? Hated
Dear Hated: Don't ask me. I don't like
you, either.
C02, C102 C19
Dear Dr. Frood: I'm a non-conformist.
But I smoke what everybody else smokes

Dear Dr. Frood: I'm flunking every-
thing but math. I get D in that. Help me.
(Name withheld by request)-
Dear Withheld: Spend less time on
math.
v
Dear Dr. Frood: I have a ravishingly
beautiful girl in my class. Sadly, she is
witless. Should I flunk her?
Bookish
Dear Bookish: Pass her. Other profes.
sors are waiting.

Dear Dr. Frood: I go steady with two
girls-one in the dorm, one in the Theta
house. Traveling between the two places
is making a wreck of me. What to do?
Tired
Dear Tired: Get your girl to get your
girl into her sorority.
DR. FROOD AND THE
AMAZING NEW FILTER

Rk

I had occasion recently to
study the remarkable "no
smoke" filter made of solid
lead. No matter how hard
you puff, you get no smoke.
Incidentally, a pack of these
cigarettes weighs 2 pounds.
Luckies weigh less. . and
you get smoke. The best.

______________________________________________________________ 'I

c

COLLEGE STUDENTS SMOKE;;
MORE LUCKIES THAN .
ANY OTHER REGULAR!
When it comes to choosing their regular smoke,

MORE VITAMIN C !
THAN ORANGE JUICE!
S

s1

{ I1M~ I la elU Ii.V1w W.-up Lane

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