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September 15, 1959 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, SEF

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDA1~, SEP

Hold First Fall Baseball Practice

,..

the game's the thin

AS

By TOM WITECKI
Those privileged to gain en-
trance to Michigan's daily football
practices this fall may become a
trifle startled if they glance away
from the crunching combat and
toward the green hulk of steel
and concrete that serves as the
Wolverine baseball stadium.
AVOID
disappointments
Deal with
Gold Bond
Cleaners
515 E. William

For what they will see will be
approximately 40 more, athletes
going through gyrations but of
another sort.
This group will not be dressed
in blue nor will it be tossing in-
flated pigskins through the crisp
fall air; 4instead, they will be clad
in white and flipping a sphere
that is tightly wrapped in the
skin of another animal.
It's Part of Plan
An observer might simply think
that members of this group have
simply mistaken a warm Indian
summer day for one of April's
balmiest. But he would be wrong;
for this demonstration of athletic
activity is no accident, but part
of a determined man's planning.
The man is Michigan's baseball
coach Don Lund and the fall base-
ball practice-the first in Michi-
gan's long athletic history-is part
of a plan which he hopes will lead
Michigan to a Big Ten title next
spring.
The objective of these drills,
according to Lund, will be to stress
fundamentals, experiment with
some of the returning players and
take a good look at some of the
players who will berwearing a
Michigan uniform for the first
time.
Offsets Winter Inaction
If these objectives can be ac-
complished, the squad and Lund
will be well prepared when spring
arrives in Ann Arbor. For in past
years a long winter has meant
that the team has had little or
no practice before its first game,
and the season would be half over
before the coach and team could
get really organized.
The practices will be held Mon-
day through Thursday at 3:30

p.m. for three weeks beginning
September 21. Attending will be
15 returning lettermen (excluding
gridders John Halstead, Dick Syr-
ing and Wilber Franklin), several
reserves, members of last spring's
frosh squad and several invited
freshmen.
A few of the experiments to be

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attempted will be the transfer of
regular third baseman Dave Brown
to the outfield, the trial of center
fielder Jack Mogk on the pitching
mound and the attempt to move
shortstop Gene Struczewski to
either second or third base.
Sophs Might Break In
Key sophomores in the spotlight
will be shortstop Dick Clark and
catcher Joe Murello, both of whom
could win a starting assignment
next spring. Another key new-
comer, who will be a soph next
spring, is outfielder Ed Hood, who
is working out with the freshman
football team.
Thus puzzled looks from the
football practice field this fall may
well change to smiles of pleasure
next spring if the determined Mr.
Lund brings home a winner.
Benedict Made
Frosh Coach
Moby Benedict, former Wolver-
ine baseball captain, was named
full time assistant and freshman
baseball coach during the summer
months.
Benedict aided Head Coach
Lund last season on a part-time
basis, but didn't become a full-
time member of the Wolverine
athletic staff until his appoint-
ment was confirmed by the Board
in Control of Intercollegiate Ath-
letics last month.
The 24-year-old Benedict was
a member of the Detroit Tiger
organization for several years fol-
lowing his graduation in January
of 1957.
Call to Sports
The Daily sports staff needsl
you!
If you are interested, stop in at
The Daily building at 420 May-
nard and leave your name and
address. No experience is neces-
sary..
Girls and sports photographers
are also welcome in this chance
to learn "inside sports" at Michi-
gan, the pro sports scene and in
the college circles.,

--- --

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- ATTEND NIGHT SCHOOL
Don't Just work your way up-4t
is faster to study your way up. Pre-
pare quickly for the job ahead, irv
your spare time. Just choose from
one or more of these pay-raising,
time-saving subjects.
TYPEWRITING
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evenings 6:45 to 9.
No entrance requirements. No
age limit. Individual attention.
Free Placement Service.
APPROVED FOR VETERANS
Begin next Tuesday
Write, phone, or call today for
Night School bulletin. There is n6
obligation.
HAMILTON.
BUSINESS COLLEGE
State and William Sts.
Phone NO 8-7831

Fred Katz, Associate Sports Editor
Sununer Sports Saga
ROM the sedate, dignified West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills,
N. Y. to half-way around the world in Japan; from America's
number one pastime, baseball, to the tricky art of Indian Club
throwing. In such diverse places and sports did Michigan athletes,
both past and present, compete during the leisurely, almost languid
months of a sweltering summer.
No matter where you spent your vacation months, there was
almost scertan to be mention of a Wolverine's exploits in a local
edition.
The most consistent winner of headlines wasn't exactly the
winner in most of his important matches. But Barry MacKay couldn't
be excluded from the limelight whether he won or lost. He still
remains the United States' top-ranking tennis amateur although
international glory and a youthful flock of racket recruits soon will
pass him by if the big titles continue to escape him.
MacKay, 1957 Michigan captain and NCAA singles champion,
represented the red, white and blue for the second straight year in
the Davis Cup finals. Unlike last December when he dropped matches
to Australians Mal Anderson and Ashley Cooper while Peruvian team-
mate Alex Olmedo was winning them both, MacKay began last month
as if he would be wearing the hero's mantle and Olmedo the goat's
horns.
Big (6'4), Barry disposed of eager but erratic Rod Laver after
Neale Fraser had boomed 60 per cent of his serves past Olmedo.
With the matches tied at two apiece, the scene was set for MacKay
to rule the tennis world.
But an extreme affliction of his chief ailment, double faults, again
kept MacKay from reaching the true greatness for which he often
appears to be destined. Fraser whipped MacKay easily and the big
Cup once more is standing on its head down in kangaroo land.
The results of the U. S. Championships last week at Forest Hills
were no more cheering for Americans or MacKay fans. Barry lost
out in the final round of eight to old-timer Bernard "Tut" Bartzen
who in turn dropped by the wayside in favor of Fraser.
MICHIGAN swimmers and divers
were in the news, but you
probably didn't hear much about
Ron Clark and Frank Legacki un-
less you were traveling In the
Orient. Both Junior swimmers
were members of 'a U. S. team
sponsored by the AAU and conm-
peted in two dual and two exhibi-
tion meets with a Japanese aggre-
". ' tsk > x . >dt ^t " ' ~v gatin.,s
h L^ kt 'Clark was on two winning ;relay
medley teams. And despite fourth
f < place finishes in his individual
breaststroke races, still managed
to smash the American record for
100 meters. However, it lasted
about as long as most swimming
".records have in recent years. Fred
Munsch topped Clark's effort in
the Pan-American Games a month
later..
RON CLARK Legacki also settled for fourth
sets American mark places in his event, the 100-yd.
butterfly.
MICHIGAN'S contributions to the Pan-Ams held in Chicago Aug.
27-Sept. 7 were as great as any university's, with only Illinois
being able to rival the Wolverines in either quantity or quality.
But the results ofz theg mes provide, bittersweet memories for
a couple of Michigan coaches who now can think only in terms of
what might have been. Two of the three "M" gold medal winners
have left school because of academic failures.
Alvaro Gaxiola outdove 1956 Olympie stars Don Harper and
Gary Toban in the platform event and Ron Munn, a freshman last
year, swamped all opponents on the trampoline while compiling a
nearly-perfect record. Only Dave Gillanders, champion in the 200-
meter butterfly, will be around to score Michigan points this winter,
(A complete rundown of Michigan Pan-Am results will be found
in another article in today's issue.)
THE LONE Michigan member of the College All Star football squad
added another chapter to his personal success story that is far
from finished.
Bob Ptacek, usually relegated to an understudy role before his
value can be demonstrated, rose above the best of 1959's seniors
to be named the most valuable performer in the All Star's dismal
29-0 loss to the Baltimore Colts.
As a junior, Ptacek was number two left halfback behind All
American Jimmy Pace and didn't come into his own until last fall
when he switched to quarterback, his old high school position. And
it was at the field general slot that he moved past such talented
throwers as Buddy Humphrey and Bobby Newman.
But at present its back to the understudy role for Ptacek and in
still another position. If he can emerge as even a starting threat it
will probably be his greatest achievement in an already fine career.
He's now the Cleveland Brown's number two fullback behind Jimmy

Brown.
MICHIGAN also made news on
the golf links. Dick Young-.. . .
berg, junior star for Coach Bert
Katzenmeyer, won medalist honors
in the Western Junior Open, golf
tournament held at Champaign, }.
Ill. last mont:. Youngberg tied
for ninth in the Big Ten' meet
last spring. ?
D ON'T be surprised if Steve f
Boros makes it for good with
the Detroit Tigers in another year
or 'two. Just the opposite goes for
John IHerrnstein and his trials
and tribulations in the Philadel-
phia Phillies farm system.
Boros, playing for Birmingham's
Southern Association entry (AA),.
displayed much of the batting
punch he once had in the Big Ten.
He closedl his second season with
the Barons with a respectable .305
average, good for eighth in the BOB PTACEK
league. If the former "M" captain- ... Al-Stars most valuable
elect has conquered his fielding
difficulties," his weak spot, the Tigers' $25,000 bonus might have ben
a good Investment.
Herrnstein, on the other hand, was anything but impressive in
the Class B Three-I League. The Des Moines centerfielder ended his
first season in professional ball with a meager .244 effort. However,

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