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October 11, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

M OM

I

_

CHORAL UNION PRESENTS
Pianist Gould To Play

he Z'NiePity "6 *ichifaft

First Season Concert

I

Hill
PLATORMATTACTONSAuditorium

T

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TE

3.O0

COMPLETE SERIES-Second Balcony, Unreserved
OR 30% REDUCTION ON ALL RESERVED SEATS

JULIEN BRYAN

World traveler Julien Bryan is now in Poland completing his latest and most
dramatic film story. Correlating his previous films "Peacetime Poland"
(1936) and his deeply moving "Seige" (1939) with his present effort, he
presents a visual history of the Polish people during the past eventful
twenty years.

"POLAND, "THEN AND NOW"

OCT. 22

BETTE DAVIS
and
GARY MERRILL

Canadian pianist Glenn Gould
will play the first Choral Union
concert of the season at 8:30 p.m.
tomorrow in Hill Auditorium.
He first appeared in Ann Arbor
two years ago, at the May Festival,
as soloist with the Philadelphia
Orchestra. Gould made his United
States debut in Washington in
1955, and his formal solo debut
with the Toronto Symphony Or-
chestra in 1947.
Best known as a concert pianist
and a foremost interpreter of Bach,
Gould is active as composer, lec-
turer, writer and recording artist.
He selected Bach's "Goldberg
Variations" for his recording debut
Begin Series
With Recial
Of O'CasePy
"I Knock at the Door," volume
one of Sean O'Casey's autobio-
graphy, will open at 8 p.m. Oct. 16
in Trueblood Auditorium.
It is the first speech department
production of the current Playbill
series and will be done in concert
reading.
This, to enable the cast and au-
dience to transcend space and
time, is done with readers per-
forming various roles but not mov-
ing on stage.
"I Knock at the.Door" is told in
the third person; it recounts the
childhood of the mythical "John-
ny Casside," Basic and funda-
mental things are treated.
"Nothing is momentous in it-
self, but these elemental things
become symbols of the race and
represent universal beauty,"
Brooks Atkinson, New York Times
Drama Critic, said of a New York
production.
"I Knock at the Door" was
adapted for concert reading by
Paul Shyre, and tells the story of
O'Casey's childhood in Dublin.
Reviewing O'Casey's original
book, Atkinson further commented
that it was "the most perceptive
book I have read" about entering
an adult world and "blundering
around in search of a place in so-
ciety.-
"He is writing the most glorious
English prose of his time. It is
angry because it is founded in love
and tenderness, which are the ba-
sic qualities of Mr. O'Casey's char-
acter."
Prof. Claribel Baird of the speech
department will direct the playbill
production, which features a fac-
ulty-student cast. Prof. Baird,
Prof. Edward Stasheff, and in-
structors Henry Austin and Jim
Bob Stephenson, all of the speech
department, will read roles.
"I Knock at the Door" will be
performed Friday and Saturday,
Oct. 16 and 17. "Playbill" season
ticket holders will see the reading
as a bonusrproduction, and indi-
vidual tickets go on sale tomorrow
at the box office.
DIAL NO 2-2513
Please Note Time Schedule

because "I love Bach and consider
the variations one of his great
masterpieces." The record and
Gould's artistry received immediate
acclaim.
Gould toured Europe in 1957,
and was the first Canadian musi-
cian-and the first North Ameri-
can pianist-to play in the Soviet
Union.
Prof. Heinrich Neuhaus of "Cul-
ture and Life," said of one of his
Russian performances that "he is.
of extraordinary significance In
having, as it were, bridged the gap
between Bach and our own days."
*Known for 'Idiosyncracies'
Gould's personality, too, has
caused wide comment. Known for
"platform idiosyncracies" and
slightly theatrical presentations,
his - performances involve such
things as specially designed piano
chairs. His manner has been com-
pared to that of the Romantic
pianists, such as Liszt and Paga-
nini.
Although generally thought of
as a Bach artist, Gould is definite-
ly and significantly associated
with contemporary music, and is
known as an outstanding inter-
preter of Hindemith, Schoenberg,
and Webern. He has, on occasion,
conducted Schoenberg selections
from the piano.
Since then he has toured Cana-
da, the United States and Europe,
appearing with major symphony
orchestras and giving recitals in
all principal cities.
Gould will begin his program
with "Fantasia for Organ" by
Sweelinck. This will be followed
by Schoenberg's "Suite, Opus 25,"
and Mozart's " onata in C'major,
K. 330.
' He will finish with "the Gold-
berg Variations" by Bach.

That the era when a man is
born often determines how he
thinks, is a major topic on today's
"Accent," appearing at 9:45 a.m.
today on WXYZ-TV, channel 7,
-Detroit.
Prof. Samuel Eldersveld of the

f ,

Program Notes

Celebrated screen actress Bette Davis combines her dramatic talents
with those of her husband; distinguished television and screen star Gary
Merrill, in a brilliant stage presentation of the works of Carl Sandburg.'
Appearing with them will be actor William Wintersole, and noted

TEST SCREEN-A University television cameraman adjusts his
camera. Although the University does not have a television broad-
casting station, it has studios which enable kinescope programs.
Television Program Features
Talk on Dictatorial Tendeiicies

NOV. 19

SIR DONALD WOLFIT

and

ROSLIND EDEN
Two of Britain's great Shakespearean actors, Sir and Lady Wolf it, make
Ann Arbor one of their three American engagements enroute to their
current Australian tour. Familiar figures at the Old Vic and the Shakes-
peare Memorial Theatre, they will enact, in costume, many of their
favorite Shakespearean roles.
"SCENES FROM SHAKESPEARE" JAN. 9

By MILDA GINGELL
Favorite f olk singers of Amen-
can college students, the Kingston
Trio, will make their Detroit de-,
Organization
Notices
Poster Delivery Service: Alpha Phi
Omega, service fraternity will deliver
posters ' according to the following
schedule: Central Campus, 18 boards,
Tues., Thurs.; Auxiliary Campus, 15
boards, Tues., Thurs.; Residence Halls,
21,boards, Mon., Wed., Fri.Posters must
be in the Alpha Phi Omega office, 2528.
SAB, at least one day prior to expected
date of delivery. For further .informa-
tion, call NO 3-3112 or Tim Meno at
NO 3-7541, Ext. 840.
* *
Alpha Phi Omega, pledge meeting,
Oct. 12, 7 p.m., 2528 SAB.
Congregational, Disciples, R & R Stu-
dent Guild, seminar, "Symbol, Myth
and Sign" on Oct. 11 at 8:30 a.m., 524
Thompson; Student panel. "The Guild
and the University Community" on
Oct. 11 at 7 p.m., First Congregational
Church, Mayflower Rm.
* * *
Congregational, Disciples, E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Graduate group, "World,
Federalism," Oct. 12,' 8 p.m., 524 Thomp-
son.
Graduate Outing Club, hiking, Oct.
11, 2 p.m., meet in .back of Rackham
(N.W. entrance).
Am. Chem. Soc. (Student .Affiliate),
luncheon meeting, more elements 99-
101, Oct. 13, 12 noon, 3003 Chem.
La Socieddd Hispanica, Tertulia, Oct.
12, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg. Conversa-
tion and coffee.
* *
Luth. Student Center and Chapel,
supper at 6 p.m. Program at 7 p.a. ,Oct.
11, Hill St. and S. Forest Ave. Speaker
for program: Dr. G. .Mendenhall, Near
East Studies.Dept., "The Individual in
the Old Testament."
All the latest

but at the Masonic Temple at 8
p.m. today.
On Wednesday evening, the trio,
composed of Dave Guard, Nick
Reynolds, and BobiShane, will give
another performance in Lansing.
Appearing with the trio will be
Turk Murphy and his Dixieland
Band.
* * *
Glenn Gould, hailed as "an ex-t
traordinary pianist," opens the1
Choral Union Series at Hill Aud.?
tomorrow at 8:30 p.m.t
Gould was the first Canadianc
musician and the first Northt
American pianist to perform in
the Soviet Union. In a period of
two weeks he gave eight perform-
ances in Moscow and Leningrad to
"standing room only" crowds.
Not only is Gould "a"magnifi-
cent, unique musician," but he is
also a noted lecturer and writer
on musical subjects. He has lec-
tured on contemporary music at
the University of Toronto.
For theatre lovers, the speech
department opens its "Playbill '59-
'60" 8 p.m. Friday at Trueblood
Aud. in the Frieze Bldg.
Sean O'Casey's 'autobiographi-
cal "I Knock at the Door," direct-
led by Prof. Claribel Baird 6f the
speech department, . will be pre-
sented in the form of a concert
reading. In the readers' theatre
there is a minimum amount of
settings and little or no movement
by the actors, or readers.
This is the story of O'Casey's
youth in, Dublin. His early life
was miserable and the story of
his difficulties is told in a humor-
ous style in "I Knock at the Door."
' * * *
On Wednesday, the Rackham
Lecture Hall will host the Baroque
Trio,
Beginning at 8:30 p.m. the trio,
consisting of Nelson Hauenstein
on flute, Florian Mueller on oboe
and Marilyn Mason on harpsi-
chord, will perform the music of
Handel.
The University radio station,
WUOM, will present Shakespeare's
"Much Ado About Nothing," at
1:30 p.m. today.

University political science depart-
ment and Prof. Sigmund Neuman
of Wesleyan University in Connec-
ticut will engage in spontaneous
discussions concerning psychologi-
cal effects on a person born in a
depression, during war years, or
during a boon.
Prof. Neumann believes that a
man could be more, pliable to dic-
tatorship if he were born during
a particular era. He cites as an
example the fact that the leading
Nazis 'in ,Germany were all with
the exception of Hitler born be-
tween 1890 and 1900.
As they passed their formative I
years in World' War I combat,
"they remained," he says, "activ-
ists for the rest of their lives."
Th eprofessors then transpose
the problem of generations to this
country. Prof. Neumann feels that
the great drive for security shown
by present youth, as a result of
their having been born in the
depression years, could make them
easy prey for the lures'of a dic-
tator.

r'

I
4

- DIAL NO 2-6264

I

England's delightful comedienne, Joyce Grenfell, is returning by popu-
lar request to present her one-woman show of humorous and entertain-
ing monologues. Well known in British films, radio and television, Miss
Grenfell writes much of the material for her hilarious sketches. She
was a great success here in 1956..
"AN EVENING WITH JOYCE GRENFELL" FEB. 12

I

~Thmeo
No Thrill
Likeihe
Thrill
THE
FBI
STORY,
STARRING
JAMES
STEWART
VERA
MILES,

1w

"blue
dbenim,
CAROL BRAN60H MACDONALD NA"KtA
Prouc by Dirsced lby
CRLSRKW T PHILIP DUNNE
Scoeenplay btv
EDIH SOMMER4HNIVP DUNNE
C1N +wt A5C °'R 8STEOPI~' IIOIS

HA HLRO

Hal Holbrook, the hit of the Broadway spring and summer season, broke
house records for his stage characterization of Mark Twain and his
uproariously funny selections from the works of the great humorist.
Last May he scored a noteworthy success as Twain on the Wide Wide
World telecast "The Sound of Laughter."

TECHNICOLOR OMWRIER 310$
AMER VYN ROY wd
||,een||s, by RICHARD L BREEN and JON IST
V* W by ,MERVYN ROY « ww rusm

i

in
POCKET BOOKS
and
PAPER BACKS
Come in and Browse
at.
F@iLL T TS

"MARK TWAIN TONIGHT!"

FEB. 27

I

I

Due to length of show
only 4 Shows Doily
1:00 - 3:30 - 6:20 - 9:00

Cinerna quild
TONIGHT at 8:00
THE BRAVE BULLS
with
MEL FERRER
AkNTHlnkY (Q INkJ

322 S. State4

NO 3-3371

A Sixth Attraction Will Be Announced Later

AT LAST! WE CAN NAME THE BATE!

6

I

I

,.

f

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