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October 07, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E l Cam! 1T..IICHIlGA1. DAILY

WEDNESDAY,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY,

Best U.S. Math Classes Surpass Russia's

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ent types of mathematics pro-
grams for students with differing
interests.
Presents Analysis
In a doctoral dissertation just
accepted by the University, Bruce
Vogeli presents this picture. The
Alliance, Ohio, graduate student's
analysis is one of the most thor-
ough studies of Soviet source ma-
terials ever made in this country.
He says the standard Soviet
secondary mathematics program is
better than the average American'
high school program but inferior
to many of the better programs
in this country. He notes, "The
Soviet program certainly is less
rigorous than the secondary school
mathematics programs of several
European countries." ,
In addition, the Russian strides
in mathematics education are not
nearly so great as they are played
up to be by some educators in the
United States, Vogeli says.
Cites Textbook
For instance, he cites a new
geometry book which was intro-
duced in 1956 in sixth, seventh,
and eighth grades throughout the
Soviet Union.
Although it had supposedly been
tested before it was adopted, the
text proved unsuccessful, particu-
larly in the eighth grades.
Accomplishments of Russian
students are also less than we are
led to believe, Vogeli asserts. Their
"finals" are handed out in ad-
vance, and the wording closely fol-
lows the texts.
Memorize Answers
Consequently, students memorize
answers to the finals before they
take theim. They usually fail to do'
as well on college entrance exams,
SHOP FOR
STUDENT SUPPLIES
in the modern manner
SELF SELECTION
and
OPEN DISPLAY
at
FOLLETT'S
State Street at North N.

which are not handed out before-
hand.
Vogeli notes that Sovet empha-
sis on applied mathematics may
soon be changed.
"Much of the manpower now
being trained in the Soviet system
is sorely needed for work on farms
and in lesser skilled industrial
jobs," he explains.
To Change Program
"In the future, economic neces-
sity may dictate the development
of a more differentiated educa-
tional system, placing greater em-
phasis on the practical rather than
the academic side of math and
many other subjects."
He adds that relaxation in So-
viet secondary school mathematics
programs may also be traced to
complaints by parents and doctors
against the immense pressure
placed on students to study.

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,lcn'44 Campa.4

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The first meeting of a leadership
training program sponsored by the
Student Government Council will,
be held at 4:15 today in Rm. 1548,
Student Activities Building.
Anyone, who is interested in
learning about the operations and,
activities of SGC is welcome.
Petitioning is now open to soph-
omore, junior and senior women
for 10 League positions, Mary Wil-
cox, 160, chairman of the League
Interviewing and Nominating
Committee, announced recently.
Interviewing will be held today,
Oct. 7, through Friday, Oct. 9.
Peter C. Swann, director of the
Museum of Eastern Art, Oxford
University, will give an illustrated
lecture at 4:10 p.m. Tuesday, Oct.
13, in Rm. 203, Tappan Hall.
Swann; who will speak on "Chin-
Nung, an Individualist Chinese
painter of the 18th Century," is
the author of several books on
oriental painting and editor of
"Oriental Art," a quarterly review.
* * *
The mass meeting for the dance
classes at the League will be held
at 7:30 p.m. today in the League
Ballroom, Anne Hammonds, '60, of
the League social committee an-
nounced recently.
Lessons in both Latin American
and conventional dancing will be
given, including new-style waltz,
fox trot, and the tango.

Foundation
Gives Grant.
For Project
NSA Plans To Study
Racial Relationships
The Field Foundation, Inc., of
New York has awarded the United
States National Student Associa-
tion a $60,000 grant for a two-
year human relations project.
The grant is the largest single
contribution made by the Founda-
tion to one organization.
Donald A. Hoffman,,NSA presi-
dent, said that the funds will be
used to finance special programs
for southern campuses and stu-
dent leaders "to create a deeper
understanding of the complexities
of race relations."
Discuss All Aspects,
Discussions of all aspects of
campus and community human
relations problems will be empha-
sized in the programs, and they
will be attended by student lead-
ers from white, Negro, and inte-
grated southern campuses.
Meetings will be held on an
"open" basis, including presenta-
tion of segregationist, moderate
and desegregationist viewpoints.
At present there will be two
summer seminars of four weeks
for approximately fifteen southern
student leaders.
Student participants will be
provided with travel and mainten-
ance scholarships, and. they will
be encouraged to consider their
responsibilities as future commu-
nity leaders in the South, during
the seminars.
Schedule Conferences
Also scheduled are South-wide
and regional weekend conferences
held on a similar open discussion
basis.
Other features, of the program
will include several publications
surveying campus human rela-
tions problems and progress toward
their solution.
During the next two academic
years, a student human relations
specialist will visit southern cam-
puses and provide assistance to
student organizations planning
human relations programs and
studies.
Hoffman said he was "gratified
that the Field Foundation has
made it possible for us to continue.
and expand our human relations.
program in the South where stu-
dent leadership in the solution, of
community problems will be of
major importance for many years."

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DEDICATED TODAY - The University's new radio telescope,
located on nearby Peach Mountain, is expected to prove invalu-
able in following radio signals from rockets launched hito space
in the future.
SENIORS, GRADS-
Set October 26 as Deadline
For S
For ch~olarshi A icants

"Radio telescope work is so ex-
ploratory that we can't say now
jwhat will eventually be the most
important work done," Prof. Had-
dock asserted. "We don't know
when an unexpected discovery will
shift the direction of our research
program."
To Dedicate
Dedication ceremonies are sched-
uled for 2:30 p.m. at the telescope
site. Accepting the telescope on be-
half of the University will be Ralph
A. Sawyer, vice-president for re-
search and dean of the school of
graduate studies.
Others on the program will be:
Lt. Gov. John E. Swainson; United
States Rep. George Meader; Prof.
Stephen S. Attwood, dean of the
engineering college; Dr. Otto Stru-
ve, director of the National Radio
Astronomy Observatory; and Prof.
Haddock.

As part of his talk, Prof. Had-
dock' will demonstrate the instru-
ment.
Plan Colloquium
Other special events concerning
the inauguration of the telescope
will be a colloquium tomorrow on
"The Next Five Years in Radio
Astronoiy" which will draw radio
astronomers from all over the ha-
tion, and a public open house from
2 to 4 pn.m. on Sunday afternoon.
The radio telescope is the latest
addition to the University's active
astronomy program, which in-
cludes in its facilities the Schmidt
optical telescope, also at Peach
Mountain. It is used in steller work
and the McMath-Hulbert Observa-
tory.
According to Haddock, the Uni-
versity has one of the nation's big-
gest graduate teaching and re-
search programs in astrophysics.
Astronomy is the oldest of all
sciences, while radio astronomy is
its newest branch. It began in 1932
when it was observed that radio
waves could be received from the
Milky Way. It was not until 1947,
however, that the first organized
work in this field was begun.

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New 'U' Telescope Begins Operation;
Set Dedication at Peach Mountain Today
" (Continued from Page 1)

Graduating seniors and graduate
students have.until Oct. 26, to ap-
ply for either a Fulbright or Inter-
American Cultural Convention
scholarship.
The Fulbright scholarships cover
tuition, maintenance costs and
round-trip expenses for study in
Europe, Latin America or the Asia-
Pacific area. The iACC scholar-
ships will cover transportation, tui-
tion and partial maintenance costs
for study in Latin America.,
The eligibility requirements for
both of these scholarship programs
are: United States citizenship at
the time of application; a bach-
elor's degree or its equivalent by
1960; knowledge of the language
of the ost country and good
health: Preference is given to ap-
plicants who are under 35 years of.
age and have not previously lived.
or studied abroad.
Applicants will be required to
submit a plan of proposed study

_________________________________________________
-°' ,,

that is to be carried out during the
year abroad.
University students should con-
"sult Mrs. Allie Wappula at Rm.
1020 of the Graduate School.
Others may write to the Informa-
tion and Counseling Division, In-
stitute of International Education,
1 East 67th St., New York 21, N.Y.
The IE administers both the Ful-
bright and the IACC programs.
Give Last Date'
F.or Enterin'g
Display 'plans
Housing units m ust submit
Homecoming display plans to the
displays committee by 5 p.m. to-
day, committee co-chairmen! Bar-
bara Rosbe, '60, and Ted Forbes,
'61A&D, announced yesterday.
Plans along the "Hollywood and
Vine" theme may be handed yin
at the Homecoming office in'the
Union, he said.
Over 70 petitions for displays
have already been submitted and
accepted, the co-chairmen noted.
The displays will be Judged in four
classes - sororities, fraternitie
women's independent housing, and
men's independent housing.

STARTING TODAY
DIAL NO 8-6416
.IITTE

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SATURDAY
OCTOBER 10
8:30 P.M.
CARLOS MONTOYA
World's Greatest Flamenco Guitarist
Ann Arbor High School Auditorium
Ticket's - $4.40, $3.30, $2.75, $1.65 Tax Inc.
On sale at BOB MARSHALL'S and DISC SHOP
Open Evenings
Coming November 14 ... TOM LEHRER

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Organization
Notices

#1

HEADQUARTERS FOR

BIKE

REPAIRS

(Use of; this colum nfor, an-
nouncements is available to offi-
cially recognized and registered or-
ganizations only. Organizations
planning to be 'active for the fal
semester should register by Oct. 16.
Forms available, 2011 Student Ac-
tivities Building:)
A.S.C.E. meeting, 7:45 p.m., Oct. 7,
Office of Townsend & Bottum, Inc.245
S. State St. Speaker: Mr. C. E. Bottum,
"The Civil Engineer in Construction.
Transportation provided from Engine
Arch at 7:30: p.m. Refreshments.
Congregational, Disciples, E & R Stu-
dent Guild, freshman discussions, Oct.
7, 7-8 p.m., 624 Thompson.
International Folk Dancers, dancing
and instruction, Oct. 7, 8 p.m., 537 SAB.
* * r1.
Kappa Phi Club, meeting, Oct. 8,
7:15 p.m., First Methodist Church.
Political Issues Club, organizational
meeting, Oct. 8, 8:30 p.m., Union, Rm.
3K.
Univ. 'Coed ,Horseback Riding Club,
meeting, Oct. 8, 7 p.m., WAB. For in-
formation, call NO 3-7778.

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