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October 04, 1959 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-04
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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ENNEs SWITZERLAND

ff

Foreign Lands

Town
Bly ENID I6APPIN

of Contrast

THE FIRST thing which struck Or perhaps we walked or took a
me about Bienne and that trolleybus into town. This way I
which I continually notice is that saw the small Protestant church,
this town is, above all, a town of elegant in its simplicity - the
contrasts, contrasts irretrievably only ornamentation came from
interwoven. the flowers surrounding the build-
There are the two languages ing.
one hears on the bus - next to
me the man spoke French, yet THE AREA surrounding was
across the aisle the two girls were composed of old homes and
speaking German. Bienne is an barns. As we sat in the garden we
industrial town and from our could hear the chickens. Not very
home I could see the factories far away was another. world of
and modern apartments. Yet ten factories, railroad tracks, and a
minutes' walk from the house, we beautiful modern school. The
were lost in the paths which run small city park, quiet and cool
through the forest of the. Jura was shaded by a brand new, mod-
Mountains. A short distance away ern skyscraper,
are the Tobenlch Gorges with And there is the old village. The
all the force and beauty of its first morning, all I saw were flow-
cascades, whirlpools, and moun- ers -- people bought and sold per-
tain waters. haps more flowers than food. Each
I was lucky enough to see the time I wandered through, there
city perhaps differently than many was something new which I hadn't
others. We often took our bikes seen before. There were the steps.
and rode the entire afternoon, leading to the Gothic church and
stopping by the lake to eat pastry. the small adjacent fountain, the

MAGAZINE

Vol. VI No. 2

Sunday, October 4, 1959

TOWN OF CONTRAST
By Enid Lappin
STUDENT LIFE--GERMAN
By Dorothea Steudle
SUPPRESSED HOPE
By Thomas Piatkowski
ON THE ROAD SOUTH

i
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arcades, the different styles of ar-
chitecture showing the Germanic,
and French influences, one on
either side of the street. There
was the tower and surrounding
walls illuminated at night, still
and peaceful compared to any
other time of the day.
THE BOUNDARY is distinct and
yet one passed from the old
town to the new almost without
noticing. For me it began with
the policeman directing traffic -
straight and stern with an expres-
sionless face and his long white
gloves covering hands which mo-
tion silently and gracefully to
cars, bikes, and pedestrians.
How can one help but notice
the people in the store here who
say merci, au revoir, adieu, mer-
ci as they open the door for a
customer, whether he has bought
or not. And there was the con-
ductor on the trolley who said
thank you when he took our ticket
and who always took your arm to
help you down the stairs. He was
there to take all packages, baby
carriages, and dogs to the back
where there was a cleared' area
for those who wished to stand and
smoke."
AFTER spending much time in
~one store and making several
purchases, obviously for gifts, I
was amazed to hear the proprietor
offer me also a small gift.-I'm
afraid I was so astonished that I
had to ask for a repetition.
The rest, I'm afraid, are quiet
memories and' ideas that only
those who shared them with me
would understand, a summer rich
and rewarding in every possible
way.
Enid Lappin spent the sum
mer in Bienne as part of the
Experiment in International
Living. She is a junior in the
literary college.

Why
Travel
".,Around-
the World?"

Strange lands and different cultures and the interests they hold
for students at the University is the subject of this magazine.
Some of the writers (Thomas Piatkowski, Enid Lappin and James
Seder) participated in the Experiment in International Living during
the past summer. As an Experimenter, each lived with a family in
the country of their choice and visited interesting sites within that
nation.
Roger Anderson traveled to Russia and three satellite countries
for three months through the 1959 Lisle Fellowship program. He saw
places of interest and spent some time talking with Russian students.
The Mexican and Central American trip was an unusual attempt
by Barton Huthwaite and three other students to drive by motorcycle
down the western coast of the Western Hemisphere.
The junior year abroad program has been adopted by several
American universities. Dorothea Steudle spent a year at a university
in Munich and describes the "visiting" student's life there.
Upon the invitation of James A. Houston, Northern Seryice
Officer of the Canadian government, Philip Power traveled to Baffin
IslAnd, above the Arctic Circle, to pursue his study of Eskimo carvings
in the region.
Hilary Smith tells of her experience working for the American
Friends' Service Committee in Berlin . . . and of the people from
many lands that she worked with.
A visit to the Vienna Youth Festival during a ten-week trip
through Europe provided the material for Lloyd Gelman's article on
European propaganda.
We hope you, the readers, will find these adventures in foreign
lands both interesting and provocative.
-Joan Kaatz
Magazine Editor

ECO'S athletic machine is
harnessed to an engineĀ£ as
rickety as a model "T." "Sputtered
by outdated coaching methods
and poor facilities it chugs a road
of political privilege.
In the driver's seat Ii a confed-
erated club ,system, shapedi by the
financial dictates of political
whin.. With this directive the
road ahead looms as a quagmire
of wasted athletic potential, petty
jealousies and soiled reputations.
That Mexico won six gold med-
als in the Pan American games is
a tribute to, the athletes and
coaches who overcame obstacles
built by a political muddle.
In international competition the
clubs are ruled by a Confedera-
tion president. A political 'appoin-
tee, it is his job to determine who,
is to represent Mexico in each
sport and who is to be overlooked.
A symbol of international good
will as well as manager of inter-
national sports affairs, it was ex-
pected that the Confederation
President would assume a promi-
nent voice at the Pan American
Games in Chicago.
However, "more important busi-
ness affairs" stated a Mexico City.
sport journal, "prevented the
president from attending." "Ev-
eryone," continued the same jour-
nal, tongue-in-cheek, "will remem-
ber him for the fine job he has
done in the Games."
Aside from the medal award
winners at the Games, Mexican,
teams were accoladed "could have"
laurels from the U.S. winning team
coaches. "Mexico could have a1
tremendous water polo team .. .
could have a tremendous basket-
ball team . . . could have a tre-
mendous track team if she devel-
oped her coaching techniques,"
quoted the sports journal. The U.S.1
advised Mexico to send her pres-
ent coaches across the Rio Gran-7
de to study American. coaching
methods or to offer foreign coach-i
es a chance to modernize Mexicanl
training techniques. But, contin-
ued the Mexican City journal, "the1
ears of the Confederation are
deaf." That statement is not newl
to many thousands of Mexican
sports enthusiasts, Mexican ath- 1

By RICHARD MINTZ
letes have scarred the record
books with a bickering history.
LIE MANY Mexican athletes,
Alejandro Gaxiola is person-
ally familiar with the feuds that
separate the Confederation from
its athletes. The University swim-
ming star, who represented Mexi-
co in the Pan American Games, is
a bitter critic of everything the
Confederation does and dictates.
Opening his trunk-filled store-
house of newspaper clippings about
Mexico's victories in the Games,
Gaxiola traced the history of ath-
letes that made headlines.
He pointed first to a cartoon of
a tennis player, hobbled by age
and bowed by a long beard. On his
head are two crowns. This was
Antonio Palafox who triumphed
in men's and mixed doubles com-
petition at the Games. The Con-
federation, though, was reluctant
to give him a place on the team
because he was "too old," quoted
the cartoon, for competition. Be-
cause of Palafox, Mexico today is
a center for international tennis
tournaments.
But ten years ago tennis was a
struggling sport in Mexico, and
Palafox was its prime mover to
present fortune. Refused financial
assistance from the Confederation
to participate in a European ten-
nis tournament ten years ago,
Palafox nevertheless accepted the
invitation. Hoping his tennis abil-
ities would ticket his living ex-
penses abroad the hopeful racket
star entered tournament after
tournament and won.
Gaxiola had to dig deeply into
his trunk to retrieve the well re-
membered story of Colonel Hum-
berta Mariles who was refused a

'
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pared f or the Games, Capilla was give Alvaro a place on the squad. F

A Harnessed Athletic' Machine
Mexico's Confederated Clubs

berth on the 1956 Olympic team.
The defending equestrian cham-
pion, favored to repeat that year
at Melbourne, had fallen from the'
good graces of the Confederation
and was denied the finances to
back his trip. When Mariles tried
to raise his own Olympic fund by
soliciting an all-too-eager-to-help
public, the Confederation made'
him return all he earned. Mexi-
co's sure-to-win equestrian team
wasn't represented at Melbourne.
The world's greatest platform
diving champion at that time was
Joaquin Capilla, the darling of
Mexico's sport circles. The Con-'
federation was certain that Capil-
la would return a gold medal to
Mexico at the Olympics but Ca-
pilla wasn't so sure. He knew the
competition at the Games, Gaxiola
said, would be far more rigorous
than that in Mexico. Capilla re-
ceived an invitation from Gary
Tobian and Pat McCormack, two'
of America's great divers, and he
decided to prepare for the Games
in California with this top-calibre
competition. Financing his own
trip so that he'd be better pre-
pared for the Games, Capilla was

soon recalled by the Confedera-
tion.
If he didn't return immediately,
said the Confederation, he would
not be permitted to represent Mex-
ico. The Confederation's state-
ment was published in the sports
journals, added Gaxiola, and its
action was protested by coaches
and fans.
G AXIOLA takes particular pride
in the photographs taken of
Capilla whose arm is draped across
the slimly-built, beaming athlete
holding an enormous trophy. Al-
varo Gaxiola, former University
diving star before he was declared
academically ineligible this se-
mester, is Alejandro's brother and
the winner of the Pan American
platform diving crown. Four years
ago, when Alvaro was ranked sec-
ond to .Capilla, the Confederation
decided he didn't merit a berth on
the Olympic team. His name was
withdrawn to make room for a
Confederation delegate. The Con-
federation, critical of his abilities
before this past summer's Pan
American Games, was reluctant to
give Alvaro a place on the squad.

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F
STYLE

Page Two

Page Three

i

.Page Four

By Barton Huthwaite
EXODUS: THE HARD SELL
By James Ginden
THE EXPLOSIVE CARIBBEAN
By Thomas Turner

i

._Page Five
Page Seven
Page Eight
wPage Nine

solve all your gift problems at
d

co
is now~
Weather'
"HIDC
GRE)

sports enthusiasts. Mexican ath- berta Mariles who was refused a

THE NEW ORIENT
By Fred Schoen
EXPRESSIONS OF PROPAGANDA
By Lloyd Gelman
MAKING LIFE MORE BEARABLE
ByHilary Smith
RUSSIAN STUDENT LIFE
By Peter Dawson

I-

309 S. State

NO 5-7921

Page Ten

PNMNWNWMM

logo=

...m

Page Eleven

Page Twelve

ESKIMOES FACE MODERN LIFE
By Philip Power P
THE SOCIAL DEMOCRATS' DREAM
By James Seder P,
HARNESSED ATHLETICS
By Richard Mintz_______________

Page Thirteen
Page Fourteen

FASHION

So light . .
velvety Cro
finish, wide
lined in IUXL
pile with C
sleeves. Loh
fawn.

goes

Casual

Page Fifteen

MAGAZINE EDITOR-Joan Kaatz
PHOTOS: Cover: top right-Thomas' Turner, bottom left-Ross Ros-
enberg; Page Three: University Photographic Services; Page Four:
Thomas Piatkowski; Page Five: upper left-Wilbert Porter, right
-Richard McElroy; Page Six: Richard McElroy, bottom right--
Thomas Turner; Page Eight: Thomas Turner; Page Nine: upper
left--Thomas -Turner, sketches-Ross Rosenberg; .Page Eleven:
Hilary Smith; Page Twelve: Roger Anderson; Page Thirteen:
Philip Power; Page Fourteen: James Seder.

This coat a
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